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Cabaret (1972)

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A female girlie club entertainer in Weimar Republic era Berlin romances two men while the Nazi Party rises to power around them.

Director:

Bob Fosse

Writers:

Joe Masteroff (based on the musical play "Cabaret" book by), John Van Druten (based on the play by) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
4,725 ( 193)
Won 8 Oscars. Another 27 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Liza Minnelli ... Sally Bowles
Michael York ... Brian Roberts
Helmut Griem ... Maximilian von Heune
Joel Grey ... Master of Ceremonies
Fritz Wepper ... Fritz Wendel
Marisa Berenson ... Natalia Landauer
Elisabeth Neumann-Viertel ... Fraulein Schneider
Helen Vita Helen Vita ... Fraulein Kost
Sigrid von Richthofen Sigrid von Richthofen ... Fraulein Mayr (as Sigrid Von Richthofen)
Gerd Vespermann Gerd Vespermann ... Bobby
Ralf Wolter Ralf Wolter ... Herr Ludwig
Georg Hartmann Georg Hartmann ... Willi
Ricky Renée Ricky Renée ... Elke (as Ricky Renee)
Estrongo Nachama Estrongo Nachama ... Cantor
Kathryn Doby Kathryn Doby ... Kit-Kat Dancer
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Storyline

Cambridge University student Brian Roberts arrives in Berlin in 1931 to complete his German studies. Without much money, he plans on making a living teaching English while living in an inexpensive rooming house, where he befriends another of the tenants, American Sally Bowles. She is outwardly a flamboyant, perpetually happy person who works as a singer at the decadent Kit Kat Klub, a cabaret styled venue. Sally's outward façade is matched by that of the Klub, overseen by the omnipresent Master of Ceremonies. Sally draws Brian into her world, and initially wants him to be one of her many lovers, until she learns that he is a homosexual, albeit a celibate one. Among their other friends are his students, the poor Fritz Wendel, who wants to be a gigolo to live a comfortable life, and the straight-laced and beautiful Natalia Landauer, a Jewish heiress. Fritz initially sees Natalia as his money ticket, but eventually falls for her. However Natalia is suspect of his motives and cannot ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Come to the Cabaret [UK Quad Poster] See more »

Genres:

Drama | Musical

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Hebrew | French

Release Date:

13 February 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Кабаре See more »

Filming Locations:

Biergarten, Bavaria, Germany See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$42,765,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Instead of writing a new ballad for the film, John Kander and Fred Ebb were persuaded by Liza Minnelli (and later, Bob Fosse) to use a song from their trunk - "Maybe This Time", a tune Liza had recorded for her very first album. Fosse wasn't initially a fan of the song, but changed his mind after deciding on how to stage it (in the empty nightclub). Minnelli has said that Fred Ebb jokingly blamed her for the loss of an extra Oscar nomination in the Best Original Song category for her desire to sing a previously-written title. See more »

Goofs

The subtitles are inconsistent with how they show German speech/singing. During the opening, with the Master of Ceremonies (MC) singing in different languages, the subtitles show the German words in German. In at least one other part of the movie (when he's singing/dancing with the ape), some German words are translated into English in the subtitles. In this same ape scene, it may seem to non-German speakers or to viewers with no knowledge of what spoken German actually sounds like, that the MC is inconsistent with his pronunciation of English words that start with 'W'. Sometimes he pronounces them as if they start with a 'W', sometimes with a 'V' (for example, the German "Willkommen" (English "welcome") may appear to an English speaker as if it should be pronounced with a "w" sound, but a native German speaker will, in fact, pronounce it as if it started with an English "v" sound (villkommen). See more »

Quotes

Sally: My God! It's enough to drive a girl into a convent! Do they have Jewish nuns?
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: Berlin 1931 See more »

Connections

Referenced in Just Shoot Me!: Strange Bedfellows (2003) See more »

Soundtracks

So What
(uncredited)
Written by John Kander and Fred Ebb
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Perfect On All Levels
20 November 1999 | by joe7See all my reviews

On a historical level, a personal-story level, and as pure entertainment "Cabaret" works perfectly. The scene is Berlin, Germany, only two years before Hitler would come to total power. It is the Berlin that Christopher Isherwood lived in and wrote about: poverty, drug and alcohol escapism, criminals, sleazebags, fighting in the streets, venereal disease, the prostitution of both sexes, the desperation to escape through the film industry, the temporary escape from the harshness of life in "naughty" nightclubs like The Kit Kat Club, which encapsulates it all. It's a bad scene, and a good example of, perhaps, why so many Germans felt in need of a Hitler. There's not a single verbal reference to Hitler, and yet the presence of the growing Nazi movement all around these decadent misfits is ever present in this film. But you can't blame any of these apolitical people for that. Liza Minelli and Michael York's characters are so needy, so desperate just to find some personal happiness in life. They can't be bothered with what's going on in the bigger picture. Except for the Master Of Ceremonies at the Club: Joel Grey's character is a semi-supernatural all-seeing character, mocking, seeming to somehow know EXACTLY the further destruction Germany's headed for. His scary all-knowing grinning face pops in regularly to remind us. The musical number "Tomorrow Belongs To Me" is so effective an illustration of the appeal this new Nazi hope held for impoverished suffering Germans, and yet we have The Master Of Ceremonies' evil nodding grin to remind us, in retrospect, what it really led to.Just as every musical number (aside from being so beautifully choreographed and presented) reminds us of the desperation in Sally Bowles' life and in most of Germany. "Money Makes The World Go Around" is a perfect musical number, and so illustrative of the horrendous financial state of Germany at the time. Joel Grey's raunchy "Two Ladies" on the Kit Kat stage to the hysterical delight of the decadent crowd reminds us that all sexual propriety has broken down (including in the lives of the main characters, now involved in a threeway with one of the few Germans who still has some wealth intact). Everyone who wants an example of the artistic heights that film can reach should see "Cabaret".


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