7.7/10
118
6 user 4 critic

A War of Children (1972)

Two families in Belfast, one Protestant and one Catholic, find that their long-standing friendship is threatened by the escalating sectarian violence that surrounds them.

Director:

George Schaefer

Writer:

James Costigan
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Vivien Merchant ... Nora Tomelty
Jenny Agutter ... Maureen Tomelty
John Ronane John Ronane ... Frank Tomelty
Anthony Andrews ... Reg Hogg
Oliver Maguire Oliver Maguire ... Ian McCullum
Aideen O'Kelly Aideen O'Kelly ... Meg McCullum
Danny Figgis Danny Figgis ... Donal Tomelty
David G. Meredith David G. Meredith ... Robbie McCullum
Patrick Dawson Patrick Dawson ... Seamus Lynch
Cathleen Delany Cathleen Delany ... Mrs. Doyle (as Cathleen Delaney)
Maura Keeley Maura Keeley ... Woman in Shop
Arthur O'Sullivan Arthur O'Sullivan ... Mr. Fiske
Des Nealon Des Nealon ... British Lieutenant (as Desmond Nealon)
Pat Laffan ... British Soldier
Conor Evans Conor Evans ... British Soldier
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Storyline

Two families in Belfast, one Protestant and one Catholic, find that their long-standing friendship is threatened by the escalating sectarian violence that surrounds them. Written by frankfob2@yahoo.com

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

5 December 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Ein Krieg der Kinder See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Tomorrow Entertainment See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in The 30th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards (1978) See more »

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User Reviews

 
See it - for a laugh
26 December 2006 | by amurray-5See all my reviews

I watched this film in 1973, in Dublin, as I waited for a flight to New York. It was laughable on every level. Firstly, the accents were all over the place. Those that actually sounded Irish wandered at least 100 miles south of Belfast; well into the Republic of Ireland. The acting was stage Oirish at its worst. Plotting was sublimely inauthentic, with Anthony Andrews' soldier borrowing military vehicles to visit Jenny Agutter up the Falls Road; acts which would have brought his romance to an abrupt end. The IRA prisoners were rescued from the evil Brits when an ancient crone, straight from the potato famine, teleported into the late 20th century and stepped out in front of the armed convoy, responding to the imperious complaint of the chief Brit with the immortal line "Sorry yer honour".

The location shots were so obviously Dublin, right down to the green corporation buses, that when Anthony Andrews left the post-coital bed in his rented love nest, opened the curtains and said, "You can see the river from here", a loud Dublin voice shouted "It's probably the ****** Liffey!" He brought the house down.

See it for a laugh. Thirty three years later, it's still fresh in this viewer's mind.


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