At his mother's funeral, stuffy bank clerk Henry Pulling (Alec McCowen) meets his Aunt Augusta Bertram (Dame Maggie Smith), an elderly eccentric with more-than-shady dealings who pulls him ... See full summary »

Director:

George Cukor

Writers:

Jay Presson Allen (screenplay), Hugh Wheeler (screenplay) | 1 more credit »
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Won 1 Oscar. Another 10 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Maggie Smith ... Aunt Augusta
Alec McCowen ... Henry
Louis Gossett Jr. ... Wordsworth (as Lou Gossett)
Robert Stephens ... Visconti
Cindy Williams ... Tooley
Robert Flemyng ... Crowder
José Luis López Vázquez ... Dambreuse (as Jose Luis Lopez Vazquez)
Raymond Gérôme Raymond Gérôme ... Mario (as Raymond Gerome)
Daniel Emilfork ... Hakim
Corinne Marchand ... Louise
John Hamill ... Crowder's Man
David Swift ... Detective
Bernard Holley ... Bobby
Valerie White ... Madame Dambreuse
Antonio Pica ... Elegant Man
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Storyline

At his mother's funeral, stuffy bank clerk Henry Pulling (Alec McCowen) meets his Aunt Augusta Bertram (Dame Maggie Smith), an elderly eccentric with more-than-shady dealings who pulls him along on a whirlwind adventure as she attempts to rescue an old lover. Written by Kathy Li

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The story of a Fabulous Dame who brought Style, Class, Grace and Beauty to Smuggling, Hustling, Gambling and Swindling

Genres:

Adventure | Comedy

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Source novel author Graham Greene said that he hated the movie, though he admitted that he walked out after five minutes. See more »

Goofs

In the bar, the two women dressed in red and black are at the bar, then at a table, then back at the bar, all in a matter of seconds. See more »

Quotes

Henry Pulling: I have been used, shamefully used. I have stolen nothing, I have done nothing wrong!
Aunt Augusta: 'I have done nothing wrong.' You have done nothing at all! Nothing, absolutely nothing! Huh huh, my poor Henry, you have lived so... ooh so... *meagerly*.
Henry Pulling: Wha... what you call living, all your immorality - the thieving, conniving, lying... all those men! 'La qu Indochine' - and Tooley told me what it meant: 'La qu Indochine' - a circuit of whore houses! I know what you were! My God. 'Mama Mia, Mama Mia!' I can ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The painting of Augusta seen behind the opening credits winks to the audience as the credits end. See more »

Connections

Referenced in NYPD Blue: Travels with Andy (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

Serenade of Love
Lyrics by Jackie Trent
Music by Tony Hatch
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User Reviews

 
Magnificent Maggie as Alec McCowen's Auntie Mame
6 July 2006 | by dglinkSee all my reviews

Dull stuffy bachelor meets flamboyant eccentric aunt, who seeks to show him the world's pleasures. Sound familiar? While based on a Graham Greene novel, "Travels with My Aunt" plays on screen like a subdued version of "Auntie Mame." Unlike the rowdy broadness of the Patrick Dennis play and the Rosalind Russell film, George Cukor's adaptation of the Greene work tries to be high-toned and literary, while simultaneously striving to seem madcap and funny. Unfortunately, the film succeeds more in its pretentiousness than it does in its comedy.

Alec McCowen is fine as Henry Pulling, the bank clerk who fusses with dahlias in his spare time and fumes prissily when cannabis is mixed with the ashes of his mother. Henry is a prime candidate for an Auntie Mame, although he's a bit beyond his formative years. Henry's out-of-character dalliance aboard the Orient Express with Cindy Williams, as a young drifter on her way to Katmandu, should have been cut. The tryst adds nothing to the plot and only confuses perceptions about Henry. Maggie Smith, at times stunningly garbed in luscious gowns by Anthony Powell, plays Aunt Augusta for all she's worth, and Maggie is certainly worth a great deal. Although the actress is clearly too old to play the younger Augusta and too young, even with the age makeup, to play the elder woman, Smith is always fascinating to watch. Despite her mannerisms, which at times overwhelm the characterization, Smith is generally convincing and should have taken a shot at playing Mame Dennis in either the comedy or the musical version of "Auntie Mame."

Although "Travels with My Aunt" was beautifully filmed by Douglas Slocombe against scenic splendor that stretches from Istanbul to Venice to Spain, the pace is often sluggish, and the plot preposterous. The proceedings are propelled by Augusta's need to raise the ransom money to rescue a former lover, whose minor appendages are being sent to her one by one as a warning. However, coincidences abound, plot holes deepen, and threads are left hanging all over. Without McCowen and Smith, the film would be little more than a stylish, if soporific, travelogue.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | French | Italian

Release Date:

22 February 1973 (Australia) See more »

Also Known As:

Travels with My Aunt See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$529,626
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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