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Horror-Rama Toronto IV Panels to Include Night Of The Living Dead & Remembrances of George A. Romero & Bob Clark

  • DailyDead
This weekend Toronto horror fans will have plenty of opportunities to celebrate the genre's past as well as its present at Horror-Rama IV, with panels including a look back at Night of the Living Dead with co-writer John A. Russo and remembrances of both George A. Romero and Bob Clark:

Press Release: (Toronto) Horror-Rama is thrilled to welcome actress Ashley C. Williams to her Canadian convention debut!

Ashley found instant cult infamy for her tragic turn in director Tom Six's notorious black-comic horror masterpiece The Human Centipede where she was stitched rear-to-mouth as the middle segment of a mad scientist's insane experiment. In 2015 she received acclaim for her blistering turn in director Matthew A. Brown's psychological horror film Julia and both she and Brown (who will also be attending Horror-Rama 2017) will screen their masterpiece and meet their fans.

Ashley joins previously announced special guests: John Harrison (Creepshow,
See full article at DailyDead »

Robert Osborne, TCM Host and Film Historian, Dies at 84

Robert Osborne, TCM Host and Film Historian, Dies at 84
Film historian Robert Osborne, the effervescent primetime host of Turner Classic Movies since the cabler’s inception in 1994, has died. He was 84.

TCM’s general manager Jennifer Dorian released a statement saying, “All of us at Turner Classic Movies are deeply saddened by the death of Robert Osborne. Robert was a beloved member of the Turner family for more than 23 years. He joined us as an expert on classic film and grew to be our cherished colleague and esteemed ambassador for TCM. Robert was embraced by devoted fans who saw him as a trusted expert and friend. His calming presence, gentlemanly style, encyclopedic knowledge of film history, fervent support for film preservation and highly personal interviewing style all combined to make him a truly world-class host. Robert’s contributions were fundamental in shaping TCM into what it is today and we owe him a debt of gratitude that can never be repaid. Our
See full article at Variety - TV News »

The Search for Family in ‘There Will Be Blood,’ Harmony Korine’s New Ad, Music of ‘Twin Peaks’ & More

Dailies is a round-up of essential film writing, news bits, videos, and other highlights from across the Internet. If you’d like to submit a piece for consideration, get in touch with us in the comments below or on Twitter at @TheFilmStage.

Edward Yang’s little-seen The Terrorizers will get its first theatrical run at BAMcinematek from October 21 through 27.

Watch a video essay on the search for family in There Will Be Blood:

Little White LiesNick Chen on how Brian De Palma influenced the films of Noah Baumbach:

If Hitchcock is a language, then De Palma has been fluent in it for decades: Obsession is Vertigo, Body Double is Rear Window, and so on. “I was the one practitioner that took up the things he pioneered,” De Palma asserts in Baumbach’s film. Alternatively, there’s Blow Out – often deemed the most representative of his aesthetic – which
See full article at The Film Stage »

Han Solo Spinoff Film Looking To Cast Non-White Female Lead?

It's no secret that the original Star Wars trilogy is about as white as white bread. With the exception of Lando Calrissian, there isn't really a single person of color on screen (excluding James Earl Jones' voice, of course). I'm not here to demonize or hate on Lucas for that. Times were different back in the 1970s and 1980s, and what's done is done. However, with last year's Star Wars: The Force Awakens, Disney and Lucasfilm managed to diversify its cast in both sex and color.

This is a trend they are continuing with Rogue One: A Star Wars Story, which is another film with a female lead. In addition, the main cast for that film looks to be as racially diverse as could be, consisting of Chinese actor Jian Wheng, Hong Kong actor star Donnie Yen, Mexican actor Diego Luna, and British Muslim actor Riz Ahmed.

Well, it
See full article at LRM Online »

Carnival of Souls

Cinema Art from Lawrence, Kansas?   Industrial filmmaker Herk Harvey comes through with a classic horror gem for the ages. A haunted church organist begins to suspect that her hallucinations are more than just nerves. And who is that ghoulish man who keeps appearing in reflections, or popping up out of nowhere? Carnival of Souls Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 63 1962 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 78 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date July 12, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Candace Hilligoss, Frances Feist, Sidney Berger, Art Ellison, Stan Levitt, Herk Harvey. Cinematography Maurice Prather Film Editor Dan Palmquist, Bill de Jarnette Original Music Gene Moore Assistant Director Raza (Reza) Badiyi Written by John Clifford Produced and Directed by Herk Harvey

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Herk Harvey's marvelous Carnival of Souls is an anomaly in screen horror, a regional effort that transcends its production limitations to deliver a tingling encounter with the uncanny. Harvey was a prolific producer of industrial films,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Recommended Discs & Deals: ‘Only Yesterday,’ ‘The In-Laws,’ ‘Boy & the World’ & More

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Boy & the World (Alê Abreu)

Crayon-like scribblings and simple geometric patterns meticulously complicate themselves like a fractal over the course of this child’s-eye odyssey through the global struggle between humankind and the forces that oppress it. Kaleidoscopic visuals use repetition to explore the communal nature of both work and celebration. This film continually pulls back to show the larger picture of society, its visuals becoming more complex in kind, before it reduces to a more intimate view
See full article at The Film Stage »

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Pays Tribute to Female Mexican Directors, Otto Preminger

Karlovy Vary Film Festival Pays Tribute to Female Mexican Directors, Otto Preminger
London — The Karlovy Vary Intl. Film Festival, which plays July 1-9, will put the spotlight on the current generation of Mexican female directors, and also plans to run a tribute to Otto Preminger.

Festival artistic director Karel Och said: “Kviff’s special tributes will once again become an exciting meeting point between the modern and the classic. The festival will highlight the vital creativity of contemporary Mexico’s young female directors, and will remember, three decades after his passing, the visionary genius of Otto Preminger, a fellow Central European who conquered the United States with his overpowering charm and unflagging advocacy for freedom of artistic expression.“

The focus on women directors from Mexico includes nine films from the past five years. The festival highlights the founding of the Imcine film institute in 1983 as of “undeniable importance to the increase of female directors in Mexico.” It was this organization, the fest says,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

George Clayton Johnson, Writer of First ‘Star Trek’ Episode, Dies at 86

George Clayton Johnson, who wrote the script for the first “Star Trek” episode to air and co-wrote “Logan’s Run,” died Friday, Dec. 25 in the Los Angeles area following a battle with cancer, according to his son, Paul Johnson. He was 86.

He was born in Cheyenne, Wyo., in 1929. He broke into the entertainment business in 1959 when he wrote the “I’ll Take Care of You” episode for “Alfred Hitchcock Presents.”

Johnson was a member of the Southern California School of Writers, which included Theodore Sturgeon, William F. Nolan, Charles Beaumont, Richard Matheson and Ray Bradbury. He met “Twilight Zone” producer Rod Serling through them and would go on to write eight episodes for the seminal sci-fi series including “Nothing in the Dark,” “Kick the Can,” “A Game of Pool” and “A Penny for Your Thoughts.”

Johnson sold a short story that would serve as the basis for Frank Sinatra’s
See full article at Variety - TV News »

George Clayton Johnson, Writer of First ‘Star Trek’ Episode, Dies at 86

George Clayton Johnson, Writer of First ‘Star Trek’ Episode, Dies at 86
George Clayton Johnson, who wrote the script for the first “Star Trek” episode to air and co-wrote “Logan’s Run,” died Friday, Dec. 25 in the Los Angeles area following a battle with cancer. He was 86.

He was born in Cheyenne, Wyo., in 1929. He broke into the entertainment business in 1959 when he wrote the “I’ll Take Care of You” episode for “Alfred Hitchcock Presents.”

Johnson was a member of the Southern California School of Writers, which included Theodore Sturgeon, William F. Nolan, Charles Beaumont, Richard Matheson and Ray Bradbury. He met “Twilight Zone” producer Rod Serling through them and would go on to write eight episodes for the seminal sci-fi series including “Nothing in the Dark,” “Kick the Can,” “A Game of Pool” and “A Penny for Your Thoughts.”

Johnson sold a short story that would serve as the basis for Frank Sinatra’s 1960 movie “Ocean’s 11” and the George Clooney
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90
Martin E. Brooks, an actor, singer, director and writer perhaps most widely known for playing the bionic scientist Dr. Rudy Wells in the television series “The Six Million Dollar Man” and its spinoff “The Bionic Woman,” died Dec. 7 in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Brooks’ Broadway career included roles in Arthur Miller’s adaptation of Ibsen’s “Enemy of the People”; John Steinbeck’s “Burning Bright,” for which he received both the Theatre World Award and the Donaldson Award; Arch Oboler’s “Night of the Auk”; and John Van Druten’s “I Am a Camera,” for which he received a Tony nomination.

The actor also co-starred with Brian Donlevy in the national tour of Saul Levitt’s hit play “The Andersonville Trial.” Charles Durning had a featured role in that production, and as they worked together, he and Brooks forged a friendship that lasted until Durning’s death in 2012.

During his Broadway career,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90

Martin E. Brooks, Who Played Dr. Rudy Wells on ‘Six Million Dollar Man,’ Dies at 90
Martin E. Brooks, an actor, singer, director and writer perhaps most widely known for playing the bionic scientist Dr. Rudy Wells in the television series “The Six Million Dollar Man” and its spinoff “The Bionic Woman,” died Dec. 7 in Los Angeles. He was 90.

Brooks’ Broadway career included roles in Arthur Miller’s adaptation of Ibsen’s “Enemy of the People”; John Steinbeck’s “Burning Bright,” for which he received both the Theatre World Award and the Donaldson Award; Arch Oboler’s “Night of the Auk”; and John Van Druten’s “I Am a Camera,” for which he received a Tony nomination.

The actor also co-starred with Brian Donlevy in the national tour of Saul Levitt’s hit play “The Andersonville Trial.” Charles Durning had a featured role in that production, and as they worked together, he and Brooks forged a friendship that lasted until Durning’s death in 2012.

During his Broadway career,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Man From U.N.C.L.E’ could learn a thing or two from ‘Rogue Nation’s’ nostalgic score

Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation

Joe Kraemer

Paramount Pictures

The Man from U.N.C.L.E.

Daniel Pemberton

WaterTower Music

In his score for Kingsman: The Secret Service, Henry Jackman wants you to know he’s a James Bond fan. He just doesn’t want to tell you. Monte Norman’s iconic guitar riff pops in and out of his score, and brassy John Barry flourishes pepper the background music of Matthew Vaughn’s latest pulpy indulgence. Vaughn and comic book brute Mark Millar’s spy thriller struck a chord with audiences in February with gaudy, gory violence and in-jokes to the Ian Fleming novels it draws from. Strangely though, Jackman’s half-baked music never follows suit, tiptoeing around its homages rather than fully committing to its Roger Moore era obsessions.

The music of Kingsman wants its both ways, retro while still feeling fresh enough for modern box office, a shared paradox with The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

U.N.C.L.E.: Will International Moviegoers Save WB's Domestic Box Office Flop?

'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' 2015: Henry Cavill and Armie Hammer. 'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' movie is a domestic box office bomb: Will it be saved by international filmgoers? Directed by Sherlock Holmes' Guy Ritchie and toplining Man of Steel star Henry Cavill and The Lone Ranger costar Armie Hammer, the Warner Bros. release The Man from U.N.C.L.E. has been a domestic box office disaster, performing about 25 percent below – already quite modest – expectations. (See also: “'The Man from U.N.C.L.E.' Movie: Bigger Box Office Flop Than Expected.”) This past weekend, the $80 million-budget The Man from U.N.C.L.E. collected a meager $13.42 million from 3,638 North American theaters, averaging $3,689 per site. After five days out, the big-screen reboot of the popular 1960s television series starring Robert Vaughn and David McCallum has taken in a mere $16.77 million. For comparison's sake:
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

100 Essential Action Scenes: Swordfights

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

Sword fights, like one-on-one fights, target the emotion and power of each individual fighter, but are amplified by the extension of their weapon. Whereas one-on-one fights test the might and bronze of our competitors, sword fights add an extra element of intelligence and skill. A fighter can scrape by through luck in a brawl of fists, but a sword (and knife) fight exposes the true strengths and weaknesses of its opponents.

10. Rob Roy (1995) – No quarter asked, no quarter given

Roger Ebert called the final duel between Rob Roy (Liam Neeson, in a
See full article at SoundOnSight »

The Battle for ‘Lawrence of Arabia’

Part I: The Lawrence Bureau

T.E. Lawrence (1888-1935) ranks among the 20th Century’s oddest heroes. This short, smart, and mischievous British soldier helped organize the Arab Revolt against Turkey, a secondary front of the First World War. He became Emir Feisal’s trusted ally, painfully conscious that the Allies wouldn’t honor promises of independence. After the Paris Peace Conference, Lawrence retreated into the Royal Air Force and Tank Corps as a private soldier, T.E. Shaw.

Lawrence lived a curious double life, befriending both private soldiers and notables like Winston Churchill and George Bernard Shaw. He wrote memoirs and translated Homer while repairing boats and seaplanes. His intellect, warmth, and puckish humor masked internal torment – guilt for failing to secure Arab freedom, regret for two brothers killed in the war, shame over an incident where Turkish soldiers sexually assaulted him.

In his autobiography Seven Pillars of Wisdom, Lawrence
See full article at SoundOnSight »

New on Video: ‘Skidoo’

Skidoo

Written by Doran William Cannon

Directed by Otto Preminger

USA, 1968

Of the nearly 70 films I’ve written about in this column, I would whole-heartedly recommend each without reservation, to not only watch, but to spend good money on. With 1968′s Skidoo, out now on a new Olive Films Blu-ray, I’m breaking that tradition. I wouldn’t suggest anyone purchase this film, though everyone should see it. This is a most unusual, absolutely indefinable, wholly unique motion picture.

I initially viewed Skidoo on the sole basis of its starring Alexandra Hay, who I’ve been smitten with since first seeing her in Jacques Demy’s Model Shop, released the following year. On this point, Skidoo succeeds. Hay is a delightful beauty, charming in a way that is very much of the era. Admittedly unfamiliar with her biography, I can’t imagine why she didn’t have more of a career.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Colossus: The Forbin Project & The Taking Of The Pelham One Two Three Director Joseph Sargent Dead At 89

The director that epitomized the 1970’s, Joseph Sargent, has sadly passed away. (1925-2014)

With a career lasting 50 years, Sargent brought to the big screen such thrilling cinema as The Taking Of The Pelham One Two Three, MacArthur, White Lightning and Colossus: The Forbin Project.

Directors Guild of America President Paris Barclay made the following statement upon learning of the passing of director Joseph Sargent:

“When it comes to directing Movies for Television, Joe’s dominance and craftsmanship was legendary – for the past 50 years. With eight DGA Awards nominations in Movies for Television, more than any other director in this category, Joe embodied directorial excellence on the small screen. He was unafraid of taking risks, believing in his heart that television audiences demanded the highest quality stories – whether chronicling uncomfortable historic events like the infamous Tuskegee syphilis study in Miss Evers’ Boys, or compelling personal stories about inspiring individuals like
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Emmy-Winning Director Joseph Sargent Dies at 89

Emmy-Winning Director Joseph Sargent Dies at 89
Joseph Sargent, director of “The Taking of Pelham One Two Three” and winner of four Emmys and four DGA Awards, died Monday at his home in Malibu of complications from heart disease. He was 89.

Sargent worked until he was 84. His credits included “Something The Lord Made,” “Warm Springs” “MacArthur,” “The Incident,” “Playing For Time,” “Miss Rose White” “Miss Evers’ Boys” and “Love Is Never Silent.”

He and his wife Carolyn helped co-found Deaf Theatre West as also founded the Free Arts Clinic For Abused Children. He won a Genesis Award for “The Last Elephant.”

Sargent worked during his last decade as the senior filmmaker-in-residence for the directing program at the American Film Institute Conservatory in Los Angeles and as the first professor of a masters program in film directing at Pepperdine University in Malibu, where Sargent and his wife Carolyn have resided for 40 years.

“When it comes to directing Movies for Television,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Daily Dead’s 2014 Holiday Gift Guide: Day Eleven

  • DailyDead
Welcome back everyone for the final day of Daily Dead’s 2014 Holiday Gift Guide! Because it’s been an exceptional year for genre fans, we’re focusing today on recapping more books and films that would make for great gifts this holiday season and are perfect for all fans. We’ve also got another great find from over on Etsy and we’re celebrating a new subscription service from the fine folks over at Waxworks Records.

And be sure to check out today’s final Holiday Horrors trivia question below for your shot at winning some awesome merchandise from our fine sponsors at HorrorDecor.net, Scream Factory and Anchor Bay Entertainment.

Thanks so much for following along with our 2014 Holiday Gift Guide and I hope you guys had as much fun reading the series as I had putting it together!

Vendor Spotlight: Waxwork Records

Waxwork Records specializes in releasing horror,
See full article at DailyDead »

Scariest Movies to Watch on Halloween – Redux Edition

It’s that wonderful, frightful, cool and creepy time of year again, when everything including the leaves on the trees are dying and our taste buds are craving sugary sweets and pies made from the guts of our jack-o-lanterns. It’s October, which means Halloween is nearly upon us! Get you costumes completed, your home haunts constructed and your candy collected for trick’r treaters, because you have to make time to watch some of the scariest movies this time of year.

In an effort to assist you in your cinematic scare-fest, we’ve come up with a list of the scariest movies to watch on Halloween… with one caveat. We have excluded virtually all “slasher” flicks. Why? Well, let’s just say we all know them, we all love them on some level, but really… don’t we all want something more in our scary movies? In honor of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »
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