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Seventeen Moments of Spring 

Semnadtsat mgnoveniy vesny (original title)
A 1973 Soviet twelve-part television series, directed by Tatyana Lioznova and based on the novel of the same title by Yulian Semyonov. The series portrays the exploits of Maxim Isaev, a ... See full summary »
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Episodes

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Years



1  
1973  

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Vyacheslav Tikhonov ...  Stirlitz 12 episodes, 1973
Yefim Kopelyan ...  Narrator 12 episodes, 1973
Leonid Bronevoy ...  Müller 10 episodes, 1973
Ekaterina Gradova ...  Kathe 9 episodes, 1973
Rostislav Plyatt ...  Pastor Schlag 9 episodes, 1973
Oleg Tabakov ...  Schellenberg 8 episodes, 1973
Nikolai Prokopovich ...  Himmler 7 episodes, 1973
Yuriy Vizbor ...  Bormann 6 episodes, 1973
Mikhail Zharkovsky Mikhail Zharkovsky ...  Kaltenbrunner 6 episodes, 1973
Leonid Kuravlyov ...  Eismann 5 episodes, 1973
Wilhelm Burmeier Wilhelm Burmeier ...  Göring 5 episodes, 1973
Vasiliy Lanovoy ...  General Wolff 5 episodes, 1973
Konstantin Zheldin ...  Holtoff 5 episodes, 1973
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Storyline

A 1973 Soviet twelve-part television series, directed by Tatyana Lioznova and based on the novel of the same title by Yulian Semyonov. The series portrays the exploits of Maxim Isaev, a Soviet spy operating in Nazi Germany under the name Max Otto von Stierlitz, depicted by Vyacheslav Tikhonov. Stierlitz is tasked with disrupting the negotiations between Karl Wolff and Allen Dulles taking place in Switzerland, aimed at forging a separate peace between Germany and the Western Allies. The series is considered the most successful Soviet espionage thriller ever made, and is one of the most popular television series in Russian history.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama | History | War

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

According to the original book, Stirlitz was single and had a girlfriend abroad. The scene of Stirlitz's short date with his wife was Tatyana Lioznova's idea. When she showed footage to the crew, Yulian Semyonov agreed it was very good and was very frustrated that he didn't write the scene. See more »

Quotes

Heinrich Mueller: These days you can not believe anybody. Even yourself. You can believe me, though.
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Connections

Referenced in Investigation Held by Kolobki (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

Pesnya o dalyokoy Rodine
(uncredited)
Music by Mikael Tariverdiev (uncredited)
Lyrics by Robert Rozhdestvensky
Performed by Iosif Kobzon (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
Bond, Step Aside: Stierlitz is in town
10 January 2003 | by Yuri-8See all my reviews

One of the little-recognized deficiencies of spy movies is that 'action'--chases, shootings, explosions, etc.--is dominant content. Of course, the trend caters to modern audiences that are addicted to sound and special effects. However, action-driven spy movies (e.g., James Bond) suffer from 3 major defects: 1)They are not believable 2)They contain little or no acting performances to speak of 3)As such, they are easily forgettable. This is not the case with "17 moments of spring" (hereafter SMOS)

The 12 episodes of the series have been specifically shot in Black and White, in fairly simple studio sets, with no special visual effects. What makes SMOS the favorite of audiences, is a gamut of absolutely incredible acting. Each role, even a minor one, casts an "all-star" Soviet actor, and they deliver deep psychological performances. Tikhonov is an obvious star as Stierlitz, but consider Leonid Bronevoy as Mueller, the friendly, always suspicious and incredibly cruel inside Gestapo chief. Or Oleg Tabakov, as cheerful Schellenberg of the German intelligence. Or Plyatt as very vulnerable and very human Pastor Schlag who nevertheless embodies the power of the Church.

So essentially SMOS is not a spy movie, but a tight psychological drama. But we must not forget the subject, and it is an important one, based on a major real life event: in early 1945, trying to finish off the Nazi Germany, the Russians found out that SS-gruppenfuehrer Karl Wolff (essentially a representative of the odious Himmler) attempted to negotiate a separate piece with the Americans in Italy. The talks were top-secret (OSS star Allen Dulles was the US negotiator) and essentially meant a betrayal of Russia by its anti-Nazi allies. SMOS is about how the Russians discovered the secret and forced the end to negotiations.

In short, this is one of the greatest all-time spy thrillers. Just as "Rosemary's Baby" is arguably the best horror movie because of its acting and directing, so does SMOS shine through the mediocrity we are fed today. I wish it were shown to the wide Western audiences, so that they can see for themselves!


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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

Soviet Union

Language:

Russian

Release Date:

11 August 1973 (Russia) See more »

Also Known As:

Seventeen Moments of Spring See more »

Filming Locations:

Moscow, Russia See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(12 parts)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See full technical specs »

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