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Photos of Star Ace Toys’ New Scars Of Dracula Statue, Coming in 2018 from Sideshow Collectibles

Star Ace Toys' new Scars of Dracula statue wants to suck your blood, and Sideshow Collectibles revealed photos of the statue commemorating the 1970 Hammer horror film.

Read on for more details and photos of Star Ace Toys' new Scars of Dracula statue, and visit Sideshow Collectibles' official website to view the full set of photos of the collectible depiction of the iconic Christopher Lee character.

From Sideshow Collectibles: “Star Ace Toys is proud to introduce the debut figure for their new line of 1/4 scale mixed media polyresin statues - Count Dracula! Featuring Mr. Christopher Lee as he appeared in the 1970 film "Scars of Dracula," this figure captures the beloved movie icon in his most notable role.

Christopher Lee is the symbol of Dracula, Lee fixed the image of the fanged vampire in popular culture.

Now, you can feel the fear of Count Dracula with this large-scale statue! The detailed diorama
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: Vault Of Horror (1973)

I’ve always had a great appreciation and fondness for horror anthologies, and I devoured horror comics as a kid; whether it was House of Mystery or Creepy magazine, they never failed to fire my imagination in short, sharp bursts. When the Romero/King collaboration Creepshow (1982) came out, my dream of seeing these kinds of stories translated to film was nothing but revelatory. I soon discovered it was not the first of its ilk, and began a journey through dusty video store shelves looking for its long-lost relatives. One of my first (and favorite) finds was Vault of Horror (1973), a five-fingered punch to my nascent, pubescent, omnibus-loving heart.

Released by Cinerama Releasing stateside in March and produced by Amicus (the fine folks behind its predecessor, Tales from the Crypt), Vault of Horror (aka The Vault of Horror, for the easily confused, I guess) was not as well received by critics as Tales,
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: The Legend Of The 7 Golden Vampires (1974)

By the early ‘70s, Hammer films was wheezing and sputtering just to stay alive. Their attempts to stay current with the changing tides of horror were often misbegotten and misdirected (Dracula A.D. 1972, anyone?) as the plots continued to recycle shopworn ideas when audiences were ready for more modern concerns, such as hulking maniacs with chainsaws. In essence, time was passing Hammer by, and they were willing to try anything. Hence we arrive at The Legend of the 7 Golden Vampires (1974), a delightful elixir of Dracula and…Kung Fu. This was the last gasp for Hammer’s beloved franchise, and it’s a very worthy burial.

Aka 7 Brothers Versus Dracula, 7 Brothers and a Sister Meet Dracula, 7 Golden Vampires, and Enter The Dracula (no, but who screwed up that marketing?), Legend was a co-production between Hammer and Shaw Brothers, the immortal Chinese martial arts film studio that would crank out 10, sometimes 15 films a year of kinetic,
See full article at DailyDead »

Drive-In Dust Offs: I Drink Your Blood (1970)

I Drink Your Blood (1970) is as old as I am. Unlike me, however, it shows very little wear and tear; a loud and proud exploitation horror diorama from an age when all boundaries of good taste and reason were pushed to the breaking point. If you only have room in your life for one rabies-infested satanic hippies movie, make it I Drink Your Blood.

This film is the blueprint for creating your very own grimy, crude, offensive B classic. First, you need a backer. Enter producer Jerry Gross, known at the time as a king of grindhouse hype, modeled after William Castle. For example, when he rereleased two of the ‘60s Mondo films (real rituals and customs from exotic locales, documentary style), Mondo Cane and Mondo Pazzo on a double bill, he paraded around actors in tribesmen costumes to sell the authenticity of the films. He offered director David Durston
See full article at DailyDead »

Rob Zombie’s 31, Black Christmas (1974) & More Movies Coming to Shudder in December

  • DailyDead
Gather your fright-loving family members, fill your cup to the brim with egg nog, and find a comfy spot around the TV (or computer) screen, because enough horror movies to fill Santa's sleigh are coming to the streaming service Shudder this December, including Rob Zombie's 31, Bob Clark's Black Christmas, and many more.

Press Release: This December, there’s oh so much under Shudder’s tree. But before you get unwrapping, let’s shake the boxes a bit… We have something special for everyone, inside.

Love clowns? Coming exclusively to Shudder is Rob Zombie’s latest, 31, a vicious and characteristically Zombie film. Which is to say it’s dirty, mean and, from the get, right up in your face.

Looking to stay in? We’ve got a very special Shudder exclusive in Shrew's Nest. Directed by Juanfer Andrés & Esteban Roel (and produced by Alex de la Iglesia), this elegant,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Nine Greatest Horror Film Stars of All Time

  • Cinelinx
Halloween is almost here. This is the time of year for putting your favorite horror films in the DVD player. When you think of horror movies over the decades, there are certain actors whose names are indelibly linked to the horror genre. In honor of Halloween 2016, Cinelinx looks at the nine greatest horror films stars of all time.

9) Robert Englund: He made a name for himself as the burnt-faced dream demon Freddy Kruger. His body of horror work includes...A Nightmare On Elm Street, Anoes 2: Freddy’s Revenge, Anoes 3: Dream Warriors, Anoes 4: The Dream Master, Anoes 5: The Dream Child, Freddy’s Dead: The Final Nightmare, Wes Craven’s New Nightmare, Freddy Vs. Jason, The Phantom of the Opera, Nightmare Café, Night Terrors, Mortal Fear, The Mangler, Urban Legend, Sanitarium, The Funhouse Massacre, etc.

8) Jamie Lee Curtis: The woman who created the trend of females
See full article at Cinelinx »

Scars Of Dracula Sixth Scale Figure from Star Ace Toys & Sideshow

  • DailyDead
The great Christopher Lee may no longer be with us, but he will live on forever through his many memorable performances. One of his most iconic turns in front of the camera came from playing the titular bloodsucker in 1970's Scars of Dracula, a nightmare-inducing role depicted with incredible detail by Star Ace Toys' new sixth scale figure from Sideshow.

From Sideshow Collectibles: "Not just an actor but also soldier, spy, linguist, Knight of the British Empire and heavy metal enthusiast, Christopher Lee made over 250 films in his long career, including appearing in the most beloved film franchises of all time, James Bond, Star Wars and Lord of the Rings.

The role that thrust Lee into the global spotlight was a time honoured character that had already become indelibly associated with another actor. But Lee’s portrayal and popularity in the role of Dracula for Hammer Films made the tall
See full article at DailyDead »

Don’T Bother To Knock (1952)

The icon-establishing performances Marilyn Monroe gave in Howard HawksGentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and in Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959) are ones for the ages, touchstone works that endure because of the undeniable comic energy and desperation that sparked them from within even as the ravenous public became ever more enraptured by the surface of Monroe’s seductive image of beauty and glamour. Several generations now probably know her only from these films, or perhaps 1955’s The Seven-Year Itch, a more famous probably for the skirt-swirling pose it generated than anything in the movie itself, one of director Wilder’s sourest pictures, or her final completed film, The Misfits (1961), directed by John Huston, written by Arthur Miller and costarring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.

But in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952) she delivers a powerful dramatic performance as Nell, a psychologically devastated, delusional, perhaps psychotic young woman apparently on
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Christopher Lee Tribute – Mahoning Drive-in Theater – October 3, 2015

  • CinemaRetro
By Hank Reineke

Perhaps it is only fitting that area meteorologists would forewarn ominously that the Mahoning Drive-in Theater’s “Christopher Lee Tribute” might take place on a cold and dark and stormy night. After all, it was the villainous film legacy of the actor – who passed away at age 93 on June 7th of this year – to have frightened generations of moviegoers in such a bleakly nightmarish rain-soaked setting. As it happened, while the shivery autumnal chill on Saturday night was undeniable, there was – happily - nary a sprinkle of precipitation to obscure one’s windshield view of the drive-in’s massive CinemaScope screen.

The Mahoning Drive-in, located amidst the Pocono Mountains surrounding Lehighton, Pennsylvania, is – quite frankly – an anomaly amongst the anomalies of surviving drive-in theaters. Whilst most remaining drive-ins have been forced to move cautiously and expensively to digital projection systems or else suffer their screens going dark,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Exclusive Interview with What We Do In The Shadows’ Jemaine Clement

Bloody, funny, and made for lovers of classic vampires by fans of the genre, What We Do in the Shadows is already one of my favorite horror comedies. With the movie coming out on Blu-ray and DVD on July 21st, I had a chance to catch up with Jemaine Clement (Flight of the Conchords), who co-wrote, co-directed, and starred in the vampire mockumentary.

For those that didn't know, What We Do in the Shadows started off as a short film and we talked about the process of turning it into a full feature, his first vampire movie memory, possibilities of a sequel, and more:

The Blu-ray version of the film includes your original short film that you released in 2006. Why did this particular idea stick with you long enough to make a feature film out of it?

Jemaine Clement: Well, there was a funding initiative by the New Zealand
See full article at DailyDead »

Horror Channel to broadcast Christopher Lee night

This week brought the rather sad news that British screen legend Sir Christopher Lee had passed away aged 93, and now the Horror Channel has announced that it is set to pay tribute to the iconic actor by clearing its post-9pm schedule on Thursday July 2nd for a special Christopher Lee night.

9pm – The Devil Rides Out (1968)

10.55pm – Dracula, Prince Of Darkness (1966)

12.45am – Scars Of Dracula (1970)

2.35am – To The Devil A Daughter (1976)

“We feel the movies chosen for the night represent some of his most iconic characters and performances during his time with Hammer Films and in the horror genre,” said Stewart Bridle, manager of the Horror Channel. “Watching these you realise why he was so highly respected as a fantastic character actor who could both be a stoic hero and also a terrifying villain. He will be greatly missed but he lives on through his amazing legacy of movies
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Last Great Horror Icon Is Gone: Where Are the Future Scare Masters?

  • Cinelinx
With the death of horror film legend Christopher Lee, the last of the legendary honor guard of horror has passed on. He was part of an elite group that created the horror genre. Lee’s passing is a reminder that it’s been a long time since we had a new horror film superstar. Is the day of the horror film specialist gone forever? Where are the big-screen boogie-men for the 21st century?

Once upon a time there were a group of actors, known as the ‘screen boogiemen’ who created the horror film/monster movie genre (starting in Universal Studios and later in Hammer Studios.) They were specialists who understood the psychology and performance style of horror cinema and became legends in the industry. The first was silent film star Lon Chaney Sr. (Phantom of the Opera, London After Midnight, the Hunchback of Notre Dame, the Unholy Three, the Monster,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Horror Channel is paying tribute to the late Christopher Lee with a movie marathon

The Horror Channel is paying tribute to the late Sir Christopher Lee with a marathon of four classic movies.

Stewart Bridle of the Horror Channel announced today (June 12) that Thursday, July 2 will be 'Christopher Lee Night'.

Christopher Lee 1922-2015: 6 of the acting icon's greatest movie roles

"We feel the movies chosen for the night represent some of his most iconic characters and performances during his time with Hammer Films and in the horror genre," Bridle announced.

"Watching these you realise why he was so highly respected as a fantastic character actor who could both be a stoic hero and also a terrifying villain. He will be greatly missed but he lives on through his amazing legacy of movies."

The salute kicks off with the Hammer gem The Devil Rides Out at 9pm, followed by Dracula: Prince of Darkness at 10.55pm.

1970's Scars of Dracula is scheduled for 12.45am,
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Horror Channel is paying tribute to the late Christopher Lee with a movie marathon

Horror Channel is paying tribute to the late Christopher Lee with a movie marathon
The Horror Channel is paying tribute to the late Sir Christopher Lee with a marathon of four classic movies.

Stewart Bridle of the Horror Channel announced today (June 12) that Thursday, July 2 will be 'Christopher Lee Night'.

Christopher Lee 1922-2015: 6 of the acting icon's greatest movie roles

"We feel the movies chosen for the night represent some of his most iconic characters and performances during his time with Hammer Films and in the horror genre," Bridle announced.

"Watching these you realise why he was so highly respected as a fantastic character actor who could both be a stoic hero and also a terrifying villain. He will be greatly missed but he lives on through his amazing legacy of movies."

The salute kicks off with the Hammer gem The Devil Rides Out at 9pm, followed by Dracula: Prince of Darkness at 10.55pm.

1970's Scars of Dracula is scheduled for 12.45am,
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

R.I.P. Christopher Lee – Here Are His Ten Best Roles

The day monster kids have dreaded for some time has arrived. Mournful, nostalgic, and melancholy – it’s the end of an era for more than one generation of horror fans. It seemed like Christopher Lee would live through all eternity, but unlike some of the characters he played, there’s no bringing him back to life this time. He made it to 93 and went out on a high note, appearing in the final Hobbit film just this past winter. He had an amazing career of fantastic performances and remains the greatest villain actor in film history. Rip to the last classic horror star and thank you for all the monster memories.

Christopher Lee was married to his wife Birgit (Gitte) for 54 years.

Here, according to Movie Geeks Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Sam Moffitt, and myself, are Christopher Lee’s ten best roles.

10. Frankenstein

It’s only fitting that The Curse Of Frankenstein,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Prolific British actor Sir Christopher Lee dies at age 93

  • Cineplex
Christopher Lee, an actor who brought dramatic gravitas and aristocratic bearing to screen villains from Dracula to James Bond enemy Scaramanga, has died at age 93.

Lee appeared in more than 250 movies, including memorable roles as the wicked wizard Saruman in The Lord of the Rings trilogy and the evil Count Dooku in two of George LucasStar Wars prequels. But for many he will forever be known as the vampire Count Dracula in a slew of "Hammer Horror" movies - the gory, gothic thrillers churned out by the British studio in the 1950s and 1960s that became hugely popular.

He railed against the typecasting, however, and ultimately the sheer number and range of his roles - from Sherlock Holmes to the founder of Pakistan - secured his place in film history.

"I didn't have dreams of being a romantic leading man," Lee told The Associated Press in 2002. "But I
See full article at Cineplex »

Christopher Lee, Actor Who Made Dracula Count Again, Dies at 93

Christopher Lee, Actor Who Made Dracula Count Again, Dies at 93
Christopher Lee, the second most famous Dracula of the 20th century — an impressive feat — and a memorably irrepressible villain in James Bond film “The Man With the Golden Gun,” in the Star Wars films and in “The Lord of the Rings” pics, has died. He was 93.

Lee appeared in 10 films as Count Dracula (nine if his uncredited role in the comedy “One More Time” is excluded).

His first role for famed British horror factory Hammer Films was not the Transylvanian vampire, however, but Frankenstein’s Monster in 1957’s “The Curse of Frankenstein.” His close friend Peter Cushing, with whom he would co-star in horror films frequently, starred as the Baron.

Lee made his first appearance as the sharp-toothed Count in 1958’s “Horror of Dracula.”

For reasons not quite certain, he skipped the 1960 sequel “Brides of Dracula,” but he returned to the role for 1965’s “Dracula: Prince of Darkness” — a movie
See full article at Variety - Film News »

20 Greatest Movie Villains Played By British Actors

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Mustache twirling aficionados of evil all know that when Hollywood wants ‘bad’ they go British, regardless of the characters actual nationality. Hollywood’s decision to cast Brits as bad guys started in the early days of cinema when American actors were reluctant to play villains so producers looked elsewhere.

They settled on the British because their accent was thought to represent sophistication and intelligence (clearly Hollywood producers have never been to Essex) and had anti-imperialistic connotations from the big, bad British Empire of yesteryear.

The British accent was to become a modern-day equivalent of the white hat/black hat stereotype of good and evil and was used to help audiences instantly recognize that one stereotype most people would never meet in real life; the evil genius. Almost a 100 years later and that tradition is still as strong as ever.

Join us as we take a look at some of
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Actors Who’ve Played the Same Character the Most Times

  • Cinelinx
With Hugh Jackman currently negotiating to play Wolverine for a seventh and eighth time, Cinelinx takes a look at actors who’ve played the same role eight times or more. Who has played the same character most often? Come in and find out.

Hugh Jackman has already played Wolverine five times--x-Men (2000), X2: X-Men United (2003) X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), X-Men Origins: Wolverine (2009), and The Wolverine (2013)—as well as a cameo in X-Men:First Class (2011). Soon we’ll be seeing him fully clawed again on the big screen in X-Men: Days of Future Past. Recently, he told Collider that he might shoot Wolverine 3 and X-Men: Apocalypse “back-to-back”, which would make a total of eight times (9 times with the cameo) that he’ll portray the Canadian mutant.

You might be thinking “Wow! That’s amazing! I’ve never heard of anyone playing the same role so many times.” Well, for those who may not know it,
See full article at Cinelinx »

Doctor Who: the film careers of Patrick Troughton & Tom Baker

Feature Alex Westthorp 9 Apr 2014 - 07:00

In the next part of his series, Alex talks us through the film careers of the second and fourth Doctors, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker...

Read Alex's retrospective on the film careers of William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, here.

Like their fellow Time Lord actors, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee, Patrick Troughton and Tom Baker also shared certain genres of film. Both appeared, before and after their time as the Doctor, in horror movies and both worked on Ray Harryhausen Sinbad films.

Patrick George Troughton was born in Mill Hill, London on March 25th 1920. He made his film debut aged 28 in the 1948 B-Movie The Escape. Troughton's was a very minor role. Among the better known cast was William Hartnell, though even Hartnell's role was small and the two didn't share any scenes together. From the late Forties, Troughton found more success on the small screen,
See full article at Den of Geek »
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