While matchmaking for friends and neighbours, a young 19th Century Englishwoman nearly misses her own chance at love.
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1  
1972  

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
Doran Godwin ...  Emma Woodhouse 6 episodes, 1972
John Carson ...  Mr. Knightley 6 episodes, 1972
Donald Eccles ...  Mr. Woodhouse 6 episodes, 1972
Constance Chapman ...  Miss Bates 6 episodes, 1972
Ellen Dryden ...  Mrs. Weston 6 episodes, 1972
Debbie Bowen ...  Harriet Smith 6 episodes, 1972
Raymond Adamson ...  Mr. Weston 6 episodes, 1972
Timothy Peters Timothy Peters ...  Mr. Elton 5 episodes, 1972
Vivienne Moore Vivienne Moore ...  Williams 5 episodes, 1972
Robert East ...  Frank Churchill 4 episodes, 1972
Ania Marson ...  Jane Fairfax 4 episodes, 1972
Mary Holder Mary Holder ...  Mrs. Bates 4 episodes, 1972
Fiona Walker ...  Mrs. Elton 3 episodes, 1972
Mollie Sugden ...  Mrs. Goddard 2 episodes, 1972
John Alkin John Alkin ...  Robert Martin 2 episodes, 1972
Amber Thomas Amber Thomas ...  Patty 2 episodes, 1972
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Storyline

This BBC production, set in the small town of Highbury depicts the often hilarious attempts of Miss Emma Woodhouse to make proper marital matches for all of her friends. Though often mistaken in her judgement, she is counseled and criticised by her neighbor and brother-in-law, the wise Mr. Knightley whose attentions to her are motivated by more than brotherly love. Written by Teresa B. O'Donnell <sun.moon.stars@worldnet.att.net>

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Genres:

Comedy | Romance

Certificate:

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Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The white floral-print muslin gown with cut-out sleeves Doran Godwin (Emma Woodhouse) wears at Hartfield, while discussing Jane Fairfax's "reserve" with Mr. Knightley, is the same gown Sabina Franklyn (Jane Bennet) wears at Longbourn in Pride and Prejudice (1980) following the Meryton Assembly ball. See more »

Goofs

The characters are seen playing cards with a modern deck of cards that show both the suit symbol (hearts, clubs, spades, clubs) and a number on each corner. During the time period the movie was set in, playing cards did not show the number of the card in the corners. See more »

Connections

Version of Emma (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

The Twenty-ninth of May
Traditional
From John Playford's 'The English Dancing Master', First Edition (1651)
[theme]
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User Reviews

 
excellent & clever adaptation, and who cares about the settings?
11 January 2008 | by pabzumSee all my reviews

I have just finished watching this adaptation of Emma for the first time and I feel I must openly declare here that it seems to me quite shameful that the Paltrow and the Beckinsale versions should be more often remembered. How that is to be explained I am at a loss to tell. It is true that John Carson may not look to be the epitome of Knightleyness, but he does a most excellent job of acting like Mr Knightley, and that is what one should care about, I say. Indeed, I was gratified by the sheer intelligence and sensitivity of all the actors in it, the director, the screenwriter and even the dress-maker or whatever she is called. The clothes and dresses may not all have been true to the times but most certainly they were thoughtfully true to the characters.

Also, wonder of wonders, there is no musical soundtrack to pester one's feelings telling them what to feel at every turn. What that does is it helps to make dialogues sound truthful, natural and issuing from people who are thoroughly engaged – both as actors and characters – in listening to each other.

Another thing that has contributed to place this in my estimation as the best extant adaptation of Emma is that there is no symbolic meddling with the story (excepting perhaps on the last tableau). One thing I love in Jane Austen – which is of course not what there is to be loved in other authors – is that nothing she writes has any symbols: every little thing is whatever it is, no less, no more. And I unconditionally praise the director John Glenister, the screenwriter Denis Constanduros and the producer Martin Lisemore for having seen that simple fact about Jane Austen and for having brought the book to life so clearly and so lovingly.

So three cheers for them, and five to Doran Godwin.


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

20 July 1972 (UK) See more »

Also Known As:

Emma See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(6 parts)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See full technical specs »

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