Roma (1972) - News Poster

(1972)

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The Furniture: Who Should Win the Emmys for Production Design

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Last year, I made a pitch to the Academy of Television Arts and Science on the subject of production design. Hopefully you also remember that amazing table tennis parlor from Penny Dreadful. But what you might not remember is that not a single one of the nominees I recommended actually won. Not even Lemonade, about which I am still annoyed.

But here I am, one year later, trying again. Here’s who should win each of the five production design Emmys. (At least Game of Thrones isn’t eligible this year, or they’d be winning for the fourth year in a row.)

Outstanding Production Design for a Narrative Contemporary or Fantasy Program (One Hour or More)

The Young Pope is almost dizzyingly lush. It’s here as a “contemporary” program,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Roberto Rossellini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero: Filmed mostly on the streets in newly-liberated territory, Roberto Rossellini’s gripping war-related shows are blessed with new restorations but still reflect their rough origins. The second picture, the greater masterpiece, looks as if it were improvised out of sheer artistic will.

Roberto Rosselini’s War Trilogy

Rome Open City, Paisan, Germany Year Zero

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 500 (497, 498, 499)

1945-1948 / B&W / 1:37 & 1:33 flat full frame / 302 minutes / Street Date July 11, 2017 / available from the Criterion Collection 79.96

Starring: Aldo Fabrizi, Anna Magnani; Dots Johnson, Harriet White Medin; Edmund Moeschke, Franz-Otto Krüger.

Cinematography: Ubaldo Arata; Otello Martelli; Robert Julliard.

Film Editor: Eraldo Da Roma

Original Music: Renzo Rossellini

Written by Sergio Amidei, Alberto Consiglio, Federico Fellini; Klaus Mann, Marcello Pagliero, Alfred Hayes, Vasco Pratolini; Max Kolpé, Carlo Lizzani.

Directed by Roberto Rossellini

Criterion released an identical-for-content DVD set of this trilogy in 2010; the new Blu-ray
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Giallo Norms and Deviations: Close-up on "Deep Red" and "The Strange Color of Your Body’s Tears"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani's The Strange Colour of Your Body's Tears (2013) is showing February 4 - March 6 and Dario Argento's Deep Red (1975) is showing February 5 - March 7, 2017 in the United Kingdom in the double feature Giallo/Meta Giallo.“I know it when I see it.” Like film noir, the giallo is one of those genres as easy to pin down as it is difficult to define. More often than not, what constitutes a giallo rests on a given film’s balance of emblematic imagery and an archetypal storyline, while other factors like tone, score, and setting will also play a part in its classification. Arguably no filmmaker has had a more stylish and deftly rigorous hand in establishing these defining traits than Dario Argento. And his 1975 film, Deep Red (Profondo Rosso), is perhaps as good as it gets,
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Scorsese Docs, Leonard Cohen, Social Thrillers & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Scorsese retrospective has a music-filled weekend with The Last Waltz, his George Harrison documentary, and more.

Anthology Film Archives

The late, great Leonard Cohen is paid tribute with a small retrospective that includes Fassbinder’s Beware of a Holy Whore and McCabe and Mrs. Miller.

Jean Vigo’s masterpiece L’Atalante has showings.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Anatahan,’ ‘The King of Comedy,’ ‘Wavelength’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

The restoration of Josef von Sternberg’s Anatahan, about which more here, is now playing. Fellini’s Roma also shows on Friday.

Hitchcock, Lucas, and more are highlighted in a ’70s Universal series.

The Land Before Time plays on Saturday.

Museum of the Moving Image

The Martin Scorsese retro continues with The King of Comedy and Taxi Driver.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Blu-ray Review: Criterion Goes Far With Federico Fellini's Roma

When it comes to Federico Fellini's Roma, it's difficult to determine what's more self-indulgent, the act of appropriating by name a vital, ancient city that's been on the global forefront of politics, religion and culture, or this entire film in general. Of course, those with any familiarity whatsoever with Fellini's work understand that self-indulgence is the expected crux of all of his work. And why shouldn't it be? For a man who effectively re-crafted the art of commercial narrative filmmaking into personal art projects (no smuggling required), Fellini of all people had, by this point, earned such opportunities. Although lesser known and lesser discussed than his canonized masterpieces such as La Strada (1954) or 8 1/2 (1963), Roma (1972) is an indispensable late career surge...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Joshua Reviews Federico Fellini’s Roma [Criterion Collection Blu-ray Review]

From, literally, the film’s opening title cards, Roma announces itself as something of a visual feast. A blood-red screen introduces us to the proceedings, with the four letters making up the Italian name for the nation’s capital of Rome fading in in all of their grand, pitch black glory. It’s a bombastic introduction to one of director Federico Fellini’s most esoteric and yet deeply personal motion pictures.

Also known in some circles as Fellini’s Roma, film critic Vincent Canby was right in suggesting that that specific title might be the real way we should look at this picture. While taking the title from the real capital city of Italy, this is not a Rome anyone recognizes at first glance. Seemingly a journey through the streets of a Rome from a universe just adjacent to ours, Fellini all but neglects anything truly resembling a coherent narrative,
See full article at CriterionCast »

Nejjar, Breish and Arraf secure Doha Film Institute grants

Nejjar, Breish and Arraf secure Doha Film Institute grants
Qatar’s Doha Film Institute (Dfi) backs 32 projects in autumn funding round.

Moroccan filmmaker Narjiss Nejjar (Cry No More), Lebanon’s Bassem Breish and Palestinian director Suha Arraf (Villa Touma, pictured) are among the latest recipients of the Doha Film Institute’s grants programme aimed at first and second-time film-makers in the Middle East and Africa region.

The Qatari organization backed a total 32 projects from 27 countries in its autumn funding round.

Nejjar received support for upcoming film Stateless about a girl who will do anything to re-connect with her mother, including marry an aging, blind man.

Breish is working on The Maiden’s Pond, about two woman connected to the same man who need to find a way of living side by side in the same village.

Arraf, whose last film was Villa Touma, is currently working on The Poster, about a Palestinian village situated within Israeli borders which is stirred up when a controversial poster appears
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Federico Fellini’s Roma

Federico Fellini’s best non-narrative feature is an intoxicating meta-travelogue, not just of the Eternal City but the director’s idea of Rome past and present. The masterful images alternate between nostalgic vulgarity and dreamy timelessness. Criterion’s disc is a new restoration.

Fellini’s Roma

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 848

1972 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 120 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date December 13, 2016 / 39.95

Starring Peter Gonzales, Fiona Florence, Pia De Doses, Renato Giovannoli, Dennis Christopher, Feodor Chaliapin Jr., Elliott Murphy, Anna Magnani, Gore Vidal, Federico Fellini.

Cinematography Giuseppe Rotunno

Film Editor Ruggero Mastroianni

Original Music Nino Rota

Written by Federico Fellini and Bernardino Zapponi

Produced by Turi Vasile

Directed by Federico Fellini

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Federico Fellini stopped making standard narrative pictures after 1960’s La dolce vita; from then on his films skewed toward various forms of experimentation and expressions of his own state of mind. Most did have a story to some degree,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Review: Fellini's "Roma" (1972) Criterion Blu-ray Special Edition

  • CinemaRetro
“Roman Holiday?”

By Raymond Benson

One of the great director Federico Fellini’s more curious motion pictures is his 1972 part-documentary/part-fictional collage that consists of “impressions” of Rome, both past and present. In many ways, it is the middle chapter of a trilogy that comprises Fellini Satyricon (1969) and Amarcord (1973), although not many film historians view them as such.

Roma is a love letter, so to speak, to Italy’s capital city. The film takes place in three time periods—sometime during the 1930s, the war years, and the present (i.e., 1971-72, when the movie was made). It is also very much a product of its time, when the counter-culture movement was still in full swing. The modern sequences of Roma are populated by “hippies” and long-haired youth, as well as motorcyclists, intellectuals (Gore Vidal makes an appearance as himself), and Fellini as himself. The sequences cut back and forth
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Newswire: Here’s what’s coming to The Criterion Collection this December

Here at The A.V. Club, we recognize the realities of contemporary movie-watching, and so we try to keep you updated on what’s coming to and going from the major streaming services each month. But we also like to nerd out on deluxe Blu-ray editions of classic films. Therefore, welcome to the first of a series of monthly dispatches on what’s coming soon from The Criterion Collection. This fall’s slate of Criterion releases included some odd and exciting picks, like Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls and the Lone Wolf And Cub boxed set. But December’s picks, while still exciting, are more conventional (i.e., highbrow) Criterion fare.

First, there’s a Blu-ray edition of Frederico Fellini’s 1972 love letter to his home city, Roma. Currently out of print and available only on an expensive import Blu-ray, Roma blends documentary and Fellini’s signature flights ...
See full article at The AV Club »

Criterion in December 2016: The Exterminating Angel, The Asphalt Jungle, Roma and Heart Of A Dog

What do cinephiles dream about during the holiday season? According to the Criteiron Collection, it's all about classic films, such as John Huston's galvanic The Asphalt Jungle and Luis Buñuel's eye-raising comedy The Exterminating Angel. And contemporary titles, like Heart of a Dog, the first feature by Laurie Anderson in some 30 years. Plus, Fellini's Roma! Read on for all the details, provided by the fine folks at Criterion. The Exterminating Angel A group of high-society friends are invited to a mansion for dinner and inexplicably find themselves unable to leave in The Exterminating Angel (El ángel exterminador), a daring masterpiece from Luis Buñuel (Belle de jour, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie). Made just one year after his international sensationViridiana, this film, full of...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Criterion Collection Announces December Titles: ‘Heart of a Dog,’ ‘The Exterminating Angel’ and More

  • Indiewire
The Criterion Collection Announces December Titles: ‘Heart of a Dog,’ ‘The Exterminating Angel’ and More
The Criterion Collection has announced its offerings for the last month of the year, with one contemporary title (“Heart of a Dog”) mixed in with the classic (“Roma,” “The Asphalt Jungle,” “The Exterminating Angel”) fare. Check out the covers for the new additions below, as well as synopses for each carefully chosen film.

Read More: Kieslowski, ‘Cat People,’ and the Coen Brothers Lead The Criterion Collection’s September Line-Up

The Exterminating Angel

A group of high-society friends are invited to a mansion for dinner and inexplicably find themselves unable to leave in “The Exterminating Angel” (“El ángel exterminador”), a daring masterpiece from Luis Buñuel (“Belle de jour,” “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie”). Made just one year after his international sensation “Viridiana,” this film, full of eerie, comic absurdity, furthers Buñuel’s wicked takedown of the rituals and dependencies of the frivolous upper classes.

Heart of a Dog

Heart of a Dog
See full article at Indiewire »

Federico Fellini’s ‘Roma,’ John Huston’s ‘Asphalt Jungle’ & More Coming To Criterion In December

While you likely already saved your money to buy The Criterion Collection‘s boxset for Krzysztof Kieslowski‘s masterpiece “Dekalog“ this month, the boutique label doesn’t make it easy to be a cinephile on a budget. And their December lineup certainly looks poised to break a few wallets (while randomly revealing one title for February).

Kicking things off is Federico Fellini‘s “Roma,” with the master filmmaker’s 1972 movie newly-restored, to provide an even more breathtaking look at his love letter to the city.

Continue reading Federico Fellini’s ‘Roma,’ John Huston’s ‘Asphalt Jungle’ & More Coming To Criterion In December at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

NYC Weekend Watch: Hitchcock-Grant, Double Features, Fellini & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Alfred Hitchcock and Cary Grant‘s collaborations are highlighted in a series that brings Notorious, Suspicion, and To Catch a Thief on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, respectively.

Prints of Max OphülsLetter from an Unknown Woman and Alan Arkin‘s Little Murders play on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

A print of James and the Giant Peach
See full article at The Film Stage »

'Terror 5', 'Downhill' triumph at Blood Window

  • ScreenDaily
'Terror 5', 'Downhill' triumph at Blood Window
The Roma Lazio Film Commission colour correction and sound mixing 5.1 award has gone to Veronica (Mexico) by Carlos Algara and Alejandro Martinez Beltrán under the auspices of Ventana Sur’s genre sidebar.

The Sofía Films colour correction and visual effects supervising award was presented at the awards ceremony in Buenos Aires last week to Laura Casabé for La Valija De Benavidez (Argentina), which began life as a pitch at the market three years ago.

The same film earned the Morbido Film Festival award for opening credits design and pay-tv distribution for a second and third window for Latin America.

The Morbido Film Festival’s poster design for a film award went to Federico and Sebastián Rotstein’s Terror 5 (Argentina).

Terror 5 also collected the Full Dimensional post-production and 2D-to-3D conversion package for a teaser, sound mixing 7.1, sound effects, foley and visual effects supervision.

The Labo Digital award for a Thx-certified sound mixing 5.1 package went to
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Scott Reviews Federico Fellini’s Fellini-Satyricon [Masters of Cinema Blu-ray Review]

By the late 1960s, Federico Fellini had more or less permanently transitioned from filmmaker to icon. The autobiographical 8½ basically ensured his films would be permanently inseparable from himself, the sort of commercial accomplishment of which most film directors can only dream. Most directors are fortunate to be recognized for putting their “touch” into an accepted format. Fellini was the format. His follow-up, Juliet of the Spirits, is an equally indulgent affair that serves loosely as an apology to his wife (Giulietta Masina, who also stars in the film), on whom he cheated for more or less the entirety of their marriage; the resulting film is as much his fantasy (sexual extravagance) as hers (Masina had a keen interest in the psychic realm). And so the template is set – Fellini would continue to make films about himself, but largely under the guise of someone else’s perspective.

He wasn’t shy
See full article at CriterionCast »

Mariah Carey Gets Cozy With Billionaire James Packer in Capri, Italy: Photos

Mariah Carey Gets Cozy With Billionaire James Packer in Capri, Italy: Photos
It's truly the emancipation of Mimi! Singing sensation Mariah Carey was photographed this past weekend vacationing on the luxurious island of Capri, Italy, with her new romantic interest, billionaire James Packer. The mother of twins was snapped clutching hands with Packer, the fourth richest man in Australia, outside of the Pasticceria Da Alberto on the Via Roma, this past Friday, June 19. Other vacation snaps featured the pair alone on a speedboat, enjoying the crystal clear waters of the Tyrrhenian Sea. For the oceanic jaunt on Monday, June [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

One of the Most Influential Films Ever Made at London's BFI Southbank

‘Rome, Open City’ movie returns: 4K digital restoration of Roberto Rossellini masterpiece at London’s BFI Southbank (photo: Anna Magnani in ‘Rome, Open City’) A restored digital print of Roberto Rossellini’s best-known film, Rome, Open City / Roma, città aperta is currently enjoying an extended run — until April 5, 2014 — at London’s BFI Southbank. Inspired by real-life events and made right after the liberation of Rome, Rome, Open City stars Aldo Fabrizi, Anna Magnani, Marcello Pagliero, and Maria Michi. Though not a local box office hit at the time of its release, Rome, Open City, shot with a minuscule budget in the ravaged streets of Rome, became one of the most influential movies ever made. Its raw look, "documentary" feel, and scenes shot on location (though studio sets were used as well) inspired not only other Italian directors of the post-war years, but filmmakers everywhere, including those in Hollywood (e.g.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Movie Review - Rome, Open City (1945)

Rome, Open City (Italian: Roma, città aperta), 1945.

Directed by Roberto Rossellini.

Starring Anna Magnani, Aldo Fabrizi, Marcello Pagliero, Francesco Grandjacquet, Maria Michi and Vito Annichiarico.

Synopsis:

Roberto Rossellini directs this 1940s drama about the last days of the Nazi occupation of Italy during World War II. Resistance leader Giorgio Manfredi flees the Gestapo and seeks a place to hide with the help of his friend Francesco , his pregnant fiancée Pina and the priest who is due to marry them, Don Pietro Pellegrini. Giorgio's ex-girlfriend Marina betrays him and his fellow fighters to the Gestapo in order to get her hands on some luxury items and it's not long before the Nazis and the local police find him and Don Pietro. They are captured and tortured but will they crack under the pain or be executed for their silence?

“Life is mean and dirty” says Marina, a conflicted woman who has
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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