Godzilla vs. Megalon (1973) - News Poster

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A Look At the Enduring Popularity of Godzilla

  • Cinelinx
This week, the first-ever full-length animated Godzilla movie debuts on Netflix. Originally released last year in Japan, Godzilla: Monster Planet is the 32nd Godzilla movie to come out in the past 64 years. Cinelinx takes a look at the big, radioactive reptile, focusing on the many ups-and-downs of the King of Monsters.

What is it about this giant monster that’s kept him so popular for so long? This character, created by Toho Studios over six decades ago, has often been a subject of ridicule—especially some of the later Showa entries of the 1970s—and few people will freely admit to loving Godzilla films. The image of guys wrestling in rubber monster suits and destroying miniature models of Tokyo is what most folks think of when Godzilla is mentioned. And even diehard fans like myself can wince in embarrassment at moments like the Godzilla dropkick from Godzilla vs. Megalon, or
See full article at Cinelinx »

Crypt of Curiosities: Mechagodzilla in the ’70s

  • DailyDead
Even before I’d seen a single Godzilla movie, I knew Mechagodzilla was my favorite damn thing in the entire franchise. Because really, how could it not be? Regardless of its incarnation, Mechagodzilla is still a giant robot shaped like a monster. There are few things in entertainment that are quite that perfect, and it seems that pop culture agrees. Mechagodzilla has become something of a series icon, up there with King Ghidorah and Mothra as one of the most recognizable non-Godzilla kaiju in the franchise. Yet all legends have to start somewhere, and for Mechagodzilla, it was in the fourteenth film of the franchise, Jun Fukuda’s aptly titled Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla (1974).

Taking place presumably sometime after the previous year’s Godzilla vs. Megalon (although continuity was never the Showa series’ high point), Godzilla vs. Mechagodzilla takes place in a Japan already rocked by monster attacks, with a
See full article at DailyDead »

My Pet Monster: 5 Films That Made Allies From Beasts

A fistful of monster mashes in the wake of Nacho Vigalondo’s ‘Colossal.’

This weekend Nacho Vigalondo’s Colossal stomps into New York and Los Angeles to establish itself as the new King of the Monsters. While I am ready to hear your hyperbolic rants on how this kaiju fairs against the granddaddy of them all, I think it’s best if we avoid those comparisons, and simply appreciate how Nacho’s movie captures the somber drone of A Monster Calls while elevating to the heights of an epic genre party film. Like most horror geeks, I’ve always sided with the beasts. Part of that attraction certainly stemmed from my only-child status; the symbiotic relationship between Jack Kirby’s Devil Dinosaur and Moon Boy was painfully appealing to this basement bound TV brat. The other aspect was simply that lugging around a My Pet Monster could act as a talisman for the strength I feared was
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

60 Years of Godzilla: A History and Critique of the Greatest Monster Movie Series in Cinema

**Massive spoilers for every Godzilla movie, with the exception of the 2014 reboot, and Mothra follow**

August 6th and 9th, 1945 forever changed the course of history. When the first nuclear bombs were dropped in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, World War II ended, but a new fear was born that dominated the thoughts of all men, women, and children for decades to come. The Cold War, atomic bomb testing, a cartoon turtle telling children to “duck and cover”, and this new technology that had the actual potential to literally end the world changed the perception of what was scary. Art reflects life, so cinema began to capitalize on these fears. Gone were the days of creepy castles, cobwebs, bats, vampires, werewolves, and the other iconic images that ruled genre cinema in film’s earliest decades. Science fiction was larger than ever and giant ants, giant octopi, terror from beyond the stars, and
See full article at SoundOnSight »

White Hat or Black Hat: Should Godzilla be a Hero or Villain? (Spoilers)

  • Cinelinx
The new Godzilla remake has finally arrived in theaters. The rebooted king of monsters stars in his 30th film in 60 years but he continues to vacillate between good guy monster and bad guy monster. Which way does Godzilla work better? Should he be the sheriff or the outlaw?

(Spoilers ahead)

60 years ago, Gojira/Godzilla: King of the Monsters debuted on screen; with a towering reptilian protagonist who was basically a rampaging beast. He was really a metaphor for the destructive power of the A-bomb. In the following three sequels, Gojira’s Counter Attack (Aka Gigantus the Fire Monster/ Godzilla Raids Again); Gojira vs. King Kong (Aka King Kong vs. Godzilla), and Mothra vs. Gojira (Aka Godzilla vs. the Thing); the radioactive monster continued his destructive, city-flattening ways, earning the enmity of the citizens of Japan. He was the ultimate threat.

By his fifth and sixth films, however, The Three
See full article at Cinelinx »

White Hat or Black Hat: Should Godzilla be a Hero or Villain? (Spoilers)

  • Cinelinx
The new Godzilla remake has finally arrived in theaters. The rebooted king of monsters stars in his 30th film in 60 years but he continues to vacillate between good guy monster and bad guy monster. Which way does Godzilla work better? Should he be the sheriff or the outlaw?

(Spoilers ahead)

60 years ago, Gojira/Godzilla: King of the Monsters debuted on screen; with a towering reptilian protagonist who was basically a rampaging beast. He was really a metaphor for the destructive power of the A-bomb. In the following three sequels, Gojira’s Counter Attack (Aka Gigantus the Fire Monster/ Godzilla Raids Again); Gojira vs. King Kong (Aka King Kong vs. Godzilla), and Mothra vs. Gojira (Aka Godzilla vs. the Thing); the radioactive monster continued his destructive, city-flattening ways, earning the enmity of the citizens of Japan. He was the ultimate threat.

By his fifth and sixth films, however, The Three
See full article at Cinelinx »

All The Cities Destroyed By Godzilla

Godzilla is one destructive creature. Over the course of 28 Japanese films and four American films, the monster (and the other kaiju that have appeared in the franchise) has nearly destroyed 19 cities in addition to fighting in space and underwater. Whether it’s intentional or not—sometimes Godzilla is nearly protecting us from alien creatures bent on destroying Earth—cities fall under the brute strength, physical size and eternal frustration of the mutated amphibian.

In the new film, starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen and Ken Watanabe, the creature expands his destruction count by rampaging Honolulu, Las Vegas and San Francisco. All three cities are a far cry from Tokyo, a city that has been destroyed more times than an other location in the long-running franchise. In a handy little guide to destruction, VH1 has compiled a complete list of cities destroyed by the monsters.

Tokyo

The capital of Japan has served
See full article at TheFabLife - Movies »

10 Things We Don’t Want to See in the New Godzilla Film

  • Cinelinx
There are high expectations for the Godzilla reboot. Skeptics fear that this could become another farce like the 1998 version. Hell, even the original Toho series eventually degenerated into self-parody. There's hope for the new film as well, generated by the footage we've seen so far, and we feel that if Gareth Edwards and WB can steer clear of these ten horrible ideas from Godzilla's past, the film will be just fine.

Godzilla Running Away: One of the worst aspects of the lamentable 1998 version of Godzilla was that our reptilian star acted more like a scared animal than a destructive, savage force of nature. Zilla (as the American Godzilla is often called to differentiate him from the iconic Japanese Godzilla) spends most of the film running away from the military, rather than taking a stand. What kind of a kaiju retreats from soldiers? Not the Godzilla we know and love.
See full article at Cinelinx »

Destroy All Monsters And Godzilla Vs. Megalon Heading To Blu-ray

And the Godzilla train just keeps on rolling. With the anticipated blockbuster status of Gareth Edwards Godzilla you can bet we’ll being seeing the giant lizard around every corner and tonight brings us news of the Blu-ray release of a couple of classic Godzilla titles. Destroy All Monsters and Godzilla Vs. Megalon are getting the treatment from Media Blasters and here are all the details you need.

July 22nd is the release date and Aith … Continue reading →

Horrornews.net
See full article at Horror News »

Godzilla vs. Megalon and Destroy All Monsters Blu-ray / DVD Release Details

It’s been a long time in the works, but Media Blasters has announced that they will release Godzilla vs. Megalon and re-release Destroy All Monsters on Blu-ray and DVD this July:

“(New York City) Media Blasters Inc. and their Tokyo Shock label are proud to announce the first time North American/U.S. Blu-ray releases of Destroy All Monsters and Godzilla Vs. Megalon. Both Godzilla classics will be released individually on DVD and Blu-ray and as a box set to follow the wide theatrical release of the new Hollywood-produced Godzilla.

Destroy All Monsters (1968) is universally considered the strong fan favorite of the entire Godzilla series! It’s an all-star monster rally of epic proportions featuring Toho’s greatest and wildest mammoth monsters in the ultimate, all-out rumble! See Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan, King Ghidorah, Anguirus, Minya, Spiega, Baragon, Gorosaurus, Manda and Varan in all their titanic glory! The film was
See full article at DailyDead »

Thn’s Godzilla Countdown #13: Godzilla Vs. Megalon (1973)

On 16th May 2014, Toho’s greatest monster will return to the big screen in an American reboot. With just 17 weeks to go, we here at Thn are counting down the Godzilla back catalogue.

Director: Jun Fukuda

Starring: Katsuhiko Sasaki, Hiroyuki Kawase, Yutaka Hayashi, Robert Dunham, Kotaro Tomita, Ulf Otsuki, Shinji Takagi

Plot: A professor’s invention, a robot named Jet Jaguar, is stolen by a group of undersea dwelling humans in order to lead the monster Megalon on a path of destruction.

It was bound to happen at one point. The popularity of weekly tokusatsu shows such as Ultraman gradually weaselled its way into the Godzilla franchise. And who can blame Toho for trying? Robots? Cool! Monsters? Cool! This is even apparent today with the likes of Pacific Rim on the big screen in the last year. However, it wasn’t supposed to be that way at the beginning. In actual fact,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Comic Book Review - Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #7

Luke Owen reviews Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #7...

Who… or what, is Jet Jaguar? The size-changing robot has appeared mysteriously, but is he friend or foe? As the alien attack on earth ramps up, Jet Jaguar holds the balance of power in his hands!

Punch! Punch! Punch!

In the last issue of Godzilla: Rulers of Earth, Chris Mowry and Matt Frank made a very strong effort to make some of the lesser known kaiju into worthy advisories to take on The King of the Monsters. Due to the duo's incredible level of talent, they managed to make Moguera and Orga into characters that could stand toe to toe with Godzilla, but the final panel tease showed that they were about to take on a kaiju that is known as the "joke" of the franchise.

Mowry and Frank have brought Jet Jaguar into the fold.

For those not in the know,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Comic Book Review - Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #6

Luke Owen reviews Godzilla: Rulers of Earth #6 from Idw...

The stakes have never been higher when an alien onslaught on Las Vegas reveals new weapons for both sides of the conflict! Meanwhile, Lucy has her own problems to deal with as two countries pit monster against monster, with her team caught in the middle.

Chris Mowry and Matt Frank's Godzilla train rolls in with an action packed sixth issue featuring some outstanding fights, great artwork (most of the time) and a surprise ending that will put a smile on the face of any Godzilla fan.

If there is one thing that Godzilla: Rulers of Earth has succeeded in, it's bringing together epic fights. Whether it be the opening issue brawl between Godzilla and Zilla or the city-tearing battle with Destroyah, Mowry and Frank have really hit the nail on how to appease fans of the character and franchise. And, much like Zilla and Destroyah,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Sacha Baron Cohen Pranks A-List Crowd at BAFTA Awards

  • The Wrap
Sacha Baron Cohen Pranks A-List Crowd at BAFTA Awards
When you invite Sacha Baron Cohen to your awards show, you should probably expect the unexpected. He didn’t disappoint Saturday night at the BAFTA La Britannia Awards when, after receiving the Charlie Chaplin Britannia Award for Excellence in Comedy, the “Borat” star did a quick dance, tapped his cane a few times and stunned the crowd of Hollywood heavyweights by tripping and knocking a wheelchair-bound 87-year-old woman off the stage and into the audience. Also read: ‘August: Osage County’ Review: Meryl Streep and Julia Roberts Go at It Like Godzilla vs. Megalon It took the Beverly Hilton crowd a moment to realize who.
See full article at The Wrap »

B-Sides: Godzilla and Jet Jaguar Punch, Punch, Punch

You’re a robot made by humans. But Jet Jaguar, Jet Jaguar, you did it, Jet Jaguar. Go, go to protect the peace. We are all surprised at the courage you show. Godzilla and Jet Jaguar, Punch! Punch! Punch!

Toho Studios held a contest in 1972 asking fans to come up with the idea for a new giant monster wrestling robotic superhero along the lines of the enormously popular Ultraman at the time. The winning submission was a robot named Red Arone that looked like a hybrid of Ultraman and another popular Ultraman wannabe named Spectreman. Toho changed its name to Jet Jaguar with plans to launch the contest winner into superstardom with its own movie: Jet Jaguar vs. Megalon.

Upon quickly realizing that this newbie creation did not have the star power to carry its own movie, Toho brought in their signature star, Godzilla, to give the rub to their
See full article at Dread Central »

Special Features - Watching fifteen Godzilla movies or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Monsters

David Bishop reflects on his 15 movie Godzilla marathon...

If you've been reading fellow Flickering Myth writer Luke Owen’s various articles, you’ll know that Luke, our partner in crime Jon Lipscombe and I undertake a movie marathon each month. For February we chose Godzilla, or, more specifically, the first fifteen Godzilla movies. As there are twenty-nine altogether, we felt that splitting the series into more manageable, bite-sized, pieces was the way to go. Although, as I’ll discuss later on, fifteen films with virtually the same plot (and in some cases the same footage) was perhaps a film or five, too many.

After watching the trailer for Del Toro’s upcoming Kaiju film, Pacific Rim, fifteen Godzilla movies, over the course of twenty-six hours, seemed like a really tantalising idea. However, as the hours ticked by, and the sight of men in rubber suits throwing rocks at each other got more and more tedious,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Movie Marathon VII - Godzilla (Showa Era)

Luke Owen and his movie marathon cohorts takes in a 15 movie Godzilla marathon...

Movie Marathon Meeting - Where 3 guys watch franchise movies one after the others. This marathon is sponsored by curry, beer and a lack of sleep.

To date, our longest marathon was the initial marathon of Friday the 13th at 12 movies which spanned over 24 hours due to travel back and forth from London. But never had we taken on a marathon over 10 movies in one location.

With Pacific Rim heading into cinemas soon and the Godzilla reboot going into production next month, I decided to give my fellow Movie Marathon Meeting co-founders a history lesson in Kaiju cinema by taking in the Showa Era of Godzilla movies (1954 – 1975). The King of the Monsters has featured in 29 movies (including the American one) and we were about to watch the first 15 of them. It’s our longest marathon to date.

I
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Elizabeth Olsen reveals Godzilla's tone

We reported a few days ago that Elizabeth Olsen was in the running for the Legendary reboot of Godzilla along with Breaking Bad star Bryan Cranston. With production due to start next month, Olsen had a few words to say about the project while on the red carpet of last night's BAFTA awards.

"It's definitely not light-hearted," the Martha Marcy May Marlene star said. "It's kind of going back to its roots of the original Japanese film."

The original movie she speaks of (Gojira) was used by director Ishiro Honda as a message of nuclear war and the devastation it can bring. Incredibly dark in tone and presented with gritty realism, it was a stark contrast to films that would come after it such as Son of Godzilla and Godzilla vs. Megalon where he was presented as a world protector.

Ever since he was announced as director, Gareth Edwards (Monsters
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Destroyer14 Revisits Godzilla Vs. Megalon

Ah, Godzilla vs. Megalon, a title fans cringe when hearing it. However, over the years, the fanbase has gained a liking for the film, becoming what the critics call a 'cult classic.' Back in the day I would hear fans call this the worst Godzilla movie ever. Today, things are different. Final Wars has taken its place and is the hated one now. (A lot of people tend to even like All Monsters Attack more than Final Wars, though most agree that it's still better than the 98 film.) Godzilla vs. Megalon is the most low-budgeted Godzilla film since All Monsters Attack. Thought Godzilla vs. Gigan had stock footage? That was nothing. Here the majority of Megalon's 'attacks' on the city are stock footage from Ghidorah and a few others. Also, you'll notice that Japan seems like a ghostown. It's like everyone died in the previous film and it's just
See full article at ComicBookMovie »

'Hunger Games,' 'Jaws' and 'The Raid' Lead the Week's New DVD and Blu-ray Releases

You want to hear something interesting? The top selling version of The Hunger Games on Amazon as I write this up is the [amazon asin="B008602KQI" text="Instant Video Version"], not the DVD or the Blu-ray. As far as I can remember this is the first time I've ever seen this happen with a new release. It's probably only because I believe Amazon releases those a week early to entice people to buy them before they then buy a physical copy, but it's a clear sign to me that the times... they are a'changin'.

Jaws I wrote up my review of this new Blu-ray release of Jaws just last night and highly recommend fans of the film pick it up. It's got an immaculate transfer, vivid, cleaned up and vastly superior to anything I've ever seen plus a restored audio track and, for the first time ever on home video, the feature length making-of documentary "The Shark is Still Working.
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »
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