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Classic '70s Films You Can Instantly Stream on Netflix

Besides giving us billowy sleeves and suede jackets, the '70s ushered in a cultural explosion of ideas as voices in minority communities resisted oppressive traditions. Many of these ideas seeped into the entertainment at the time, especially film, where viewers started to see less censorship around sexuality and language. If you're curious about what cinema was like in this groovy era, you won't have to look very far.

Netflix's collection of '70s movies encapsulates the provocative and independent spirit of the colorful decade, featuring everything from the critically acclaimed crime thriller The Godfather to the quirky pet cemetery documentary Gates of Heaven.
See full article at Popsugar »

Cannes Film Review: John Travolta in ‘Gotti’

Cannes Film Review: John Travolta in ‘Gotti’
Shame on Cannes. In what appears to be a deal with the devil, or one made with a gun to the back of his head, Cannes director Thierry Frémaux inexplicably agreed to give “Gotti” — the myth-building, record-cleansing inside story of notorious Gotham mob boss John Gotti, as seen by his oldest son — a spot at the prestigious film festival … if you can call a single screening in the festival’s smallest official venue, the Salle Buñuel, which seats fewer than 300, a proper world premiere.

It’s certainly a far cry from the treatment John Travolta received 24 years earlier, when “Pulp Fiction” bowed in competition in the massive Lumière theater downstairs, but no doubt the price of convincing the actor to participate in the following day’s events, which included a master class and beachside screening of “Grease.” Though it was projected without the festival’s red-carpet trailer beforehand, Frémaux introduced the film personally,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Jaws Facts You Never Knew

10 Jaws Facts You Never Knew
We're gonna need a bigger budget. Steven Spielberg's Jaws went on to invent the summer blockbuster, alongside Star Wars from his pal George Lucas, which arrived two years later. But Jaws began as a troubled production that went way over budget and made Spielberg fear for his job. Here we'll take a look at 10 things you never knew about Jaws.

A shark by any other name.

Perhaps some of the best-known behind-the-scenes trivia from Jaws is the nickname the cast and crew gave to the 25-foot great white shark at the movie's center, which was played by three full-scale mechanical models. Bruce. Yes, Bruce. The nickname was a good-natured tribute to Spielberg's lawyer, Bruce Ramer, who has represented the filmmaker for decades. Clint Eastwood and Robert Zemeckis are also longtime clients. After numerous malfunctions resulted in repeated production delays, Spielberg devised another nickname for the shark, too: the Great White Turd.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Annie Hall,’ ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Reds’
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

See AFI Life Achievement Recipients Photo Gallery

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated
See full article at Gold Derby »

Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Diane Keaton movies: 15 greatest films ranked from worst to best
Diane Keaton is one of those special actors who can shift from comedy to drama without missing a beat. She has been nominated for two Oscars in comedy (“Something’s Gotta Give” and winning for “Annie Hall”) and two in drama (“Reds” and “Marvin’s Room”). Keaton is now back in theaters joining Oscar winners Jane Fonda and Mary Steenburgen, as well as five-time Emmy Award winner Candice Bergen in Bill Holderman‘s comedy “Book Club.”

Keaton is also a key cast member in one of the seminal film series of all time — Francis Ford Coppola‘s “The Godfather” trilogy. Her heartbreaking turn as Kay Adams Corleone, a woman who sincerely believed that her husband was a good man, will forever be a part of motion picture history.

A recipient of the 2017 American Film Institute life achievement award, Keaton has also been nominated for eight Golden Globes for her work in film,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Classic '70s Films You Can Instantly Stream on Netflix

Besides giving us billowy sleeves and suede jackets, the '70s ushered in a cultural explosion of ideas as voices in minority communities resisted oppressive traditions. Many of these ideas seeped into the entertainment at the time, especially film, where viewers started to see less censorship around sexuality and language. If you're curious about what cinema was like in this groovy era, you won't have to look very far.

Netflix's collection of '70s movies encapsulates the provocative and independent spirit of the colorful decade, featuring everything from the critically acclaimed crime thriller The Godfather to the quirky pet cemetery documentary Gates of Heaven.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

With ‘Deadpool 2’ Opening, Marvel Will Approach $1.5 Billion and Continue Grinding 2018 Box Office Into Dust

With ‘Deadpool 2’ Opening, Marvel Will Approach $1.5 Billion and Continue Grinding 2018 Box Office Into Dust
With “Deadpool 2” about to debut as the third Marvel film in just over four months, we’re about to learn if it’s too much of a good thing — or, if Mae West was talking about Marvel when she said, “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful.”

Deadpool” was a February 2016 groundbreaker that led the way to “Black Panther” opening in February 2018. The budget was just $58 million and it was R rated, but the opening weekend was $140 million and it proved to be Fox’s biggest-ever domestic release of a Marvel movie.

So what about this time around? “Deadpool 2” estimates for this weekend are about $150 million. Marvel coordinates release dates among distributors, so it’s curious that this one landed closest to the summer. When Fox released the first “Deadpool,” it had been nine months between Marvel movies; this time, it’s three weeks. “Deadpool 2
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The World Is Yours’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The World Is Yours’
American audiences take the Tarantino-ization of genre cinema for granted, but not so the French, who adore the director (who won the Palme d’Or for “Pulp Fiction”) but never went so far as to imitate him outright, until now. Director Romain Gavras’ “The World Is Yours” is the long overdue yet entirely unnecessary gangster movie that French audiences have been missing all this time — a fresh riff on “Les Tontons flingueurs” by way of “Jackie Brown” — and judging by the uproarious reception the film received at its Director’s Fortnight premiere in Cannes, they’re grateful to have a cocky, talky, high-attitude crime saga for themselves.

Following Gavras’ gonzo redheads-will-inherit-the-earth debut, “Our Day Will Come,” this film is a massive change of tone for the director, son of politically conscious “Z” auteur Costa-Gavras and a visionary music-video helmer in his own right. Whereas the younger Gavras’ first feature demonstrated
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Black Panther’ at Cannes: Ryan Coogler Would Make an All-Women Wakanda Movie, and More

‘Black Panther’ at Cannes: Ryan Coogler Would Make an All-Women Wakanda Movie, and More
Filmmaker Raoul Peck and Abel Makonnen Tesfaye (aka The Weeknd) were among a May 11 packed house at Cannes’ Bunuel Theatre, where critic Elvis Mitchell spent 90 minutes digging into 31-year-old Ryan Coogler’s extraordinary trilogy of missing-father-and-son films: “Fruitvale Station,” which played Un Certain Regard after debuting at Sundance, “Rocky” sequel “Creed,” and historic blockbuster “Black Panther,” which Cannes played on the beach the night before .

Coogler’s original coming-of-age concept for “Black Panther” was “a lion learning what it means to be king … it was really about a man who had an idealized version of his father and country in his head. Having that broken, he had to pick up the pieces and create something new.” Coogler had never seen an African man like T’Challa, untouched by colonization, either in a movie or in history.

Theres’ no question “Black Panther” changed the rules of what works in Hollywood. Will it effect permanent change?
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Black Panther’ at Cannes: Ryan Coogler Would Make an All-Women Wakanda Movie, and More

‘Black Panther’ at Cannes: Ryan Coogler Would Make an All-Women Wakanda Movie, and More
Filmmaker Raoul Peck and Abel Makonnen Tesfaye (aka The Weeknd) were among a May 11 packed house at Cannes’ Bunuel Theatre, where critic Elvis Mitchell spent 90 minutes digging into 31-year-old Ryan Coogler’s extraordinary trilogy of missing-father-and-son films: “Fruitvale Station,” which played Un Certain Regard after debuting at Sundance, “Rocky” sequel “Creed,” and historic blockbuster “Black Panther,” which Cannes played on the beach the night before .

Coogler’s original coming-of-age concept for “Black Panther” was “a lion learning what it means to be king … it was really about a man who had an idealized version of his father and country in his head. Having that broken, he had to pick up the pieces and create something new.” Coogler had never seen an African man like T’Challa, untouched by colonization, either in a movie or in history.

Theres’ no question “Black Panther” changed the rules of what works in Hollywood. Will it effect permanent change?
See full article at Indiewire »

Ryan Coogler Would Make a Female ‘Black Panther’ Spinoff

Ryan Coogler Would Make a Female ‘Black Panther’ Spinoff
Ryan Coogler shattered a lot of records by directing “Black Panther,” the first comic-book movie led by a primarily black cast. But during a nearly two-hour talk at the Cannes Film Festival on Thursday afternoon, Coogler also revealed why it was important to break other studio-tentpole conventions.

When asked by moderator and critic Elvis Mitchell if the women of “Black Panther” were as important as the men, Coogler didn’t flinch. “I think you could argue they are more important,” he said.

Coogler went on to describe a stretch of the movie that is close to his heart (warning: minor spoilers ahead). “There’s a whole section of the film where T’Challa is out of the movie and you’re just following the women,” Coogler said about a scene where the titular hero (played by Chadwick Boseman) is left for dead and needs to be rescued. “That’s one
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Birds of Passage' ('Pajaros de verano'): Film Review | Cannes 2018

A rare bird indeed, Cristina Gallego and Ciro Guerra’s Colombian crime epic is like an indigenous The Godfather, revealing the slow and steady destruction of a close-knit native family who gets caught up in the international drug trade in the 1970s. Both ethnographic chronicle and art-house thriller, this superbly crafted, unhurriedly paced feature from the team behind Embrace of the Serpent should see its profile boosted by a premiere in Cannes, where it opened the Directors’ Fortnight sidebar.

The title Birds of Passage (Pajaros de verano) has a two-fold meaning here. It evokes the various species of fowl that form...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Birds of Passage’ Review: A Violent Crime Saga in the Desert from the Director of ‘Embrace of the Serpent’ — Cannes 2018

‘Birds of Passage’ Review: A Violent Crime Saga in the Desert from the Director of ‘Embrace of the Serpent’ — Cannes 2018
Birds of Passage” starts in 1968 and encompasses a dozen years of violent upheaval in the northern Colombian desert, chronicling the rise and fall of a drug dealer and his family; the desert, however, turns out just fine. “Embrace of the Serpent” director Ciro Guerra’s latest surreal drama, co-directed by “Serpent” producer Cristina Gallego, once against pits the dying rituals of a remote tribe against the striking ambivalence of nature — this time, using the backdrop to explore the origins of the drug trade. While it never reaches the psychedelic heights of Guerra’s previous effort and relies on a more conventional pattern of events, “Birds of Passage” delivers another fascinating tone poem about Colombia’s fractured identity.

The narrative is structure around five chapters, labeled as “Songs,” much like the discordant melodies heard throughout: Wild Grass, The Graves, Prosperity, The War, and Limbo. Each installment takes place within the confines of the Wayyu people,
See full article at Indiewire »

Catherine Zeta-Jones Says ‘Cocaine Godmother’ Role ‘Gave Me My Mojo Back’

Catherine Zeta-Jones Says ‘Cocaine Godmother’ Role ‘Gave Me My Mojo Back’
Despite acclaimed performances in films such as movie musical “Chicago” and thriller “Traffic,” Catherine Zeta-Jones said before she landed the lead role in Lifetime’s “Cocaine Godmother: The Griselda Blanco Story,” she started to lose her “fearlessness” that made her want to become an actor.

Following a screening of the biographical film at a Fyc event, Zeta-Jones discussed with Variety’s Debra Birnbaum what made Blanco a compelling character to portray.

In the movie, Zeta-Jones plays the Colombian drug lord from her start in the crime world until her death. During the panel, the actress told Birnbaum that the character “gave me my mojo back.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Francis Ford Coppola Screened an Early Cut of 'Black Panther'

Francis Ford Coppola Screened an Early Cut of 'Black Panther'
[This story contains spoilers for Black Panther]

Francis Ford Coppola was so struck by one scene in particular when he screened an early cut of Black Panther, he asked to see it again as soon as the movie concluded. 

On the commentary track for the Marvel blockbuster, director Ryan Coogler reveals that he showed an early cut of the film to The Godfather director because "his work inspired a lot of the story," Coolger said. 

"As soon as the movie was off, he said, 'Rewind it to the most important scene in the movie. The scene where everything changed'," Coolger said.

...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Oscars Voting Group Kicks Out Bill Cosby and Roman Polanski for Sexual Abuse Convictions

Oscars Voting Group Kicks Out Bill Cosby and Roman Polanski for Sexual Abuse Convictions
Bill Cosby and director Roman Polanski have been ousted from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

“The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Board of Governors met on Tuesday night (May 1) and has voted to expel actor Bill Cosby and director Roman Polanski from its membership in accordance with the organization’s Standards of Conduct,” the Academy announced in a statement. “The Board continues to encourage ethical standards that require members to uphold the Academy’s values of respect for human dignity.”

Cosby, 80, was found guilty last week of drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand in 2004. The
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Roseanne Recap: Mom's the Word

Roseanne Recap: Mom's the Word
Looking for our previous Roseanne recap? Click here.

This week on Roseanne, Beverly makes Jackie’s life a living hell, while two of Rosie’s oldest friends return.

The episode begins in the Conner kitchen with Roseanne talking to Jackie about Bev’s sleepwalking. Bev enters soon after, and complains about sleeping on a lumpy bed upstairs. Dan suggests she go live with Jackie, but Jackie refuses because, well, she “hates her.” Roseanne argues that she has no space, what with Darlene and the kids already living under her roof. The two eventually agree to share “joint custody” of Bev.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Canon Of Film: ‘The Godfather’

In this edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look back at Francis Ford Coppola‘s masterpiece, ‘The Godfather‘. For the story behind the genesis of the Canon, you can click here.

The Godfather (1972)

Director: Francis Ford Coppola

Screenplay: Mario Puzo & Francis Ford Coppola based on the novel by Mario Puzo

I’ve noticed how, The Godfather doesn’t get the same appreciation outside of the U.S. as it does here, lately. People even start discussing the entire trilogy as one film sometimes to justify their ranking of it so high, an act which would’ve been unheard by most, as we typically never considered The Godfather Part III legitimate, despite it showing amazing moments of greatness. And you know, as an American, an Italian-American at that, it be can hard to defend The Godfather at times to people who confront it. Some say Apocalypse Now was better,
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

Highway Dragnet (1954) – The Blu Review

Review by Roger Carpenter

Jim Henry (Richard Conte) is a decorated soldier who has just returned from the Korean War. Making his way across the country to California, he’s stopped over in Vegas to visit an Army friend. While killing time until his dinner date he cozies up to a pretty blonde in a bar before the two argue very publicly. The next day finds Jim hitchhiking out of Vegas when he is arrested by the police—for the murder of the girl he fought with the night before. Jim claims he can prove his innocence but his Army pal, on a classified mission, has disappeared, along with Jim’s alibi. Feeling railroaded, Jim manages to escape the clutches of Detective White Eagle (Reed Hadley) to go on the run.

While on the road he meets two ladies, a high-class photographer, Mrs. Cummings (Joan Bennett), and her assistant, the
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Steven Spielberg Reveals That E.T. Started as a Story About His Parents' Divorce

Steven Spielberg Reveals That E.T. Started as a Story About His Parents' Divorce
James Cameron is taking viewers behind some of the world’s most famous science fiction stories.

The Avatar director’s upcoming six-part television series, AMC Visionaries: James Cameron’s Story of Science Fiction, will explore the genre’s roots through interviews with A-list actors and storytellers who have defined the field. In a clip shared exclusively with People, Cameron sits down with director Steven Spielberg to talk the origins of his hit film, 1982’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.

Close Encounters [of the Third Kind] led to E.T., which I think of as Close Encounters 2,” Cameron, 63, says in the clip before Spielberg, 71, interjects, “I think of it the same way.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
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