7.6/10
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143 user 36 critic

1776 (1972)

A musical retelling of the American Revolution's political struggle in the Continental Congress to declare independence.

Director:

Peter H. Hunt

Writers:

Peter Stone (book), Sherman Edwards (based on a conception of) | 1 more credit »
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ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
William Daniels ... John Adams (MA)
Howard Da Silva ... Dr. Benjamin Franklin (PA)
Ken Howard ... Thomas Jefferson (VA)
Donald Madden ... John Dickinson (PA)
John Cullum ... Edward Rutledge (SC)
Roy Poole ... Stephen Hopkins (RI)
David Ford ... Congressional President John Hancock (MA)
Ron Holgate Ron Holgate ... Richard Henry Lee (VA)
Ray Middleton ... Col. Thomas McKean (DE)
William Hansen William Hansen ... Caesar Rodney (DE)
Blythe Danner ... Martha Jefferson
Virginia Vestoff ... Abigail Adams
Emory Bass Emory Bass ... Judge James Wilson (PA)
Ralston Hill Ralston Hill ... Congressional Secretary Charles Thomson
Howard Caine ... Lewis Morris (NY)
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Storyline

The film version of the Broadway musical comedy of the same name. In the days leading up to July 4, 1776, Continental Congressmen John Adams and Benjamin Franklin coerce Thomas Jefferson into writing the Declaration of Independence as a delaying tactic as they try to persuade the American colonies to support a resolution on independence. As George Washington sends depressing messages describing one military disaster after another, the businessmen, landowners and slave holders in Congress all stand in the way of the Declaration, and a single "nay" vote will forever end the question of independence. Large portions of spoken and sung dialog are taken directly from the letters and memoirs of the actual participants. Written by Dave Heston <heston@iName.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Great Holiday Show That Sets The Screen Aglow


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 November 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

1776 - Rebellion und Liebe See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$6,104,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut) | (Laserdisc) | (extended Blu-Ray cut)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The final shot required the camera to pull back to show the entire Congressional chamber. However, there was not enough room on the set for the camera truck to pull back far enough. Since the sound stages being used were slated to be demolished after production ended, and this was the final shot being done, a large hole was made in the wall - with the camera truck protruding outdoors after pulling all the way back. As it turned out, the sound stages were never demolished and the wall was rebuilt. See more »

Goofs

When the Declaration is signed, John Dickinson leaves the Congress without signing the document. Though he was a non-signer, he did not resign. At the time the Declaration of Independence was passed, he was on the committee that drafted the Articles of Confederation (part of Richard Henry Lee's resolution). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
McNair: [Adams stands with the Liberty Bell, lost in thought] Mr. Adams? Mr. Adams? Mr. Adams! Well, there you are. Didn't you hear me calling, Mr. Adams? You could have shouted down something, save me climbing up four flights. A man that likes to talk as much as you do, I think...
[Adams turns and gives McNair a hard stare]
McNair: What do you keep coming up here for, Mr. Adams? Afraid someone's gonna steal our bell?
[he chortles]
McNair: Well, no worry. Been here more than fourteen years and it ain't been ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The theatrical version has no credits at the beginning other than "Columbia Pictures presents" and the film's title. The Director's Cut and the extended laserdisc edition includes a main title sequence at the opening. See more »

Alternate Versions

The 2015 Blu-Ray includes an "Extended Version" which reinserts the extended version of "Piddle, Twiddle" and "Lees" reprise into the film; it runs three minutes longer than the Director's Cut. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Ben Shapiro Show: Making Wakanda Great Again (2018) See more »

Soundtracks

But, Mr. Adams
Music and Lyrics by Sherman Edwards
Performed by William Daniels, Howard Da Silva, Rex Robbins, John Myhers, and Ken Howard
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
"Our Lives, Our Fortunes, And Our Sacred Honor"
4 July 2009 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

Probably even before the musical 1776 finished its run on Broadway of 1217 performances from 1969 to 1972 this film was getting ready for release. The musical won a Tony Award for being the best in that category for Broadway and a pity it wasn't similarly honored by the Academy. All it received was a nomination for cinematography.

None of the score, excellent though it is by Sherman Edwards, was calculated to make the hit parade. The songs don't really stand alone, but they are part and parcel of the telling of the tale of the American Declaration of Independence. But what 1776 does is tell just how difficult it was to achieve a consensus for American independence even after we had been fighting the might of the British armies in the northern colonies for over a year.

Two of the men at the Second Continental Congress John Adams (William Daniels) and Thomas Jefferson (Ken Howard) became American presidents. Others there are more or less widely known, depending how deeply one has read into American history or paid good attention in class during school. I think most people would have more than a nodding acquaintance with Benjamin Franklin (Howard DaSilva). All three of these players came over from the original Broadway cast as did most of the film's players.

All of these people as Franklin said are the cream of their colony's society even if that society was built on human slavery. That the South's peculiar institution as they liked to phrase it came from the mother country is sometimes conveniently forgotten by critics of the USA. But slavery's existence was the biggest stumbling block towards building that consensus as 1776 graphically shows.

The founding fathers as we Americans call these guys are shown to be flesh and blood. Franklin who was the wisest one in the bunch deprecated in the film and in real life the demigod status that would attach to them. One founding father however does get a raw deal from 1776. James Wilson was not in the indecisive ninny who only craved obscurity. Emory Bass who also came over from Broadway played him that way because he was written that way. In fact Wilson who should have had the Scottish burr in his speech that was given to Ray Middleton's Thomas McKean, was a man of great distinction and learning. If he didn't shine at the 2nd Continental Congress, he more than made up for it at the Constitutional Convention. A lot of what is in the Constitution is there because of him. He was also one of the original members of the Supreme Court that George Washington appointed. Not at all like the fellow you see in 1776.

The ladies aren't ignored, Martha Wayles Jefferson appears in the flesh to give Tom Jefferson some relief from some tension he was having and is played by Blythe Danner. Virginia Vestoff plays Abigail Adams who only appears in William Daniel's imagination. It's fascinating to see Adams yearning for the wife, but still tending to business. When he became our second president, Abigail stayed in Braintree, Massachusetts which was their home and John spent as much time as he could with her and not really staying on top of things in Philadelphia and later in the new capital of Washington, DC. That's another subject for another film.

In fact watching these gentlemen reach the consensus for American independence is watching them reach said consensus, but also knowing how they all became some really bitter enemies later on after the nation's freedom was secured. I hope some who read this review and see 1776 will take the time and trouble to see just what happened with the rest of these people.

And if the film stirs your curiosity about how America was founded, than 1776 will be well worth watching.


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