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The Way of the Dragon (1972)

Meng long guo jiang (original title)
A man visits his relatives at their restaurant in Italy and has to help them defend against brutal gangsters harassing them.

Director:

Bruce Lee

Writer:

Bruce Lee (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
4,309 ( 702)

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Cast

Credited cast:
Bruce Lee ... Tang Lung
Nora Miao ... Chen Ching Hua
Chuck Norris ... Colt
Ping Ou Wei ... Ho (as Paul Wei Ping-Ao)
Chung-Hsin Huang Chung-Hsin Huang ... 'Uncle' Wang (as Wang Chung Hsin)
Robert Wall ... Bob
Ing-Sik Whang Ing-Sik Whang ... Japanese Fighter
Ti Chin ... Ah Quen
Tony Liu ... Tony
Little Unicorn ... Jimmy
Malisa Longo ... Italian Beauty
Ngan Wu Ngan Wu ... Waiter
Fu Ching Chen Fu Ching Chen ... Robert (as Robert Chen)
Jon T. Benn Jon T. Benn ... The Boss
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Kenny John Kenny ... Quen (voice)
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Storyline

Tang Lung arrives in Rome to help his cousins in the restaurant business. They are being pressured to sell their property to the syndicate, who will stop at nothing to get what they want. When Tang arrives he poses a new threat to the syndicate, and they are unable to defeat him. The syndicate boss hires the best Japanese and European martial artists to fight Tang, but he easily finishes them off. The American martial artist Colt is hired and has a showdown with Tang in Rome's famous Colosseum. Written by Darryl Schneider <fish2@datanet.ab.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

MAN, CAN WE USE HIM NOW! Bruce Lee is back in the fantastic all new adventures of the Super Hero from "Enter the Dragon..." ..his last performance is his best! See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Miramax [United States]

Country:

Hong Kong | Italy

Language:

Mandarin | Cantonese | English | Italian

Release Date:

14 August 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Return of the Dragon See more »

Filming Locations:

Via Vittorio Veneto, Rome Italy See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$130,000 (estimated)

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$1,157,316, 6 August 1975
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended) | (censored)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bruce Lee also played percussion on the music for the soundtrack. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the movie, Bruce Lee is eating several different types of soups and several times he takes a spoonful of an orange colored soup and as he puts it into his mouth some dribbles on his chin. The soup he dribbles on his chin is white. See more »

Quotes

Tony: [after being stabbed by Uncle Wang] Uncle Wang, why did you...?
'Uncle' Wang: Don't blame me for all of this. The blame is on Ah-Lung. He stirred up this trouble, the fool!
Tony: What does this... what does this mean?
'Uncle' Wang: What does this mean? You must know. I've worked hard all of my life. And I've got nothing at all to show for it! My own wife and children are waiting for me in Hong Kong. If the restaurant cooperates, they'll pay me well for all of this. After that I can go back to Hong Kong a rich man. So you see, I ...
[...]
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Alternate Versions

The Japanese theatrical cut, released in 1974, was a unique hybrid, in that it was dubbed in English, yet maintained Bruce Lee's real fight yells. For some unknown reason, all other English dubbed prints featured a "yell double" for Bruce Lee (save for the final fight, in some prints). Aside from this, the music was also slightly altered to feature vocal versions of the opening and ending themes (sung by Mike Remedios), as well as featuring an extra music cue, "The Big Guy", during Lee's fight against Bob Wall and Whang In Sik. This audio track was used as an audio option on both the 2012 "Extreme Edition" Japanese Blu-ray and the 2013 American Shout Factory Blu-ray and DVD. In January 2017, within the commemoration of the 45th anniversary of the film, the so-called "Ultimate Edition" Japanese Blu-Ray release contains not only the original audio track from the Japanese theatrical cut; it also includes the original Japanese theatrical cut in HD restored from original negative (without burnt-in Japanese subtitles) for the first time in any home video format around the world. See more »

Connections

Referenced in You Know What's Bullshit: DVDs (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

As A Judgement
(Colt's Theme)
by Ennio Morricone
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »

User Reviews

 
Adorable mixture of silly slapstick and ritual violence.
23 August 1999 | by alice liddellSee all my reviews

If, like me, you have only seen Bruce Lee in the wonderful, but portentous, ENTER THE DRAGON, than you might be surprised by this quite potty earlier film. In ENTER THE DRAGON, Lee was amused, but sombre; a fighting machine, pivotal piece in a deadly serious mythological puzzle, his strength never in doubt.

The first third of this film couldn't be more different. Played as (very funny) comedy, Lee is passive (we first see him waiting for someone), a figure of fun, a fish out of water, exagerratedly polite, bewildered by alien custom and language, as well as his own bowels. A number of scuffles take part early on in which he takes no part, and which make us doubt his prowess.

Lee directed this film, and his visual conception is much more inventive that Robert Clouse's (ENTER). Although it lacks the insane invention of A TOUCH OF ZEN, or the dizzy verve of Tsui Hark's films, Lee is not content with simple ego gratification. His two directorial mentors seem to be Melville and Leone. The former (hugely influenced by Oriental martial discipline himself) gave him a hero who is narcissistic (check the opening shot), whole; whose physical prowess is ironically the result of mental superiority, an almost Zen laid-backness; concealing the coiled, taut, muscle-burst of Lee's beautiful body.

Kung Fu is primarily an art of self-defense, and this film returns to these roots: its conception of protecting the oppressed rings throughout the film (in the seemingly gratuitous picture-postcard scenes, Lee makes the connection between European colonial splendour, and the poverty and repression of Hong Kong). Chuck Norris's character has betrayed Kung Fu by siding with the oppressor - his art is bestial and clumsy, lacking the spare geometric elegance of Lee's.

But Kung fu's self-defense is also a defence of one's 'self' (this is where Melville comes in) - it protects one from any threat to one's powerful wholeness, especially women (and men. There is a slight whiff of homophobia, mitigated by the outrageous campness of the film (all that red! The whole idea of SHANE recast in a restaurant!). This is ironic, since it is the proof of Lee's martial art power that makes the initially sceptical heroine (very stylish and lovely) fall for his charms (and who can blame her?).

Lee's second master is Sergio Leone, from whom he has learnt an irreverent approach to genre, with jokey zooms, close-ups and cuts; mocking, yet mournful and melancholic Morricone-esque music; a ritual stand-off between mythical archetypes (an awesome set-piece in the Colosseum), with the film's heart belonging to the slightly silly, but loveable, subsidiary characters.

The use of these iconoclastic directors adds a reflective and critical dimension to a genre previously (in its most populist form) a showcase for male vanity (although Lee never lets us forget how gorgeous and sweetly small and cuddly he is). A supremely entertaining film which unexpectedly achieves a climactic power and melancholy.


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