7.4/10
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100 user 86 critic

Fist of Fury (1972)

Jing wu men (original title)
Trailer
4:40 | Trailer
A young man seeks vengence for the death of his teacher.

Director:

Wei Lo

Writer:

Wei Lo (screenplay) (as Lo Wei)
2 wins & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Bruce Lee ... Chen Zhen
Nora Miao ... Yuan Le-erh (as Miao Ker Hsiu)
James Tien ... Fan Chun-hsia
Maria Yi ... Yen
Robert Baker Robert Baker ... Petrov
Fu Ching Chen ... Chao
Shan Chin ... Tung
Ying-Chieh Han ... Feng Kwai-sher
Chikara Hashimoto Chikara Hashimoto ... Hiroshi Suzuki (as Riki Hashimoto)
Jun Katsumura Jun Katsumura ... Suzuki's bodyguard
Chung-Hsin Huang ... Tien
Kun Li ... Hsu (as Quin Lee)
Feng Tien ... Fan
Ying-Chi Li Ying-Chi Li ... Li (as Yin Chi Lee)
Tony Liu ... Chin
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Storyline

Returning to Shanghai to marry his fiancée, Chen Zhen (Bruce Lee) a student of renowned martial arts teacher Huo Yuanjia, discovers his sifu has died. During the funeral, members of a local Japanese dojo show up and insult the Chinese students. The bullying continues, with Chen fighting back, but when he discovers the truth - that his teacher was poisoned on the orders of the dojo's master - he sets off on a doomed mission of revenge. Written by Matti-Man

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Unstoppable! Unbelievable! Unbeatable! See more »


Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sync sound was not widely used in Hong Kong cinema for a long time. The voices were dubbed even on the original Cantonese track. See more »

Goofs

The "Magic Pants" goof. Bruce Lee enters the Japanese Karate school for the first time carrying the framed and glass-covered "Dung Ya Bing Fu" sign. A fight between Bruce and the entire dojo breaks out. As he whirls around fighting his waist sash loosens and his kung fu pants sag deeply, revealing about three inches of white underwear from the back. Then a sudden cut shows Bruce posing motionless having defeated the current round of Japanese attackers. His pants? Tied up around the waist, nice and snug. Now that's some kung fu! See more »

Quotes

[At the Shanghai Park gate]
Sepoy: Hold it. What do you want?
Chen: I want pass.
Sepoy: Not allowed, I'm afraid.
[Points to a sign that says "No Dogs And Chinese Allowed." A dog walks in]
Chen: And that?
Sepoy: You're the wrong color, so beat it.
[a Japanese official walks by and stops at the gate]
Japanese official: Hey you, come here! You want to get in there? Now, now, tell you what. There's only one thing you have to do. Pretend you're a dog and I'll take you in.
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Alternate Versions

For its original 1972 UK cinema release the BBFC requested a cut to remove a shot of a flying throat kick, though it appeared intact in all early theatrical prints and was possibly waived before release. In 1978 the film was withdrawn by BBFC director James Ferman (together with Enter the Dragon) and all nunchaku footage removed together with the previously mentioned throat kick, and these cuts, (totalling 2 mins 51 secs) would persist in all of the film's UK video releases. The cuts were fully restored for the 2001 Hong Kong Legends release. See more »

Connections

Referenced in New Fist of Fury (1976) See more »

Soundtracks

Atmospheres
Written by György Ligeti
Performed by Das Orchester des Südwestfunks Baden-Baden
Courtesy of MGM Records
Brief excerpt, played twice, during dramatic death scenes
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User Reviews

 
Politically Conscious Kung Fu
14 December 2004 | by jmvervilleSee all my reviews

What makes this Kung Fu classic stand out a bit more is the entire basis for the film: a group of Japanese in Shanghai (probably during the Japanese occupation of this part of China) are abusing the Chinese locals, and insulting them greatly. Constantly referring to the Chinese (as a whole) as the 'sick men of Asia,' and even thinking them lower than dogs (as is shown in some of the scenes).

The entire basis of this Kung Fu film becomes a real reaction to the pain of discrimination and the hatred of a sense of racism that the Japanese dished out to the Chinese, and is based actually off of a real story that followed similar tones. What makes this film very special is the commitment that Bruce Lee has to defeating the Japanese whose goal is to crush the will of the Chinese -- a very accurate reflection of the sentiment that existed.

Overall, this is a very good film that was well done; it has a lot of the defects that films similar to its' genre have (having the grainy feel of Kung Fu films of its' time) but other than the typical, it really sets a standard for Kung Fu and film in general. One can see it, in many ways, as being a good basis for subsequent action and Kung Fu films. A lot of the things in this film were very original and very interesting -- overall, a must see film for anybody who enjoys Action, Kung Fu, or 'political resistance' so to speak. A film for the downtrodden striking back.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Hong Kong

Language:

Mandarin | Cantonese | English

Release Date:

9 September 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Fist of Fury See more »

Filming Locations:

Hong Kong, China See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$100,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Golden Harvest Company See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (PAL) | (initial release)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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