Man About the House (1973) - News Poster

(1973–1976)

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17 Shows That Came From Foreign Lands

As Americans, we like to think we're the best at everything, but that's not always the case. With television, some of our favorite and most popular shows didn't originate here in the U.S.

We've adopted lots of British television, but other countries are represented as well.

You might be surprised where some of these shows came from. 

Click through our list to see which shows weren't born in the U.S.A.

1. Shameless This dark comedy has it's origins in Britain where it was a solid hit. Not all version of British shows are successful in the U.S., but Shameless is one of the lucky ones. 2. Three's Company Three's Company was based on the British hit series, Man About the House. It followed Jack, Chrissy and Janet who lived together on the falsity that Jack was gay, because their landlord, Mr. Roper would never allow such living arrangements otherwise.
See full article at TVfanatic »

Cult British Comedy 'Peep Show' Gets Starz Adaptation

Beloved British comedy Peep Show ended its nine-season Channel 4 run in December, but the sitcom will enjoy a second life as an American adaptation. The series' producers agreed to a development deal with Starz to bring Peep Show stateside, Variety reports.

The dark comedy starred comedy team David Mitchell and Robert Webb as roommates/social misfits navigating everyday life. The show was presented in a first-person perspective, with viewers assuming the gaze of either Mitchell's Mark or Webb's Jeremy while the respective comedian provided his dialogue in voiceover.

Peep
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Three’s Company movie in development at New Line

New Line Cinema is in talks to pick up the rights to the classic U.S. sitcom Three’s Company, with The Hollywood Reporter revealing that the studio has tapped Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein (He’s Just Not That Into You) to write the script for a feature film adaptation.

Based on the British series Man About the House, Three’s Company starred Joyce DeWitt and Suzanne Somers as two single women who take in a male roommate, played by John Ritter, who has to pretend to be gay to appease their landlord. The show aired between 1977 and 1984 on ABC.

According to THR, New Line and producers Robert Cort and Don Taffner Jr. are looking to retain the 1970s setting for the movie adaptation.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

'Three's Company' Movie Set in the 70s Planned at New Line

'Three's Company' Movie Set in the 70s Planned at New Line
The Regal Beagle is back in business, baby! Yes, New Line Cinema has come knocking on the door of an ancient sitcom, hoping to revive it to box office success. The studio is ready to bring Three's Company to the big screen. And this TV-to-movie adaptation will be set in the original's 1970s timeline. New Line is currently in negotiations to pick up the rights to the slapstick feature film, which originally aired on ABC.

Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein are writing the screenplay for Three's Company. The duo is best known for their work on the 2009 hit romantic comedy, He's Just Not That Into You. According to THR, Veteran producer Robert Cort is shepherding the project forward. He's known for such blockbuster comedy hits as Tom Cruise's Cocktail and Julia Roberts' Runaway Bride.

Three's Company first debuted in 1977 and was an instant hit, staying in the top
See full article at MovieWeb »

'Three's Company' Movie Adaptation in the Works

'Three's Company' Movie Adaptation in the Works
New Line Cinema is in negotiations to acquire the rights to classic sitcom Three's Company and has hired screenwriters Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein (He's Just Not That Into You) to author the script for a film adaptation. Robert Cort (Cocktail, Runaway Bride) will produce the project, which will be set in the 1970s, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Three's Company, which aired from 1977 to 1984 on ABC, focused on an unlikely trio of Santa Monica roommates: two single women and a man pretending to be gay in order to circumvent the era's narrower housing norms.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Three’s Company’ Movie in the Works at New Line

‘Three’s Company’ Movie in the Works at New Line
New Line is in talks to pick up the movie rights to the sitcom “Three’s Company,” and has hired the writing team of Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein.

Robert Cort, whose credits include “Runaway Bride,” is attached to produce.

ABC’s “Three’s Company” aired from 1977 to 1984 and starred John Ritter, Joyce DeWitt and Suzanne Somers as roommates who pretended that Ritter’s character was gay in order to placate their hard-nosed landlord, played by Norman Fell. Somers left the series in the fifth season and was replaced by Jenilee Harrison and later by Priscilla Barnes.

The show was based on the British sitcom “Man About the House.” New Line is planning to set the movie in the 1970s.

Kohn and Silverstein have collaborated with New Line on “Valentine’s Day” and “How to Be Single.” They also wrote the script for the love story “The Vow,” starring Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Three’s Company’ Movie in the Works at New Line

‘Three’s Company’ Movie in the Works at New Line
New Line is in talks to pick up the movie rights to the sitcom “Three's Company,” and has hired the writing team of Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein.

Robert Cort, whose credits include “Runaway Bride,” is attached to produce.

ABC’s “Three’s Company” aired from 1977 to 1984 and starred John Ritter, Joyce De Witt and Suzanne Somers as roommates who pretended that Ritter’s character was gay in order to placate their hard-nosed landlord, played by Norman Fell. Somers left the series in the fifth season and was replaced by Jenilee Harrison and later by Priscilla Barnes.

The show was based on the British sitcom “Man About the House.” New Line is planning to set the movie in the 1970s.

Kohn and Silverstein have collaborated with New Line on “Valentine’s Day” and “How to Be Single.” They also wrote the script for the love story “The Vow,” starring Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

They're Planning A "Three's Company" Film

New Line Cinema is in talks to pick up the film rights to classic late 1970s sitcom "Three's Company".

The original, a remake British sitcom "Man About the House," starred John Ritter, Joyce De Witt and Suzanne Somers. The trio played roommates who pretended that Ritter's character was gay in order to placate their hard-nosed landlord (Norman Fell).

"Valentine's Day" and "The Vow" scribes Abby Kohn and Marc Silverstein have been hired to pen the script for the film which will retain the 1970s setting of the original. Robert Cort will produce.

Source: THR
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Michael Wolff: Why Is the U.K.'s ITV on a Hollywood Buying Spree?

Michael Wolff: Why Is the U.K.'s ITV on a Hollywood Buying Spree?
This story first appeared in the May 15 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. To receive the magazine, click here to subscribe. ITV, Britain's largest commercial television group, always has offered schlock TV — the precursor to Three's Company, called Man About the House, for instance, originated there. Vast, popular, lowest-common-denominator shows earned ITV big ad dollars and, for nearly half a century, Britain's biggest audience. Now, more aggressively than many of its broadcast competitors, ITV seems to be either a shrewd market leader or an out-of-control spender in an effort to outrun the end of

read more
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

First guests announced for McM Comic Con / Memorabilia Birmingham

Whether you’re into Doctor Who and Star Wars or The Wire and Sherlock, there’s a great line-up of special guests coming to the NEC on 22-23 March for McM Birmingham Comic Con and Memorabilia. Here are just a few of them!

British actor, writer and director Phil Davis has appeared in a host of top TV shows including Whitechapel; Sherlock, Being Human, Merlin and Doctor Who, while his movie credits include Alien 3, Quadrophenia, Notes On A Scandal, Secrets & Lies and Vera Drake, for which he was BAFTA-nominated. Paul McGann – Famous for playing the Eighth Doctor in the 1996 Doctor Who television film – a role he reprised in 72 audio dramas and the 2013 mini-episode ‘The Night of the Doctor’ – and for starring alongside Richard E. Grant in much-loved 1987 black comedy Withnail And I. Clarke Peters – Best known as detective Lester Freamon in acclaimed crime drama The Wire, as well as
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

Arts preview 2014: comebacks

  • The Guardian - TV News
From Johnny Cash to Angela Lansbury, expect to see some familiar faces in the coming year

Pop

The lost Johnny Cash gets released

According to Cash's son John, the country legend was a prolific hoarder, hanging on to everything from original audio tapes for The Johnny Cash Show to "a camel saddle gift from the prince of Saudi Arabia". That explains why it's taken several years since his death in 2003 for anyone to find Out Among the Stars, an album he recorded in the early 1980s. Columbia dismissed the album as not worth releasing, but John Cash describes the 12 tracks – which include a duet with Johnny's wife, June Carter – as "beautiful". 24 March.

Theatre

Hairspray

Barely has the set for a blistering revival of Chicago been cleared away than director Paul Kerryson sets about reinventing this joyous musical, inspired by John Waters's cult movie. It's a show that mixes the heart-rending and the hair-curling,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Arts preview 2014: comebacks

  • The Guardian - Film News
From Johnny Cash to Angela Lansbury, expect to see some familiar faces in the coming year

Pop

The lost Johnny Cash gets released

According to Cash's son John, the country legend was a prolific hoarder, hanging on to everything from original audio tapes for The Johnny Cash Show to "a camel saddle gift from the prince of Saudi Arabia". That explains why it's taken several years since his death in 2003 for anyone to find Out Among the Stars, an album he recorded in the early 1980s. Columbia dismissed the album as not worth releasing, but John Cash describes the 12 tracks – which include a duet with Johnny's wife, June Carter – as "beautiful". 24 March.

Theatre

Hairspray

Barely has the set for a blistering revival of Chicago been cleared away than director Paul Kerryson sets about reinventing this joyous musical, inspired by John Waters's cult movie. It's a show that mixes the heart-rending and the hair-curling,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Two Girls, One Guy, (but no pizza place)

Three’s Company was the ‘Friends’ of its day; a sit-com about three twenty-somethings sharing an apartment in Santa Monica California going through the ups and downs of life for the singles set of the late 70s. The American version of the UK show ‘Man About the House’, Tc was considered a groundbreaking show. Hard to believe just over 30 years ago men and women living under one roof as platonic friends was not only a novel idea for television, but a shocking and controversial premise. Juvenile jokes, double-entendres, and ridiculous plot-lines were all part of the fun, but Tc was also a true reflection of the shifting morals and values of young America arriving in the last days of disco and jiggle TV.

Several pilots were made with different actors before John Ritter, Joyce Dewitt and Suzanne Somers were selected to play the roommates we came to know and love.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Greatest TV Pilots: Three’s Company, “A Man About the House”

Three’s Company, “A Man About the House

Written by Johnnie Mortimer, Brian Cooke, Don Nicholl, Michael Ross, Bernard West,

Directed by Bill Hobin

Aired March 15th, 1977 on ABC

Three’s Company was the ‘Friends’ of its day; a sit-com about three twenty-somethings sharing an apartment in Santa Monica California going through the ups and downs of life for the singles set of the late 70s. The American version of the UK show ‘Man About the House’, Tc was considered a groundbreaking show. Hard to believe just over 30 years ago men and women living under one roof as platonic friends was not only a novel idea for television, but a shocking and controversial premise. Juvenile jokes, double-entendres, and ridiculous plotlines were all part of the fun, but Tc was also a true reflection of the shifting morals and values of young America arriving in the last days of disco and jiggle TV.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Are TV’s American Remakes Of Foreign Series Getting Excessive?

By Rachel Bennett

Television Editor & Columnist

***

Sunday night was the season two premiere of Showtime’s Homeland, and among my 12 reasons why you should tune in to the political drama, one is because it’s a foreign remake that works.

In case you missed it, Homeland is an American adaptation of the 2010 Israeli series Hatufim (Prisoners of War). “Both shows are very similar in the fact that they raise very relevant and timely questions in their societies,” says Homeland executive producer Gideon Raff, who also created Prisoners of War. Prisoners of War is a drama that follows soldiers as they readjust to their society in addition to the people who question the truth of their service.

However, Homeland is not an exact copy of Prisoners of War. The Showtime series features the overhanging threat of terrorism after 9/11, personified in character Sgt. Nicholas Brody (Damian Lewis). This change in crafting Homeland
See full article at Scott Feinberg »

15 British Sitcoms That Americans Loved the Most

While not all of the American populace purports to always understand British humor, it’s been an indelible part of the cultural landscape for decades. Whether the sophisticated stylings of Noel Coward or the outrageous offerings of French & Saunders, British television comedies (aka Britcoms) have provided countless hours of entertainment to legions of fans, and have even occasionally been adapted into historic mega-smashes (without ‘Til Death Us Do Part and Man About the House, we’d never have seen the likes of All in the Family and Three’s Company, after all). Fifteen of those shows will always immediately spring to mind and provide copious memories of cherished moments in front of the tube (or the telly, as it were).

15. To the Manor Born (1979-81)

Formulaic though it may have been (widowed aristocrat gives up ancestral estate after purchase by a supermarket magnate of Bratislavic descent, and moves with butler
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

A movie version of Dad's Army?

You may find the new Ben Stiller movie The Watch strangely familiar. But that's not necessarily a good thing

You might be forgiven for thinking that you've seen The Watch before. Not because Ben Stiller's character is the same uptight blowhard that he has played in everything for the past 15 years, or because Richard Ayoade is basically just Moss from The It Crowd again, or because Vince Vaughn remains content to sit back and bibble out the same directionless patter that has been his stock in trade for what seems like centuries.

No. The reason is because, once you've scraped away all the sex jokes and clanging Costco product placement, you're basically left with Dad's Army. Both are essentially stories about a group of ill-prepared middle-aged incompetents trying to escape the monotony of their day-to-day lives by fudging together a defence against an enemy they don't fully understand. With The Watch,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Is The Watch just a movie version of Dad's Army?

You may find the new Ben Stiller movie The Watch strangely familiar. But that's not necessarily a good thing

You might be forgiven for thinking that you've seen The Watch before. Not because Ben Stiller's character is the same uptight blowhard that he has played in everything for the past 15 years, or because Richard Ayoade is basically just Moss from The It Crowd again, or because Vince Vaughn remains content to sit back and bibble out the same directionless patter that has been his stock in trade for what seems like centuries.

No. The reason is because, once you've scraped away all the sex jokes and clanging Costco product placement, you're basically left with Dad's Army. Both are essentially stories about a group of ill-prepared middle-aged incompetents trying to escape the monotony of their day-to-day lives by fudging together a defence against an enemy they don't fully understand. With The Watch,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Six to watch: TV flatmates

From Not Going Out's flatmate from hell Lee Mack, to Peep Show's Mark and Jez, and the Friends cast – we run down our favourite TV flatmates. Have we missed any out?

Friday nights are fast turning into something of a one-man show for Lee Mack. Not only is he appearing once more with Rob Brydon and co as one of the regular panelists BBC1's Would I Lie to You but he's also back playing a fictionalised version of himself in Not Going Out. In the deliciously silly sitcom, Mack plays an ageing slacker who's got a decent case for claiming to be one of the worst fictional flatmates to have graced the small screen. But he's got stiff competition. The schedules have played host to a gaggle of rent-sharers down the years, but who has done it best? From psychopathic squatters to rib-ticklingly funny roomies, join us as
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Doctor Who complete reviews: Revelation Of The Daleks

In 1985, things were not looking so good for Doctor Who. The show was to be put on ice for 18 months in the wake of controversial storylines and supposedly poor viewing figures – all tosh of course, especially when you think that the programme was still pulling viewing figures of about seven million – a perfectly respectable number.

So The Doctor doesn't get to take Peri to Blackpool – well, on screen, at least. And unlike previous years, there were no more customary Who repeats in the summer to mollify the fans. 18 months, as I've said, isn't such a long time by today's standards, but back in 1985, you can understand why fans were weeping into their scarves. The crisis was so bad that the infamously bad 'Doctor In Distress' record was hastily assembled. The so-called supergroup of Who Cares actually comprised Colin Baker, Nicola Bryant, Nicholas Courtney and Anthony Ainley, along with Faith Brown,
See full article at Shadowlocked »
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