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Are ’70s auteur pictures liberated and loose, or flaky and undisciplined? Bob Rafelson’s Alabama escapade places Jeff Bridges amid a wide range of choice-quality nuts, with both Sally Field and Arnold Schwarzenegger staking their claim on the big screen. What do the changing face of The South and competition-level body building have to do with each other? You tell us!

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Blu-ray

Olive Films

1976 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 102 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Jeff Bridges, Sally Field, Arnold Schwarzenegger, R.G. Armstrong, Robert Englund, Helena Kallianiotes, Roger E. Mosley, Woodrow Parfrey, Scatman Crothers, Kathleen Miller, Fannie Flagg, Joanna Cassidy, Ed Begley Jr., Joe Spinell.

Cinematography: Victor J. Kemper

Film Editor: John F. Link II

Original Music: Byron Berline, Bruce Langhorne

Written by Bob Rafelson, Charles Gaines from his novel

Produced by Bob Rafelson, Harold Schneider

Directed by Bob Rafelson

Some movies are ahead of their time,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Bruce Dern To Appear At "Wild River" 50th Anniversary Screening, L.A., September 17

  • CinemaRetro
By Todd Garbarini

Elia Kazan’s 1960 film Wild River, which stars Montgomery Clift, Lee Remick, Joan Van Fleet, and is Bruce Dern’s debut film, celebrates its 55th anniversary this year. The Royale Laemmle Theater in Los Angeles will be holding a special one-night-only showing of the 110-minute film on Thursday, September 17th, 2015 at 7:30 pm. Actor Bruce Dern is scheduled to appear at the screening and is due to partake in a Q & A and discussion on the making of the film.

From the press release:

Wild River (1960), set in Depression-era America, tells a provocative story of the conflict between an agent from the Tennessee Valley Authority and a proud, defiant older woman who refuses to sell her land in order to make way for a much needed dam. Oscar-nominated actors Montgomery Clift and Lee Remick star, and Oscar-winning actress Jo Van Fleet (only 40 at the time she made the film) plays the stubborn,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Steve Blauner, Who Helped Bring ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Five Easy Pieces’ to Screen, Dies at 81

Steve Blauner, Who Helped Bring ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Five Easy Pieces’ to Screen, Dies at 81
Steve Blauner, who was Bobby Darin’s manager and a partner with Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson in Bbs Productions, which produced classic films including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Last Picture Show,” died June 16 at his home in Marina Del Rey, Calif. He was 81 and was suffering from the complications of a broken hip.

After working for Screen Gems, where he was involved in sitcoms such as “Bewitched,” “I Dream of Jeannie,” “Hazel” and “The Monkees,” Blauner joined “Monkees” producer Schneider and director Rafelson, who had already formed a company called Raybert, in forming Bbs in the mid 1960s. Over a span of several years, the company produced the Academy Award-winning 1974 documentary “Hearts and Minds” and New Hollywood films “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Last Picture Show,” “The King of Marvin Gardens” and “A Safe Place.”

Rafelson said, “Steve was the most beloved of three partners, he
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Steve Blauner, Who Helped Bring ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Five Easy Pieces’ to Screen, Dies at 81

Steve Blauner, Who Helped Bring ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Five Easy Pieces’ to Screen, Dies at 81
Steve Blauner, who was Bobby Darin’s manager and a partner with Bert Schneider and Bob Rafelson in Bbs Productions, which produced classic films including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Last Picture Show,” died June 16 at his home in Marina Del Rey, Calif. He was 81 and was suffering from the complications of a broken hip.

After working for Screen Gems, where he was involved in sitcoms such as “Bewitched,” “I Dream of Jeannie,” “Hazel” and “The Monkees,” Blauner joined “Monkees” producer Schneider and director Rafelson, who had already formed a company called Raybert, in forming Bbs in the mid 1960s. Over a span of several years, the company produced the Academy Award-winning 1974 documentary “Hearts and Minds” and New Hollywood films “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Last Picture Show,” “The King of Marvin Gardens” and “A Safe Place.”

Rafelson said, “Steve was the most beloved of three partners, he
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Jack Nicholson Facts: 25 Things You Didn't Know About the Iconic Actor

Let's hope Jack Nicholson has a pleasant birthday on Wednesday, or at least a less disturbing one than the birthday when pal Hunter S. Thompson showed up outside his house, turned on a spotlight, blasted a recording of a pig being eaten alive by bears, fired several rounds from his 9mm pistol, and (when the terrified actor and his kids refused to open the door) left an elk's heart on the doorstep.

Nicholson turns 78 on April 22, and even though he hasn't been in a movie for five years, he still looms large in our collective imaginations. Younger viewers know him from his flamboyant performances in "The Departed," "The Bucket List," "Something's Gotta Give," and "Anger Management," but his older films remain ubiquitous on TV as well, including "As Good as It Gets," "A Few Good Men," "Batman," "The Witches of Eastwick," "Terms of Endearment," "The Shining," and "Chinatown." A late bloomer,
See full article at Moviefone »

Exclusive Interview with Director Seth Grossman for ‘Inner Demons’

Reality television shows can take a wrong turn into horror especially when a demonic possession is involved.

From former reality TV producer Seth Grossman, “Inner Demons” follows an intervention-style reality show crew trying to film a sixteen-year-old girl fighting a drug addiction. However, she was suffering from something even more destructive—a demonic possession. The movie is an inquiry into the truth about her—with symptoms between the disturbing and scary intersection of insanity, addiction and true possession.

The film stars Lara Vosburgh and Morgan McClellan.

Latino-Review was granted an exclusive interview with Grossman to discuss the production of this horror film. We talked about the young actress, the worlds of addiction and demonic possession and even relating the behaviors of hyenas to demons.

Inner Demons” is playing in select theaters and available on VOD today.

Read the full interview below.

Latino-Review: Tell me on how you were approached for
See full article at LRM Online »

James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82

James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82
James Nelson, a sound editor, supervising sound editor and producer for film and television with more than 180 credits, including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Exorcist” and “American Graffiti,” has died. He was 82.

Director Monte Hellman, on whose classic 1971 film “Two-Lane Blacktop” Nelson worked, said, “He was one of my closest, dearest friends. He’s worked on all my movies. His first work was in sound editing and he did that on all my movies and even on the last one, ‘Road to Nowhere,’ he came in as a consultant just to make sure everything was right because I just wouldn’t do anything without his approval.”

Nelson was the supervising sound editor, often uncredited, on some of the classics of 1960s and ’70s cinema: Richard Rush’s film “Psych-Out” and Rafelson’s classic “Head,” both in 1968; “Easy Rider” in 1969; Rafelson’s “Five Easy Pieces”; Dalton Trumbo’s “Johnny Got His Gun
See full article at Variety - Film News »

James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82

James Nelson Dead: Sound Editor, Producer Dies at 82
James Nelson, a sound editor, supervising sound editor and producer for film and television with more than 180 credits, including “Easy Rider,” “Five Easy Pieces,” “The Exorcist” and “American Graffiti,” has died. He was 82.

Director Monte Hellman, on whose classic 1971 film “Two-Lane Blacktop” Nelson worked, said, “He was one of my closest, dearest friends. He’s worked on all my movies. His first work was in sound editing and he did that on all my movies and even on the last one, ‘Road to Nowhere,’ he came in as a consultant just to make sure everything was right because I just wouldn’t do anything without his approval.”

Nelson was the supervising sound editor, often uncredited, on some of the classics of 1960s and ’70s cinema: Richard Rush’s film “Psych-Out” and Rafelson’s classic “Head,” both in 1968; “Easy Rider” in 1969; Rafelson’s “Five Easy Pieces”; Dalton Trumbo’s “Johnny Got His Gun
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bruce Dern is one of cinema's most underrated actors

Alexander Payne's Nebraska finds the 77-year-old in fine, cranky form as a man who thinks he's won a million

What an unadulterated joy it is to see Bruce Dern leading a movie for a change – and a good movie, at that. Alexander Payne's Nebraska may come to be seen as his swansong, but I hope it leads to a final decade of great performances from one of my all-time favourite actors, now 77 years old.

Dern has played a lot of disagreeable cranks in his time, but Woody Grant, the semi-senile retiree who keeps trying to walk from Montana to Lincoln, Nebraska, to pick up a supposed million-dollar prize, is an almost opaque figure. Dern seems to have subtracted half of his own mind and awareness for the part, and this draws the audience toward him to find out, or guess at, the things his old age incites. Finally,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Bruce Dern: black and white and colour

The veteran actor may not be sure where Bristol is, but he does recall racing a shepherd through the Lake District and being Alfred Hitchcock's 'golden calf'

Bruce Dern was the wayward dreamer of American movies, wild and restless, not built to last. He took a fatal bullet in The King of Marvin Gardens, laid down his life in Silent Running and swam into oblivion at the end of Coming Home. Dern played heroes and villains alike. But he was invariably geared towards the bittersweet send-off or the gaudy comeuppance. To all intents and purposes, he never got out of the 70s alive.

Now, incredibly, the man is back with his best role in decades, possibly his best one ever. The Alexander Payne drama Nebraska casts him as another hopeless dreamer, destined for the rocks, but the performance itself marks a redemption of sorts. At the Cannes film festival,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Nebraska's Bruce Dern to receive career award from Palm Springs Film Festival

'Nebraska's Bruce Dern to receive career award from Palm Springs Film Festival
Bruce Dern, the Oscar-nominated actor who’s generating awards buzz for his starring role in Alexander Payne’s Nebraska, will receive the Career Achievement Award from the Palm Springs International Film Festival on Jan. 4.

Bruce Dern is truly a one of a kind performer,” said Festival chairman Harold Matzner, in a statement. “His skill at capturing the essence of a character, no matter how complex or unorthodox, is unique and unparalleled. In over 80 feature films, this talent is vividly reflected in such classic roles as the deranged pilot plotting a mass attack in Bloody Sunday, or the scarred Vietnam vet
See full article at EW.com - Inside Movies »

Oscar-Bound Bruce Dern Talks Career and Alexander Payne's 'Nebraska'

Oscar-Bound Bruce Dern Talks Career and Alexander Payne's 'Nebraska'
Let the Oscar drum-roll begin for 77-year-old actor Bruce Dern, who gives a wonderfully heartbreaking performance as Woody Grant, an aging man on a quest for a dubious sweepstakes reward of $1 million, in Alexander Payne's "Nebraska." Woody is as stubborn as a mule as he refuses to go gently into that good night. He represents our aging parents' lost dreams as well as an America gone to seed. But there's bedrock too, as Woody takes his wife and kids to visit the old Grant homestead built by his father and brothers.  Will Forte as Woody's passive son and June Squibb (Payne's "About Schmidt") as his impatient wife--whose depths are eventually revealed-- offer superb support, along with Stacey Keach as the villain of the piece. But make no mistake. This is Dern's show. The wily old coot has been in Hollywood long enough (see "Silent Running," "The King of Marvin Gardens,
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

The King of Marvin Gardens – review

After years of minor and starring roles in low-budget independent pictures (mostly exploitation flicks produced by Roger Corman), Jack Nicholson achieved star status playing unaccommodated outsiders in two major countercultural films, Easy Rider (1969) and Five Easy Pieces (1970). Thus began a string of critical and popular successes that included Carnal Knowledge, Chinatown, The Last Detail and One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest. But there was, in 1972, the critical and box-office disaster of The King of Marvin Gardens, now a rarely revived cult classic back in cinemas and on DVD thanks to Park Circus.

One of the most downbeat movies of the time, it features Nicholson as the deeply depressed, anti-charismatic David Staebler, who earns a modest living telling miserable tales about his family in the early hours of the morning on a Philadelphia FM radio station. He's lured at the height of winter to the once grand, now decaying New Jersey
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Hangover Part III, Something In The Air, Epic 3D: this week's new films

The Hangover Part III | Something In The Air | Epic 3D | Benjamin Britten – Peace And Conflict | The Moth Diaries | My Neighbour Totoro/Grave Of The Fireflies | The King Of Marvin Gardens

The Hangover Part III (15)

(Todd Phillips, 2013, Us) Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, Ed Helms, Ken Jeong, John Goodman, Justin Bartha, Melissa McCarthy. 100 mins

Here we go again, ostensibly for the last time, and if this doesn't capture the magic of the first Hangover it's at least less offensive than the second, which isn't much of a recommendation. An intervention over Alan's mental health and the hunt for Mr Chow is what sets in motion the Wtf escapades and male bonding this time, but it all feels a little forced and familiar. If anything, the "wolf pack" is now too tame.

Something In The Air (15)

(Olivier Assayas, 2012, Fra) Clément Métayer, Lola Créton. 122 mins

Assayas gets beyond the cliches of France's young, post-1968 revolutionaries,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Film-makers must trust the audience

Scarecrow and The King of Marvin Gardens – quirky, unstylised films made in the 60s and 70s that refused to smooth their rough edges. This bravery, Adam Mars-Jones argues, is what film-makers are missing today

The label "independent film" doesn't mean what it once did, and the Sundance festival is part of the reason. The moment aspiring film-makers realised there was a potential shortcut to distribution and acclaim, they started smoothing off their rough edges – consciously or without even noticing – or at least they began to stylise themselves. Either way, the overall effect of the festival has not been to promote individuality but to erode it. So it's a mild beneficial shock to watch two American films of the early 1970s on re-release – not because they're masterpieces, exactly, but because they give the flavour of a different set of assumptions.

Scarecrow, directed by Jerry Schatzberg, won a prize at Cannes in
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The King of Marvin Gardens – review

Treat yourself to a re-released gem of the American new wave with an astonishing performance from a young Jack Nicholson

American film-maker Bob Rafelson has just celebrated his 80th birthday, and you couldn't give him or yourself a nicer present than to see this marvellous film, now restored and re-released: The King of Marvin Gardens (1972). Like his Five Easy Pieces (1970), it stars Jack Nicholson giving a performance of melancholy, introspective subtlety that will astonish those who only know about the grinning "old devil" Nicholson, recently to be seen on TV flirting with Jennifer Lawrence. The other glory of this movie is that it shows us what a great actor Bruce Dern is, matching Nicholson in charisma and presence. Nicholson is David, a gloomy talk-show host in Philadelphia, regaling his listeners with long, literary monologues about his life. Jason (Dern) is David's estranged brother, a hustler and shady wheeler-dealer who needs
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The King Of Marvin Gardens shows the last gasp of a crumbling America

Bob Rafelson's Jack Nicholson vehicle set in a decaying Atlantic City is quite the metaphor for early 70s America

In Bob Rafelson's The King Of Marvin Gardens, the Atlantic City of 1972 becomes the anteroom to Paradise for two brothers: one a depressive talk-radio host, the other a manic huckster. Played by Jack Nicholson and Bruce Dern respectively, David and Jason Staebler are the last gasp of an America that is visibly dying all around them.

The Atlantic City of those years, with its ruined pier and empty hotels, was a crumbling pleasure dome; indeed, the movie's main location, the huge Traymore Hotel, was demolished before Marvin Gardens even had its premiere. Fading for decades, AC was doomed to wait another 10 years before legalised gambling made it the opulently tacky Vegas East that it is today. Everything in this film is dilapidated, devalued, degraded or due for demolition. As shot by László Kovács,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

The Great Gatsby, Beware Of Mr Baker, Fast And Furious 6: this week's new films

The Great Gatsby | Beware Of Mr Baker | Fast And Furious 6 | The Stoker | The Liability | Rangeelay

The Great Gatsby (12A)

(Baz Luhrmann, 2013, Us) Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, Carey Mulligan, Joel Edgerton, Elizabeth Debicki. 143 mins

No one's disputing that Luhrmann can put on a show, but can he tell a story? In a way, F Scott Fitzgerald's 1920s parable is a perfect fit: a study of surfaces and seduction and the hollowness of the wealthy. The hedonism and vulgarity are ravishing to behold and the hand-tinted-photo aesthetic is gorgeous. When the fireworks die down, however, that artificiality works against the romantic tragedy, and the characters are too flat to really stir any great emotions. Maybe that's the point.

Beware Of Mr Baker (15)

(Jay Bulger, 2012, Us) 92 mins

When it comes to great rock bio-doc material, Ginger Baker doesn't disappoint on any front: prodigious talent, eventful career (Cream, Blind Faith and Fela Kuti
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Review: 'Simon Killer' Loses That Lovin' Feeling On The Streets Of Paris

Simon (Brady Corbet) is lost. After being dumped by his high school sweetheart after a relationship that ran the length of their college years, the newly graduated, newly single American flees to Paris to get away from it all and find himself. Of course, the problem with undertaking such a journey of self-discovery is assuming that one will like what they find… Unfolding like Roman Polanski’s take on "The King of Marvin Gardens" while simultaneously serving as a suitable spiritual sequel to the director's debut, "Afterschool," in which the male desire to connect meaningfully with others is frayed and warped by life experience, "Simon Killer" is Antonio Campos’ latest chilly, chilling character study, with Corbet effectively replacing Ezra Miller, who led the previous film, as a neuroscience major who studied how the eyes and the brain relate, but has a seriously loose wire between his own brain and his heart.
See full article at The Playlist »

Jack Nicholson Reigns on Sony Movie Channel Oscar Night and Month of February, Retrospective Includes 'Chinatown,' 'Five Easy Pieces' and More

Jack Nicholson Reigns on Sony Movie Channel Oscar Night and Month of February, Retrospective Includes 'Chinatown,' 'Five Easy Pieces' and More
The Sony Movie Channel is celebrating the early films of Jack Nicholson throughout February as part of its Friday Features showcase. Eight films are included in the Nicholson salute, including "Easy Rider," "Five Easy Pieces," "Drive He Said," "The King of Marvin Gardens," "A Safe Place," "Chinatown," "The Last Detail," "The Passenger" and "The Fortune." An entire day of programming will also be dedicated to Nicholson on February 24 (Oscar day) in honor of his record for holding the most nominations ever (12; he has three wins). Each of the films listed above will play, plus "The Two Jakes." A digital photo book is accompanying the films; it includes productions stills and trivia from the films. There's also a "Script to Screen Experience" launching on Facebook February 1. The complete Friday Features schedule for February includes: (All Times are Eastern) ...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »
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