A poor but hopeful boy seeks one of the five coveted golden tickets that will send him on a tour of Willy Wonka's mysterious chocolate factory.

Director:

Mel Stuart

Writers:

Roald Dahl (screenplay by), Roald Dahl (book)
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Popularity
723 ( 64)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 2 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Gene Wilder ... Willy Wonka
Jack Albertson ... Grandpa Joe
Peter Ostrum ... Charlie
Roy Kinnear ... Mr. Salt
Julie Dawn Cole ... Veruca Salt
Leonard Stone ... Mr. Beauregarde
Denise Nickerson ... Violet Beauregarde
Nora Denney ... Mrs. Teevee (as Dodo Denney)
Paris Themmen ... Mike Teevee
Ursula Reit ... Mrs. Gloop
Michael Bollner ... Augustus Gloop
Diana Sowle ... Mrs. Bucket
Aubrey Woods Aubrey Woods ... Bill
David Battley ... Mr. Turkentine
Günter Meisner ... Mr. Slugworth (as Gunter Meisner)
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Storyline

The world is astounded when Willy Wonka, for years a recluse in his factory, announces that five lucky people will be given a tour of the factory, shown all the secrets of his amazing candy, and one will win a lifetime supply of Wonka chocolate. Nobody wants the prize more than young Charlie, but as his family is so poor that buying even one bar of chocolate is a treat, buying enough bars to find one of the five golden tickets is unlikely in the extreme. But in movieland, magic can happen. Charlie, along with four somewhat odious other children, get the chance of a lifetime and a tour of the factory. Along the way, mild disasters befall each of the odious children, but can Charlie beat the odds and grab the brass ring? Written by Rick Munoz <rick.munoz@his.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Enter a world of pure imagination. See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

In the office, after Charlie is introduced to Mr. Wilkinson, Wonka puts his hands on Charlie's shoulders. You can hear Wonka say, "You've won," but his lips don't move (at 01:35:20, but it's Wonka's chin that doesn't move since the camera cut to a shot of Charlie from behind Wonka at 01:35:18 while Wonka was saying "I had to test you Charlie" and we saw Wonka's chin moving then, just before he says "You won!" without his chin moving). See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Bill: All right, all right, all right, what's it going to be? A Triple Cream Cup for Christopher. A Sizzler for June Marie. And listen!
[the children fall silent]
Bill: Wonka's got a new one today.
Children: What is it?
Bill: This is called a Scrumpdiddlyumptious Bar.
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Crazy Credits

At the same time as the end credits are playing, the film shows the Wonkavator rising higher and higher. See more »

Alternate Versions

The HD-DVD/Blu-ray transfer uses the full exposed film width (including the space on the left where the soundtrack would go) for most of the runtime, even though the framing was composed for the smaller width. As a result, most of the movie is off-center now. For sections where this extra width was not used, such as the opening sequence and some Oompa Loompa songs, the (smaller) image is shifted over and windowboxed. The Warner Brothers home video department seems to have no plans to correct this. See more »

Connections

Featured in Terms and Conditions May Apply (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Cheer Up, Charlie
(uncredited)
Lyrics and Music by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley
Performed by Diana Lee
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User Reviews

 
Simply indispensable
25 December 2004 | by Don MuvoSee all my reviews

All the ideas that Rould Dahl puts into his book "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory" are here in an imaginative visual form appropriate to the time it was made. A lot of attention was paid to the sets and visual effects, clever special effects such as a trap door and miniturization testify to the care that the producers put into making this movie. The theme of the movie is difficult for adults. There are bad children in the world. They come from bad parents, they're not created by emulation, but rather the parents "produce them", much like chocolate is produced in a factory. The factory is populated by miniature people named oomphaloopas that remind the listener at intervals of Dahl's moral points: Too much TV is bad for children, books should be read instead, and children need to adhere to an ethical code of some sort in order to grow up strong. And who knew Gene Wilder had such a beautiful singing voice! The music is some of the best show music of it's time, including "The Candy Man".


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | UK

Language:

English | French | German | Italian

Release Date:

30 June 1971 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$526,633, 4 September 2016

Gross USA:

$526,633

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$530,154
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Wolper Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (theatrical)

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)| Dolby Digital (1996 Re-Release)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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