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Swat: Season Two; Shemar Moore TV Show Renewed

The Tiffany Network is doubling down with Hondo and Deacon. CBS has renewed its Swat TV show reboot for a second season. The high-action program is a reboot of the 1975 original, starring Steve Forrest, Robert Urich, Rod Perry, Mark Shera, and James Coleman — itself a spinoff of The Rookies on ABC. A CBS police drama, Swat stars Shemar Moore, Stephanie Sigman, Alex Russell, Jay Harrington, Lina Esco, Kenny Johnson, and Peter Onorati. The police drama centers on Sergeant Daniel “Hondo” Harrelson (Moore). A lifetime Los Angeles local and former Marine, Hondo has been tapped to lead a new “last stop” Special Weapons and Tactics unit. His team includes the seasoned David “Deacon” Kay (Harrington), newcomer Jim Street (Russell), canine trainer Christina “Chris” Alonso (Esco), and expert driver, Dominique Luca (Johnson). They work under the supervision of L.A. Metro
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Swat: Season One Ratings

In 1975, the Swat TV show -- starring Steve Forrest, Robert Urich, Rod Perry, Mark Shera, and James Coleman -- spun off from ABC's TV series, The Rookies. Prior to its cancellation, Swat ran for 37 episodes, over the course of two seasons. Decades later, the concept came back into vogue, and it premiered in 2003 as a feature film with Samuel L. Jackson and Colin Farrell. Now, CBS has rebooted the police drama, but will a new generation be receptive to it? Will Swat be cancelled or renewed for season two? Stay tuned. A high-action program, Swat stars Shemar Moore, Stephanie Sigman, Alex Russell, Jay Harrington, Lina Esco, Kenny Johnson, and Peter Onorati. The CBS TV series centers on Sergeant Daniel “Hondo” Harrelson (Moore). A lifetime Los Angeles local and former Marine, Hondo has been tapped to lead a new “last stop”
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

It Came From The Tube: Satan’S School For Girls (1973)

Warning: if you’re not a Kate Jackson fan, today’s column may not work in your favor. Plus, we probably shouldn’t hang out. I first fell in love with Ms. Jackson (if you’re nasty) when I was six. At the time, she was starring on Charlie’s Angels, along with Farrah Blah-Blah and Jaclyn What’s Her Name, but I think maybe I liked Kate best. Her long black hair, radiant smile, and raspy sing song drawl mesmerized me for the remainder of that show’s run. But for fans of horror, Kate worked with Dan Curtis on Dark Shadows, before landing one of the leads in Satan’s School for Girls (1973), producer Aaron Spelling’s venture into one of the ‘70s greatest capitalist ventures, Satanic Panic. It’s a fun romp; and spoiler alert - Kate is great in it. (She’s just the most, don’t you think?
See full article at DailyDead »

Beth Howland, Vera on Alice, Passes Away at 74

Beth Howland, Vera on Alice, Passes Away at 74
2016 has not been an easy year for the entertainment industry, with icons like David Bowie, Prince, Alan Rickman and many more passing away over the past few months. Today we have word that the film and TV industry has lost another one of its own. Although this death actually happened at the very end of last year. Actress Beth Howland, who starred in the hit 1970s TV series Alice, passed away in Santa Monica, California, on December 31, 2015.

The Associated Press broke the news of the actress' death, which was confirmed by her husband, actor Charles Kimbrough. The late actress' husband revealed that there was no public announcement, funeral or memorial service, because "that was her choice." It isn't known how long the actress was suffering from lung cancer.

Beth Howland was born May 28, 1941 in Boston, and began her acting career at a fairly early age. After graduating from high school
See full article at MovieWeb »

Alice's Vera, Beth Howland, Dead at 74

Alice's Vera, Beth Howland, Dead at 74
Beth Howland, who is fondly remembered as high-strung waitress Vera on the 1970s/80s CBS sitcom Alice, died on Dec. 31 at the age of 74, following a battle with lung cancer. Howland’s husband, Murphy Brown vet Charles Kimbrough, told the New York Times that he refrained from announcing her death earlier, in keeping with her wishes.

Howland won the role of Vera Louise Gorman (which was played by Valerie Cutin in the 1974 Martin Scorsese film Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore) after a Warner Bros. TV exec saw her play anxious bride-to-be Amy in Stephen Sondheim’s Broadway musical Company.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Robert Drasnin, ‘Twilight Zone’ Composer, Dies at 87

Robert Drasnin, ‘Twilight Zone’ Composer, Dies at 87
Robert Drasnin, composer of “The Kremlin Letter” and many classic TV shows including “Twilight Zone,” “The Man From U.N.C.L.E.” and “Mission: Impossible,” died Wednesday, May 13, at Providence Tarzana Medical Center. He was 87. Death was due to complications from a recent fall.

Drasnin, whose credits also include scores for “The Wild Wild West,” “The Alfred Hitchcock Hour,” “Lost in Space,” “Police Story” and “Hawaii Five-0,” served as director of music for CBS Television from 1977 to 1991.

He was born Nov. 17, 1927, in Charleston, W.Va., but lived in Southern California from 1938. He majored in music at UCLA, receiving his B.A. in 1949, and was soon on the road playing saxophone, clarinet and flute for bandleaders Skinnay Ennis and Les Brown.

After Army service during the Korean War, he returned to UCLA as a graduate student and became associate conductor of the UCLA Symphony. During the 1950s he also played with the Tommy Dorsey orchestra
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Bob Palmer, Longtime Publicist, Dies at 85

Bob Palmer — who, through a 60-year career as a publicist, represented clients including Anthony Hopkins and Dick Van Dyke as well as some of the most popular TV shows of the 1960s and 70s — died Monday at his home in Pacific Palisades of natural causes. He was 85.

After working for ABC and several major studios, Palmer started his own firm in 1979, representing Hopkins, Van Dyke, Faye Dunaway, Sada Thompson, David Soul, Peter Strauss, Michele Lee and Larry Schiller Prods., the latter of which produced the TV movie “The Executioner’s Song.” Palmer for a time represented Hopkins as a manager, and created the 1992 Academy Award campaign for Hopkins’ performance in “The Silence of the Lambs,” for which he won the Oscar for best actor.

In an interview, Hopkins said he first met Palmer while doing a publicity junket in 1973 at the Century Plaza Hotel, and afterward they became “very good friends.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Rocky Moriana, Sound & Music Supervisor, Dies at 86

Rocky Moriana, Sound & Music Supervisor, Dies at 86
Rocco (Rocky) A. Moriana, best known for his work as sound supervisor and music supervisor for producers Danny Thomas and Aaron Spelling, died at his home in Calabasas, Calif., on Feb. 5.

Moriana’s 100-plus screen credits starting with TV Series “Hennesey” and ended with “Beverly Hills, 90210.” In between were such notables as “Hazel,” “That Girl,” “My World and Welcome to It” (for which he was honored by the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his contribution), “Barney Miller,” “The Rookies,” “S.W.A.T.,” “The Love Boat,” “Fantasy Island,” “Harper Valley P.T.A.,” “Family,” “Starsky and Hutch,” “Vegas,” ” Charlie’s Angels,” “Hart to Hart,” “Life With Lucy,” “The Love Boat,” “Nightingales,” “Dynasty,” “Melrose Place,” “7th Heaven” and “Savannah.”

Moriana also worked on such telepics and miniseries as “21 Hours at Munich,” “The Boy in the Plastic Bubble,” “The Amazing Howard Hughes,” “James A. Michener’s Texas” (for which he received the Motion Picture
See full article at Variety - TV News »

S.W.A.T. Star Steve Forrest Dies

S.W.A.T. Star Steve Forrest Dies
"Let's roll!" started with S.W.A.T. Steve Forrest, best known for starring in the 1970s action drama, died May 18 at his home in Thousand Oaks, Calif., according to his family. He was 87. A spinoff of the Aaron Spelling-produced The Rookies, S.W.A.T. ran on ABC for two seasons. Forrest had dozens of TV and film credits to his name, but the Texas-born actor was forever linked to the role of Lt. Dan "Hondo" Harrelson, whose signature line, "Let's roll," has been adopted as a catchphrase many times over. Fittingly, his final acting gig was a cameo as a Swat truck driver in the 2003 film S.W.A.T., starring Samuel L. Jackson as Hondo. After serving in the Army during...
See full article at E! Online »

DVD Playhouse--June 2011

DVD Playhouse June 2011

By

Allen Gardner

Kiss Me Deadly (Criterion) Robert Aldrich’s 1955 reinvention of the film noir detective story is one of cinema’s great genre mash-ups: part hardboiled noir; part cold war paranoid thriller; and part science- fiction. Ralph Meeker plays Mickey Spillane’s fascist detective Mike Hammer as a narcissistic simian thug, a sadist who would rather smash a suspect’s fingers than make love to the bevvy of beautiful dames that cross his path. In fact, the only time you see a smile cross Meeker’s sneering mug is when he’s doling out pain, with a vengeance. When a terrified young woman (Cloris Leachman, film debut) literally crossed Hammer’s path one night, and later turns up dead, he vows to get to the bottom of her brutal demise. One of the most influential films ever made, and perhaps the most-cited film by the architects
See full article at The Hollywood Interview »

'Police Squad' Star Leslie Nielsen Dies at 84

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'Police Squad' Star Leslie Nielsen Dies at 84
Filed under: TV News

Sad news: Leslie Nielsen, star of the short-lived but classic TV comedy 'Police Squad!' has died at the age of 84.

Nielsen died of complications from pneumonia at a Fort Lauderdale, Fl hospital.

Nielsen had a lot of other TV roles over the years, a career that started on 'Actor's Studio' in 1950 to the Canadian comedy 'Robson Arms' in 2007. In between he guest starred in shows like 'The Golden Girls' (his character ended up marrying Dorothy), 'Due South,' 'Evening Shade,' 'Who's The Boss?' 'Murder, She Wrote,' 'Highway to Heaven,' 'Hotel,' 'Fantasy Island,' 'Vega$,' 'The Love Boat,' 'Swat,' 'Kojak,' 'Kung Fu,' 'The Rookies,' 'Ironside,' Hawaii Five-0,' 'Night Gallery,' 'M*A*S*H,' 'The Man From U.N.C.L.E.,' 'Gunsmoke,
See full article at Aol TV. »

Charlie’s Angels’ Kate Jackson says she’s broke

By Greg Hernandez

She was supposed to be the smart one on Charlie’s Angels, but now Kate Jackson says she’s broke.

The 61-year-old actress, who also starred in the hit shows The Rookies and Scarecrow and Mrs. King, has filed a lawsuit in Los Angeles Superior Court against her former financial advisor seeking $3 million in damages.

According to TMZ.com: Jackson claims Farrah Fawcett’s former business manager, Richard B. Francis, knew about Kate’s “extremely close relationship” with Farrah and used that information to get Kate as a client.

Kate claims Francis told her she was worth roughly $5.4 million — and she could live off of the interest from her accounts … at least $300,000 per year. But Jackson said she was actually worth considerably less — only about $3 million.

To read more go to GregInHollywood.com.
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

'Harry Potter' repeats at overseas boxoffice

'Harry Potter' repeats at overseas boxoffice
After its record-breaking worldwide opening the previous frame, "Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince" gave up considerable boxoffice altitude on the foreign circuit during the weekend but still remained a dominant No. 1 with $82.5 million lured from 15,850 screens in 64 territories.

Although the weekend take dropped 65% from its smashing $236 million overseas debut, the "Prince" frame catapulted Warner Bros. past the $1 billion international gross mark for 2009, the ninth consecutive year the studio has surpassed that benchmark.

Fox was the first studio this year to top $1 billion internationally, doing so early this month. Paramount passed the benchmark a week and a half ago, and Sony hopes to do so by early next month.

"Prince's" overseas cume is $404 million and its global boxoffice total is $625.2 million, making the sixth outing in the multibillion-dollar Warners franchise the 39th biggest-grossing title in history after just 12 days of release.

The latest "Potter" opened in Poland ($2 million from 196 screens
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

TV biz to pay tribute to Spelling during Emmys

The television industry will pay tribute to the late producer Aaron Spelling on Sunday during the 58th annual Primetime Emmy Awards telecast on NBC, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences officials said Wednesday. Joan Collins, Heather Locklear and Stephen Collins are among the stars of Spelling-produced shows who will take part in the tribute segment to the producer, who died in June at age 83. Spelling's long list of TV hits ranged from ABC's The Mod Squad and The Rookies to WB Network's 7th Heaven and Charmed.

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006
Aaron Spelling, the amazingly prolific television producer whose hits ranged from Charlie's Angels to 7th Heaven, died Friday after suffering a stroke last Sunday; he was 83. Spelling passed away at his Los Angeles home, where he had been resting since his stroke on June 18, for which he was briefly hospitalized. Born in Dallas, Spelling was the fourth son of immigrant Jews and grew up in poverty on the self-proclaimed "wrong side of the tracks," ostracized in his early years because of his religion and orthodox parents. After serving in World War II, he enrolled and later graduated from Southern Methodist University, quickly moving to Hollywood, where he worked briefly as a bit-player actor (he was a gas station attendant in an episode of I Love Lucy) and married the actress Carolyn Jones (later of The Addams Family fame) in 1953; they later divorced in 1964. Spelling found greater success as a writer for such shows as Playhouse 90, and soon was hired as a producer by Dick Powell for Four Star Productions, and his first hit was the crime drama Burke's Law, starring Gene Barry. After Powell passed away, Spelling teamed with actor-producer Danny Thomas, with whom he scored a major hit in The Mod Squad in 1969. At the dawn of the 70s, Spelling signed an exclusive contract with ABC, a network his programming would come to dominate for the next decade; former ABC programming chief Leonard Goldberg joined him as a producing partner in 1972. The two produced innumerable television films (including The Boy in the Bubble, starring heartthrob John Travolta) before striking series gold with action shows SWAT, Starsky & Hutch and The Rookies, as well as the acclaimed Emmy-winning drama Family. It was a trio of huge hits, however, that cemented Spelling's fame and success: the Saturday night revolving guest-cast shows The Love Boat and Fantasy Island, and the phenomenally popular Charlie's Angels, which launched the careers of Farrah Fawcett and Jaclyn Smith (among others) and single-handedly invented "jiggle television," shows featuring beautiful women in revealing clothing. Other shows followed -- Hart to Hart, Hotel, Vega$, and TJ Hooker among them -- before Spelling struck gold again in the 80s with Dynasty, a pop-culture phenomenon that challenged the popular soap Dallas and for one season was the number one show in the country. Oftentimes, his Los Angeles mansion, which he bought in 1983 with second wife Candy Spelling and boasted 123 rooms, a bowling alley, swimming pool, gymnasium, tennis court, screening room and four 2-car garages, was compared to the excesses of Dynasty's fictional denizens. When the quintessential 80s show was cancelled, Spelling found himself for the first time without a series on the air, which he said caused him to fall into a major depression. Nevertheless, after a year Spelling was back, this time with the teen soap Beverly Hills 90210, which helped launch the fledgling Fox network as well as his daughter Tori Spelling's acting career, a circumstance she would later affectionately spoof in her own comedy series, So NoTORIous. Spinoff Melrose Place quickly followed, as well as a number of other California-set series that were less memorable. Still, even into the new century, Spelling found himself with two hits on the WB network: the witchy fantasy Charmed, which ended only last season, and religious family drama 7th Heaven, which after a brief cancellation earlier this year was resurrected by the new CW network for the upcoming fall season. Though derided for his shows' superficiality, Spelling preferred to call his hits "mind candy," and his success and endurability was also marked by acclaimed programming that included the TV films The Best Little Girl in the World and the Emmy-winning AIDS drama And the Band Played On. Spelling also produced a number of feature films, including Soapdish, California Split, and Mr. Mom. Spelling is survived by his wife Candy, daughter Tori, and son Randy Spelling. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006
Aaron Spelling, the amazingly prolific television producer whose hits ranged from Charlie's Angels to 7th Heaven, died Friday after suffering a stroke last Sunday; he was 83. Spelling passed away at his Los Angeles home, where he had been resting since his stroke on June 18, for which he was briefly hospitalized. Born in Dallas, Spelling was the fourth son of immigrant Jews and grew up in poverty on the self-proclaimed "wrong side of the tracks," ostracized in his early years because of his religion and orthodox parents. After serving in World War II, he enrolled and later graduated from Southern Methodist University, quickly moving to Hollywood, where he worked briefly as a bit-player actor (he was a gas station attendant in an episode of I Love Lucy) and married the actress Carolyn Jones (later of The Addams Family fame) in 1953; they later divorced in 1964. Spelling found greater success as a writer for such shows as Playhouse 90, and soon was hired as a producer by Dick Powell for Four Star Productions, and his first hit was the crime drama Burke's Law, starring Gene Barry. After Powell passed away, Spelling teamed with actor-producer Danny Thomas, with whom he scored a major hit in The Mod Squad in 1969. At the dawn of the 70s, Spelling signed an exclusive contract with ABC, a network his programming would come to dominate for the next decade; former ABC programming chief Leonard Goldberg joined him as a producing partner in 1972. The two produced innumerable television films (including The Boy in the Bubble, starring heartthrob John Travolta) before striking series gold with action shows SWAT, Starsky & Hutch and The Rookies, as well as the acclaimed Emmy-winning drama Family. It was a trio of huge hits, however, that cemented Spelling's fame and success: the Saturday night revolving guest-cast shows The Love Boat and Fantasy Island, and the phenomenally popular Charlie's Angels, which launched the careers of Farrah Fawcett and Jaclyn Smith (among others) and single-handedly invented "jiggle television," shows featuring beautiful women in revealing clothing. Other shows followed -- Hart to Hart, Hotel, Vega$, and TJ Hooker among them -- before Spelling struck gold again in the 80s with Dynasty, a pop-culture phenomenon that challenged the popular soap Dallas and for one season was the number one show in the country. Oftentimes, his Los Angeles mansion, which he bought in 1983 with second wife Candy Spelling and boasted 123 rooms, a bowling alley, swimming pool, gymnasium, tennis court, screening room and four 2-car garages, was compared to the excesses of Dynasty's fictional denizens. When the quintessential 80s show was cancelled, Spelling found himself for the first time without a series on the air, which he said caused him to fall into a major depression. Nevertheless, after a year Spelling was back, this time with the teen soap Beverly Hills 90210, which helped launch the fledgling Fox network as well as his daughter Tori Spelling's acting career, a circumstance she would later affectionately spoof in her own comedy series, So NoTORIous. Spinoff Melrose Place quickly followed, as well as a number of other California-set series that were less memorable. Still, even into the new century, Spelling found himself with two hits on the WB network: the witchy fantasy Charmed, which ended only last season, and religious family drama 7th Heaven, which after a brief cancellation earlier this year was resurrected by the new CW network for the upcoming fall season. Though derided for his shows' superficiality, Spelling preferred to call his hits "mind candy," and his success and endurability was also marked by acclaimed programming that included the TV films The Best Little Girl in the World and the Emmy-winning AIDS drama And the Band Played On. Spelling also produced a number of feature films, including Soapdish, California Split, and Mr. Mom. Spelling is survived by his wife Candy, daughter Tori, and son Randy Spelling. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff

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