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Cabaret (1972)

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A female girlie club entertainer in Weimar Republic era Berlin romances two men while the Nazi Party rises to power around them.

Director:

Bob Fosse

Writers:

Joe Masteroff (based on the musical play "Cabaret" book by), John Van Druten (based on the play by) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
4,186 ( 678)
Won 8 Oscars. Another 27 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Liza Minnelli ... Sally Bowles
Michael York ... Brian Roberts
Helmut Griem ... Maximilian von Heune
Joel Grey ... Master of Ceremonies
Fritz Wepper ... Fritz Wendel
Marisa Berenson ... Natalia Landauer
Elisabeth Neumann-Viertel ... Fraulein Schneider
Helen Vita ... Fraulein Kost
Sigrid von Richthofen Sigrid von Richthofen ... Fraulein Mayr (as Sigrid Von Richthofen)
Gerd Vespermann Gerd Vespermann ... Bobby
Ralf Wolter Ralf Wolter ... Herr Ludwig
Georg Hartmann Georg Hartmann ... Willi
Ricky Renée Ricky Renée ... Elke (as Ricky Renee)
Estrongo Nachama Estrongo Nachama ... Cantor
Kathryn Doby Kathryn Doby ... Kit-Kat Dancer
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Storyline

Cambridge University student Brian Roberts arrives in Berlin in 1931 to complete his German studies. Without much money, he plans on making a living teaching English while living in an inexpensive rooming house, where he befriends another of the tenants, American Sally Bowles. She is outwardly a flamboyant, perpetually happy person who works as a singer at the decadent Kit Kat Klub, a cabaret styled venue. Sally's outward façade is matched by that of the Klub, overseen by the omnipresent Master of Ceremonies. Sally draws Brian into her world, and initially wants him to be one of her many lovers, until she learns that he is a homosexual, albeit a celibate one. Among their other friends are his students, the poor Fritz Wendel, who wants to be a gigolo to live a comfortable life, and the straight-laced and beautiful Natalia Landauer, a Jewish heiress. Fritz initially sees Natalia as his money ticket, but eventually falls for her. However Natalia is suspect of his motives and cannot ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

A divinely decadent experience! [UK Quad Poster] See more »

Genres:

Drama | Musical

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | Hebrew | French

Release Date:

13 February 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Кабаре See more »

Filming Locations:

Biergarten, Bavaria, Germany See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$42,765,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In a 1972 interview with Dick Cavett, Liza Minnelli said that she learned Sally Bowles was a real person, so she put personal ads in newspapers in a futile attempt to meet her. Presumably Minnelli was unaware at the time that Sally Bowles wasn't her real name (the character was based on Jean Ross). See more »

Goofs

When Brian thrusts the plate of cake at Sally, the cake slides off the plate and slips down to her lap. In the next shot the cake is up on her chest. See more »

Quotes

Sally: Of course, I may bring a boyfriend home occasionally, but only occasionally, because I do think that one ought to go to the man's room if one can. I mean, it doesn't look so much as if one expected it, does it?
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: Berlin 1931 See more »

Alternate Versions

In the film's first telecast, on ABC-TV, all reference to Max's bisexuality was edited out, changing the motivation one of the other characters completely. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Beverly Kills (2005) See more »

Soundtracks

Tomorrow Belongs To Me
Written by John Kander and Fred Ebb
Sung onscreen by the Nazi youth with singing voice provided by Mark Lambert
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Cabaret
9 April 2013 | by lasttimeisawSee all my reviews

A timeless classic! The musical numbers alone are superlative, even the 30-years-younger CHICAGO (2002, 8/10) pales in comparison. My very first Bob Fosse's film, certainly the film gained its classic fame as the biggest winner of the Oscar in 1973, with 8 wins (including BEST DIRECTOR, LEADING ACTRESS and SUPPORTING ACTOR) and nearly usurped the BEST PICTURE trophy from THE GODFATHER (1972, 9/10), if it had been so, it would be inflicted with much notorious backfire in the film history, but the film itself is an unerring gem among the undying musical genre, my first viewing is a thoroughly exultant experience, and cut and dried, it's on my guilty-pleasure list.

It is my first Liza Minnelli's film as well, the cabaret's "international sensation" Sally Bowles, an innocuous vamp, Liza grants her role a disarming vitality and quaintly resembles a bobbed Anne Hathaway doppelgänger, not only radiates her grandeur in rendering her doughty-yet-alluring show tunes (she is born to do it), her portrayal of Sally personal life is equally (if not more) affecting, her doe-eyed naivety and unrestrained zest for life, for love, for fame elevate her character as the master of her own fate, her sacrifice may not gain concurrence from motley views of life, but a full obeisance to her independence and pluck is duly earned.

Michael York, behind his gawky effeminacy, plunges himself into a more contentious venture, Brian Roberts, his character's bookish bi-sexual temperament is a provocative taboo on big screen (like since ever) and the implicit ménage à trois temptation (with Sally and the suave Helmut Griem, whose gentrified debonair is utterly irresistible) has been simmering to the perfect temperature, under-girds a manifestation of initiating a sex-liberation wave (germane to the 70s era while against the Nazi-rising milieu in the film).

There is a subplot dealing with a bromide of a down-and-out German guy's infatuation with a rich but prude Jewish girl, there is an ironic twist near the end, however never quite manages to steal the limelight from Sally and Bri, but Marisa Berenson's placid performance is still worthy of backslapping (the dichotomy of women's images is a trifle stale though).

Joel Grey, as the so called "Master of Ceremonies" and won an Oscar (against three fellows from THE GODFATHER), serves only as the performer in the film, no clear attachment with the plot, his musical set pieces are burlesque, risqué but entertaining to the bone, with a strenuous mimicry of German accent, it is a hard-earned honor, although I don't understand how Al Pacino could lose at any rate.

The film drops its curtain right before the prevalence of Nazi's atrocity, the ending with the vague reflections of Third Reich audience occupying the place has sublimated the materialistic razzle-dazzle onto an eerily ominous scope which the film has no interest to tamper but the audiences will intuit what will happen next. A great windup, neat and potent!


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