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David Hockney Film ‘A Bigger Splash’ Finds Redemption, 45 Years After Being Booed

David Hockney Film ‘A Bigger Splash’ Finds Redemption, 45 Years After Being Booed
Nowadays, one can’t open a film festival line-up without seeing the words “documentary/narrative hybrid.” Though the documentary community is touchy about the nomenclature — (is it docu-ficton? docu-drama? Aren’t all documentaries narrative in some way?) — there’s no disputing that films that challenge the conventions of traditional documentary storytelling are lately in vogue. Robert Greene has built a career on provocative genre agnostic films such as “Bisbee ’17” and “Kate Plays Christine;” Errol Morris’ “Wormwood” pushed the form to new artistic heights; even Martin Scorsese recently toyed with audiences with the tongue-in-cheek Bob Dylan tribute “Rolling Thunder Revue.”

Blending fact and fiction is old hat for Jack Hazan, the filmmaker behind “A Bigger Splash,” a beguiling meditation on love and art forged from the real life of English painter David Hockney. Borrowing its title from one of Hockney’s most famous paintings, the film follows Hockney as he struggles
See full article at Indiewire »

‘The Return of Martin Guerre’ Trailer: French Identity Drama Gets New 4K Restoration

When it comes to stories about medieval identity theft in France, the tale of Martin Guerre’s life has to be the king. Based on true events, the story has been told in books, plays, opera, and two films. So it clearly resonates, and is not going away anytime soon, but the best telling is still undoubtedly Daniel Vigne’s 1982 film “The Return of Martin Guerre.”

The movie tells the story of a soldier who returns to his small town after a brutal war and displays more wisdom and compassion than he had ever exhibited in the past. While he can recall intimate details from his life, his small town has a hard time believing he is the same Martin Guerre they once knew. His wife and family begin to suspect that he is an imposter, and he is taken to court for theft of identity.

It also comes with a bit of film trivia,
See full article at Indiewire »

Surviving Desire: The Films of Jean-Claude Carrière

Luis Buñuel (left) and Jean-Claude Carrière (right).“The screenplay is not the last stage of a literary journey. It is the first stage of a film.” —Jean-Claude Carrière, The Secret Language of FilmThe screenwriting career of Jean-Claude Carrière begins with a gag. Or, it at least seems like a gag that one of the most prolific and distinguished of French screenwriters should have gotten his start by doing the very opposite of what he became known for—that is, by writing novelizations of two films. Having just published his first novel Lizard in 1957, the 25-year-old Carrière was approached by his publisher Robert Laffont to enter a curious writing contest. The prize? A commission to turn Jacques Tati’s Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday (1953) and Mon Oncle (1958)—the latter still in production at the time—into written works. Recalling the incident later on, Carrière writes: “I agreed, and won—thus deciding, although
See full article at MUBI »

1972: Oversharing with "The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie"

Tfe will be periodically looking back at the 1972 film year before we hit the Supporting Actress Smackdown next Sunday. Here's Paolo.

This is going to sound like I’m overestimating my writing power but here goes. The symbolism within Luis Buñuel’s The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, Oscar's Best Foreign Film winner of 1972, is easy to write about. Up to interpretation, as they say. What isn’t easy is writing about the feelings the movie evokes. In short, I might be explaining jokes, which slightly offends me as a fan of comedy. But I’m going to do it anyway, since the humor is the first thing that comes to mind in writing about what is arguably Buñuel’s most personal movie.

The film is about six white bourgeois people who just want to eat but someone or something keeps interrupting them. (I have the same dream... but it's not about food.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Cinema St. Louis’ Classic French Film Festival Kicks off This Weekend with The 317th Platoon at Washington University

Cinema St. Louis presents the 11th Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival which takes place March 8-10, 15-17, and 22-24, 2019. The location this year is Washington University’s Brown Hall Auditorium, Forsyth & Skinker boulevards.

The 11th Annual Robert Classic French Film Festival — presented by TV5MONDE and produced by Cinema St. Louis — celebrates St. Louis’ Gallic heritage and France’s cinematic legacy. The featured films span the decades from the 1930s through the 1990s, offering a revealing overview of French cinema. The fest annually includes significant restorations, and this year features seven such works: Pierre Schoendoerffer “The 317th Platoon,” Marcel Pagnol’s “The Baker’s Wife,” Olivier Assayas’ “Cold Water,” Jacques Becker’s “The Hole,” Jacques Rivette’s “The Nun,” Agnés Varda’s “One Sings, the Other Doesn’t,” and Diane Kurys’ “Peppermint Soda.” The schedule is rounded out by Robert Bresson’s final film, “L’argent,” and two 1969 films celebrating
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

The Film That Won Peter Capaldi an Oscar

Tom Bond Feb 24, 2019

Our short film fanclub takes a look at Franz Kafka's It's A Wonderful Life - the project that made Peter Capaldi an Oscar-winner...

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

With the 2019 Oscars upon us this weekend, it seems the perfect time to revisit an early Peter Capaldi project, and remember that not only is he a former Doctor and one of our finest actors, he’s also an Oscar-winning director. In 1995, long before the Tardis, long before Malcolm Tucker, and long before most people had any idea who he was, Peter Capaldi directed the acclaimed short film Franz Kafka’s It’s A Wonderful Life.

The 23-minute short stars Richard E. Grant (who later appeared in Doctor Who alongside Capaldi’s predecessor Matt Smith) as the author Franz Kafka as he tries to write one of his most famous stories, The Metamorphosis. The novella
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Delphine and Carole' ('Delphine et Carole, insoumuses'): Film Review | Berlin 2019

'Delphine and Carole' ('Delphine et Carole, insoumuses'): Film Review | Berlin 2019
Known outside France for her roles in film classics like Last Year at Marienbad, Stolen Kisses and The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie, the late actress Delphine Seyrig was, along with Catherine Deneuve, Jeanne Moreau and Anna Karina, one of the great female talents to emerge at the birth of the Nouvelle Vague.

But perhaps unbeknownst to most foreigners was Seyrig’s involvement, beginning in the late 60s, with the French feminist movement, for which she became one of its leading celebrity mouthpieces during the latter part of her career. That part of the actress’s life is revealed with considerable ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Willem Dafoe Talks About a Career-Best Performance As Vincent Van Gogh

  • Indiewire
‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Willem Dafoe Talks About a Career-Best Performance As Vincent Van Gogh
Vincent Van Gogh died at 37; Willem Dafoe is 61. Despite that age gap, Dafoe portrays the seminal artist with a physical and spiritual power not unlike his transcendent portrayal of Jesus in “The Last Temptation of Christ.” It marks a career best, and could land him his second acting Oscar nomination in a row, after last year’s “The Florida Project.” (He was also nominated for supporting roles in “Platoon” and “Shadow of the Vampire.”)

“At Eternity’s Gate” director Julian Schnabel, who has been Dafoe’s friend for 30 years, dismissed the idea that the actor was too old for the role: He said Dafoe was in better shape now than Van Gogh was at his death.

“What he did is something I could not imagine,” Schnabel said at an intimate CBS Films awards brunch November 4, with a Q&A moderated by Guillermo Del Toro. “I didn’t want to make
See full article at Indiewire »

Film Review: “Searching For Ingmar Bergman” (2018; Directed by Margarethe von Trotta) (Oscilloscope/Cinema Management Group)

  • CinemaRetro
“A Cruel Mistress”

By Raymond Benson

Master filmmaker and stage director Ingmar Bergman famously said that he was “married to the theatre,” but that “film was his mistress.” In a vintage interview in Margarethe von Trotta’s new documentary on Bergman, the Swedish artist is asked to define “film director.” Bergman’s brow wrinkles and he is lost in thought for a moment… and then he replies that being a film director is “someone who has so many problems to deal with he doesn’t have time to think.”

Film, then, is a cruel mistress, indeed.

An official selection of the New York Film Festival and released to U.S. theaters in November in time to help celebrate Bergman’s centenary, Searching for Ingmar Bergman is a welcome and lovingly-made examination of the filmmaker’s life and work. Director von Trotta, one of the major figures of the New German
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Remembering David Ogden Stiers, Stephen Hawking and More Reel-Important People We Lost in March

  • Movies.com
Reel-Important People is a monthly column that highlights those individuals in or related to the movies that have left us in recent weeks. Below you'll find names big and small and from all areas of the industry, though each was significant to the movies in his or her own way. Anna-Lisa (1933-2018) - Norwegian Actress. She was best known for TV's Black Saddle but she also appears in the sci-fi comedy films 12 to the Moon and Have Rocket -- Will Travel. She died on March 21. (Dagbladet) Stéphane Audran (1932-2018) - French Actress. She won the BAFTA Award for Best Actress for her performance in Luis Bunuel's The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie and received nominations for her work as the title character...
See full article at Movies.com »

'Babette's Feast' star Stéphane Audran dies aged 85

'Babette's Feast' star Stéphane Audran dies aged 85
She was well-known for her long creative partnership with husband Claude Chabrol.

French actress Stéphane Audran, who starred in The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie and Babette’s Feast, has died aged 85.

Their son, actor Thomas Chabrol, told Afp: “She had been ill for some time. She had been in hospital for 10 days and she had returned home. She died peacefully at around 2 am [on Tuesday 27 March]”.

The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie and Babette’s Feast both won best foreign film at the Oscars. She won best actress at the Baftas for the former and was nominated again for the latter.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Stéphane Audran Dies: ‘Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie’, ‘Babette’s Feast’ Star Was 85

Stéphane Audran Dies: ‘Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie’, ‘Babette’s Feast’ Star Was 85
French actress and BAFTA winner Stéphane Audran, who starred in films by Claude Chabrol, Eric Rohmer, Bertrand Tavernier and Luis Bunuel, has died. Her son, the actor Thomas Chabrol, told Afp she passed away overnight following an illness. She was 85. Audran, whose real name was Colette Dacheville, is known for her long collaboration with Claude Chabrol to whom she was married from 1964-1980. She also starred in Bunuel’s 1972 comedy The Discreet Charm Of The Bourgeoisie
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Expecting the Unexpected: Four by Luis Buñuel

  • MUBI
Four late films by Luis Buñuel are showing from February 22 - March 28, 2018 in the United States in the retrospective Buñuel.“Chance governs all things.”—Luis Buñuel, My Last SighStriving for the surprising has always been a prevailing part of Luis Buñuel’s aesthetic practice. At first, this endeavor manifest itself in overtly incongruous visual terms, with the succession of shocking and often inexplicable images that dominate his earliest efforts, namely Un chien andalou (1929) and L'âge d'or (1930). After these two surrealist masterworks, though, both of which Buñuel made in collaboration with the movement’s eminent enforcer, Salvador Dalí, the director’s output went in a decidedly more systematic direction. The films Buñuel made in Mexico, twenty of them from the late 1940s into the early 1960s, could at times be just as provocative as anything else filling his filmography, but their formal and tonal constitution was comparatively tame and, dare one say it regarding Buñuel,
See full article at MUBI »

Canon Of Film: ‘Playtime’

In the second edition of Canon Of Film, we take a look a Jacques Tati‘s ‘Playtime’. For the genesis of Canon Of Film, you can click here.

Playtime” (1967)

Director: Jacques Tati

Screenplay: Jacques Lagrange and Jacques Tati; with addition English dialogue by Art Buchwald

Jacques Tati’s ‘Playtime‘ is clearly a masterpiece, but I think almost nobody can actually master it. According to film scholar Noel Berch, ‘Playtime‘, doesn’t have to just be seen multiple times, but has to be seen from several different points in the theater itself. The movie is all action. Not the way we normally think of action, but “action” in terms of filling up the screen. To watch one thing – usually in the foreground – means you’re missing many things happening in the background, and vice-versa.

The most expensive French film made at the time, the film’s box office failure would eventually bankrupt Tati.
See full article at Age of the Nerd »

The 100 Greatest Comedies of All-Time, According to BBC’s Critics Poll

After polling critics from around the world for the greatest American films of all-time, BBC has now forged ahead in the attempt to get a consensus on the best comedies of all-time. After polling 253 film critics, including 118 women and 135 men, from 52 countries and six continents a simple, the list of the 100 greatest is now here.

Featuring canonical classics such as Some Like It Hot, Dr. Strangelove, Annie Hall, Duck Soup, Playtime, and more in the top 10, there’s some interesting observations looking at the rest of the list. Toni Erdmann is the most recent inclusion, while the highest Wes Anderson pick is The Royal Tenenbaums. There’s also a healthy dose of Chaplin and Lubitsch with four films each, and the recently departed Jerry Lewis has a pair of inclusions.

Check out the list below (and my ballot) and see more on their official site.

100. (tie) The King of Comedy (Martin Scorsese,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Meaning and Madness: Close-Up on Luis Buñuel's "Viridiana" and "The Exterminating Angel"

Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. Luis Buñuel's Viridiana (1961) is showing June 17 - July 17 and The Exterminating Angel (1962) is showing June 18 - July 18, 2017 in the United Kingdom.ViridianaIt’s impossible to avoid describing the films of Spanish director Luis Buñuel as “surreal,” and yet to do so is woefully insufficient. This is for two reasons. In the first place, Buñuel never made one kind of film. In the second place, even his strangest films deal with social reality.Early in his career Buñuel did associate himself with the Surrealist art movement. Among his first productions were the infamous Un chien Andalou (1929) and L'âge d'or (1930), experimental narratives co-written by Salvador Dali in which bizarre and violent psychosexual incidents connect via absurd dream logic. It’s worth bearing in mind that the Surrealists never meant “surreal” to act as a mere label for the uniquely strange.
See full article at MUBI »

Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look
If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by
See full article at Indiewire »

Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look

Willem Dafoe as Vincent Van Gogh in ‘At Eternity’s Gate’: Julian Schnabel Gives Us An Exclusive First Look
If anyone can show us something we haven’t seen before about Dutch painter Vincent Van Gogh, it’s Oscar-nominated painter-filmmaker Julian Schnabel, who announced at Cannes that he will direct “At Eternity’s Gate” starring Willem Dafoe (who also stars in Director’s Fortnight entry “The Florida Project”) as the world’s most acclaimed Post-Impressionist painter, who died at age 37 before he was recognized for his gifts.

“I’ve been working on it for a couple of years,” said Schnabel on the phone from Montauk. “It has to do with trying to make a work of art. By making a film about him, I might shed a little light on what it is to be doing what he’s doing, who he really was, and what his issues were, what somebody needed to do to do what he did, and what he’s not going to do.”

Produced by
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

An Overview of Spanish Independent Cinema in 3 Films

We are excited to partner this year with L.A. Ola, a showcase of the best contemporary independent cinema from Spain, to show several of their films on Mubi in May and June, 2017. Agata's FriendsFor the third consecutive year, the L..A. Ola showcase strives to bring the best of Spain’s current independent cinema to Los Angeles for a short but concise program. This year, the festival will take place in various L.A venues from May 18 - 21 and will later travel to the East Coast with four of the program’s feature films for a special New York edition, which will show from June 2 - 4 at Anthology Film Archives. Although some of the films showcased are already well into their international festival lifespan, some of the films might have their U.S. premier at L.A. Ola. But for us here in the U.S., L.A. Ola
See full article at MUBI »

7 Filmmakers Deeply Influenced by Luis Buñuel

7 Filmmakers Deeply Influenced by Luis Buñuel
Spanish filmmaker Luis Buñuel died in 1983, but his films continue to inspire many filmmakers today, including Woody Allen and David O. Russell. New York’s Metrograph theater is presenting a series of the surrealist filmmaker’s work from March 30 to April 6 entitled “Buñuel in France” that will feature five of his films. Buñuel directed 35 movies between 1929 and 1977.

Read More: Watch: Was Luis Buñuel a Fetishist? A Video Essay

Here are seven filmmakers who have listed a Buñuel film in their top 10 movies of all time.

Woody Allen

Allen’s favorite Buñuel film is 1972’s “The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie,” the famous comedy about six middle-class people attempting to have a meal together. Allen wore his inspiration on his shirt sleeve in his 2011 fantasty-comedy “Midnight in Paris,” casting the actor Adrien De Van to play Buñuel in a scene also featuring the surrealist painter Salvador Dalí (Adrien Brody) and visual
See full article at Indiewire »
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