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8/10
Jaw-Droppingly Delirious, Demented Bad Film Fun!
weho900698 March 2005
Get a group together to witness POINT OF TERROR which, as others will have noted, is not a horror movie (but *is* pretty horrible!). The film is, rather, a sexploitation melodrama about a ruthless, ladder-climbing lounge singer, Tony Trelos (Peter Carpenter) who gets involved both intimately and professionally with Andrea (Dyanne Thorne), the sex-starved, alcoholic wife of a wheelchair-bound music industry mogul. Everything about this film is a howler: script, acting, production values (tin-foil sets), and the music...the music...oh, those songs! On top of everything else we have a protagonist who likes to "drop trou" and show off his humpy bod (and there ain't nuthin' wrong with that!). Peter Carpenter must have an ego the size of Mount Rushmore to flash us a lingering butt-shot when he emerges from a shower as well as a fully nude side-angle shot where his leg just barely hides the family jewels from view. WOOF!!! Did he ever do a Playgirl spread? It certainly would have been up his alley... Tempestuous blonde bombshell co-star Dyanne Thorne is a force to be reckoned with (and how!) with a rack that won't quit, and her buoyant topless scene in a swimming pool is one of the film's highlights (along with her many excursions into overacting). Watch for scenes with Joel Marston as the wheelchair-bound husband who can't seem to sit still (although he's supposed to be utterly incapacitated from the waist down), and in one poolside scene catches himself just before crossing his legs! Leslie Simms in a supporting role as one of Andrea's lush friends is a scene stealer, while Paula Mitchell as Sally turns in a tragically robotic performance. It just keeps getting better and better...! The film's cinematography is often laughably blurry when "focusing" on Carpenter during his lounge act at The Lobster House (yes, The Lobster House, I kid you not), or else it's bizarrely "creative" (as happens during a moonlit, beach-side sex scene involving select points of view shown in split-screen). Oh, and the wardrobe...and hair!!! Look, if you're not a fan of "bad cinema", don't bother with this title since you won't even be able to appreciate the astonishing epic quality of this carefully crafted bomb. But if you're like me, and get sick chuckles out of films that tried really hard but totally missed the mark, then rent this one immediately or buy it (Rhino DVD released POINT OF TERROR as part of a multi-film set titled HORRIBLE HORRORS in October of 2004). This one gets a whopping 8 out of 10 just because its so terribly awful that it's engagingly entertaining in repeat viewings (and how cool is that!?!) -- how often does a "bad" film come along that still yields new stuff to ridicule on repeat viewings? POINT OF TERROR is a winner! And speaking of winners, what EVER happened to a talent like Peter Carpenter??? Enquiring Minds Want To Know!!!
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9/10
Classic trash. Better than Beyond the Valley of the Dolls!
Maciste_Brother1 March 2007
Crown International Pictures + Peter Carpenter = match made in trash heaven!

The legendary Peter Carpenter started his film career starring in a Russ Meyer film, VIXEN. He then made three other films before disappearing from the face of the earth. And what films they were. BLOOD MANIA and this one, POINT OF TERROR (I haven't seen "LOVE ME LIKE I DO" but with such a great title, I'm dying to see it). Carpenter stars as a lounge singer who sounds/looks like Tom Jones. The story is totally inconsequential. It's about people scheming to murder other people who murdered other people, etc. Basically, people using people because of money and greed kinda of story.

With better production values than BLOOD MANIA, POINT OF TERROR sometimes looks/sounds like a Russ Meyer film, without the extreme excess that's usually found in Russ Meyer's films. But the rest is still there: sex, trash, hopelessly dated dialogue, violence, buxom babes, beefcake, greed, 1970s gaudiness, did I say trash? It's Russ Meyer-lite.

I love everything in POINT OF TERROR: the music (did Carpenter really sing those songs?), the fashion, the sudden sporadic bursts of violence, the focus on sex, sex, sex. The swingers dialogue: "Hey, Chickie". The acting. The tackiness of it all. Though not as memorably over-the-top as BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE DOLLS, POINT OF TERROR is, IMO, much more entertaining than the over-baked BTVOTD.

Favorite scenes: the opening credits, with Carpenter singing/dancing in a red fringe get-up. The beginning on the beach (Dyanne Thorne's bikini is definitely not sexy). The musical bits. The sex scenes (the triptych one is cool). The scene around the swimming pool when the husband confronts Thorne. Ole! The "surprise" ending. But nothing beats the scene with Leslie Simms, as Fran, in that purple hat. Fran is such a badass! Arf.

Michael J. Weldon, of Psychotronic Films fame, wrote in his books that he hates Peter Carpenter films, which surprises me because Peter Carpenter films are so perfectly Psychotronic: entertainingly bad. The main reason Weldon (and other fan boys) dislikes POT and BLOOD MANIA is probably because the focus is mainly on hunky Peter Carpenter (both films were produced by Carpenter himself...ah, narcissism). But for me, this obvious difference is what makes these trashy movies unique/one of a kind.

Long live Peter Carpenter.
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Beyond the something of the something
pubguy4713 December 2008
A woman cowering in fear. A masked madman brandishing a butcher knife. "Demons long locked in the depths of the mind come out to destroy the weak and believing!" Explore "the outer limits of fear". That's the poster. I don't think I've ever seen a movie so misrepresented by the advertising. Or happier about it. Not another tired, early 70s slasher film by any means, this riot is about a sleazy side-burned lounge singer (Peter Carpenter) picked up by a sleazier female record promoter (Dyanne Thorne) who sees something special in the guy. We can guess what it is, since most of the movie is shot at Carpenter's crotch level. Meanwhile, Thorne's jealous wheelchair-bound husband isn't going to take his wife's infidelity sitting down. Enter Thorne's kittenish daughter Lots of wonderfully bad faux 70s pop songs, over-heated dialogue and teeth-gnashing, and two outlandish murders. Dig it.
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A Sparkling Gem of Badness
mhoffmanartist5 January 2003
Warning: Spoilers
Those with a true, well-developed epicurean taste for badness should definitely seek out this oddball film. It fails on many, many levels, but it ain't for lack of trying. Admittedly, the "time loop" sequence at the end is weak, but after watching all the way through, what else can you reasonably expect--Citizen Kane? Tony Trelos' Tom Jones impressions are as embarrassing as the original, which is not to say Jones is an untalented man. There are several scenes which offer a lot more than many snobby armchair reviewers will care to admit, if they even mention them--case in point being the swimming pool scene, in which the crippled husband charges his wife repeatedly in his wheelchair, to the roars and strains of a Mexican bullfight. Is this film good? Is it bad? Decide for yourself, but definitely do NOT avoid. Whatever doesn't kill you can only make you stronger, so embrace!
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4/10
3 time loser on Pittsburgh's Chiller Theater
kevinolzak12 October 2013
Like its earlier companion feature "Blood Mania," 1971's "Point of Terror" was plainly a vanity piece for writer-producer-star Peter Carpenter, a Vegas hoofer whose death remains shrouded in mystery to this day, dates as varied as late 1970, late '71, even the late 70s-early 80s (this last posted by actress Leslie Simms). As an actor, he displays neither emotion nor charisma, and appears to be miming his three songs, all non hits from (believe it or not) Motown! ("Lifebeats" was actually recorded by The Supremes, minus Diana Ross). Imagine a singer so bad he has nightmares on the beach about his singing, and his apartment looks like his decorator was 'Bela Lugosi!' Another surprising name prominently featured in the opening credits is future Oscar winning editor Verna Fields, who earned her Academy Award for her work on Spielberg's "Jaws" just a few years later. The director is Alex Nicol, who at least had a genuine horror title on his slim resume behind the camera, 1958's "The Screaming Skull" (he had far more credits as an actor). Leslie Simms fondly recalls her working with Peter Carpenter, who may have been a likable fellow off camera, but insisted on playing lowdown sleazeballs in his own films. He juggles three different women in this picture, even flirting with the attractive Miss Simms, yet insists on rushing off to get married even after one girl announces she's pregnant! Dyanne Thorne (whom I first saw in STAR TREK's "A Piece of the Action") had already appeared with Carpenter in 1970's "Love Me Like I Do," here playing the man hungry wife of wheelchair bound record mogul Joel Marston, best remembered by genre buffs for 1957's "The Disembodied," plus his film debut in the 1949 Charlie Chan finale "The Sky Dragon" ("Blood Mania" had featured Jacqueline Dalya, from 1941's "Charlie Chan in Rio"). For all the wildly misleading ads depicting this as a horror film, the only scene that qualifies is Dyanne's bloody murder of Marston's first wife, just a brief flashback. Considering all her misdeeds, her character just isn't as maniacal as she should be, as one reviewer commented, the whole thing remains curiously tame, rather than outrageously lurid (it's never boring however). "Point of Terror," being part of Crown International's television package, debuted on Pittsburgh's Chiller Theater on Feb 26 1977, paired with second feature "House of Horrors" (1946), broadcast twice more over the next 4 years ("Blood Mania" earlier debuted on Nov 27 1976, paired with 1972's "Gargoyles").
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1/10
Or, what happens when a singer strays too far from The Lobster House...
moonspinner5511 March 2017
Wretched melodrama with softcore overtures has hip-grinding entertainer at a beachfront nightclub flirting his way into a recording contract, but the busty lady executive who discovered him--and who was apparently instrumental in the accident that paralyzed her husband!--could ruin his chances for stardom. Vanity project for B-movie actor Peter Carpenter, who co-produced and co-authored the original story for this, his final starring feature before his death. For aficionados of cinematic trash, the ridiculous final reel (starting with a man-woman tussle on the lawn, followed by a laughable tag) may be worth the abysmal rest. Carpenter, who had previously played a Mountie in a Russ Meyer flick, transparently emulates Meyer's penchant for bare breasts and behinds mixed with bloodshed, yet his plot is too ordinary (and his singing talents too minimal) to stir up much excitement. 'Terror'? Truly. * from ****
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Sordid, recrementitious tower of glorious 70's sleaze.
EyeAskance18 September 2005
Warning: Spoilers
Lurid thriller from the Crown International Pictures vault provides one of the sleaziest tales of wanton lust, infidelity, and unscrupulous greed ever lensed, with a few violent on-screen murders thrown in for good measure. The inimitable Dyanne Thorne is in it, and that fact alone makes it worthy of investigation.

A tacky Tony Bennett-style lounge singer abandons his pregnant girlfriend when he becomes intimately involved with the bitchy, high-strung wife(and soon-to-be widow) of a bigshot record industry mogul. Just to prove what a no-class opportunist scumbag this creep is, he soon takes to screwing her dim-witted stepdaughter as well.

If you're on a hunt for cheap thrills in the immortal 70s drive-in/grindhouse tradition, Look no further than POINT OF TERROR...it's such an uncurbed blast of raffish overindulgence that it makes something as famously profligate as BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE DOLLS appear subdued by comparison. Surprisingly, it actually works in a fallacious, all-wrong sort of way, though a preposterous non-ending cripples it significantly.

A potentially gratifying watch for fans of excessive, tawdry thrillers, and such a distinctly 1970s relic that you might come away from it smelling like Hai-Karate.

4/10
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7/10
The Point of "Point of Terror"
modspell15 March 2005
The previous reviewer (weho90069) summed up the this film quite succinctly, but did he stress the title's musical contribution enough? Only by seeing it would you be able to know just how eye-rolling a production number can actually be. A horrendous musical intro kicks off the film as the opening credits roll, with the lead character Tony Trelos aping about on stage in a blazing, red suede suit with waterfall fringe. The 'live' performances go from bad to worse, as we soon see the actor singing to the rafters in his regular venue, The Lobster House (that is, after a quick shag before curtain). It is in this setting we see Andrea shopping him with her eyes, adding him up as he performs seemingly only for her. Andrea's cool, calculating gaze tells us that it's more than stage talent she's wanting to sign.

Lyrically speaking, the theme song "Lifebeats" (which is repeated throughout) is the narrative that clues us in on the inner world of Sir Trelos. It is this song that he cuts for his first record that proves to be too much for his new rep Andrea, as she abruptly halts the recording session with a dash of her hand, barking out a "FROM the TOP!" It was either ending too soon for her, or else she just couldn't sign off on the vocal at that point. Either way, it gives us another chance to hear it some more. The singer does have his moments vocally-speaking, but we all do when we play American Idol Home Edition. The draw for Trelos' fans is obviously not in his throat.

I recommend you watch POT, but better still, really listen--

"Lifebeats turning into Lovebeats... Lovebeats turning into Lifebeats, moving in and taking over me...".

Wow, man.
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3/10
Wish it was as cool as the poster
udar5514 November 2008
Warning: Spoilers
Lounge singer Tony Trelos (Peter Carpenter) thinks he has hit the big time when he hooks up with Andrea (Dyanne Thorne), wife and talent scout for wheelchair bound music producer Martin. What Tony doesn't count on is Andrea having more interest in flings and offing her husband than having Tony shatter the Billboard top 10. Throw in her bizarre past (Martin's wife was murdered mysteriously & his daughter hates Andrea) and it looks like Andrea is one tough femme fatale.

Pushed as a horror flick (check out the poster), this is actually a pretty bland thriller-sexploitation melodrama. The film's only fantasy type element is that Trelos wakes up at the end and discovers it was all a dream...right before meeting Andrea for the first time. Cue ominous music. Lead Carpenter sure seems to like himself as he produced and co-wrote the screenplay in which he sings and shows of his muscles a lot. He also co-wrote and starred in BLOOD MANIA the year previous to this. Future ILSA star Thorne is good as the manipulative Andrea though.
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1/10
Dollar Dreck
dvoyy26 May 2008
I got this at a dollar store several weeks ago. It's the EastWestDVD edition that pairs it with James Earl Jones' Blood Tide.

After reading the other reviews here, I feel the need to warn people away from dollar store versions of this film because the nudity has been completely edited out and this movie has nothing else going for it.

To give an example of just how shoddy a product the EastWestDVD print is, there's a section that's five or more minutes long that repeats in its entirety.

I don't know what annoys me more, that the print was mutilated, or that I'm going to have to track down a uncut version and suffer through it again. Why do I do this to myself?

Avoid!!!
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8/10
Enjoyable chunk of 70's drive-in junk
Woodyanders26 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Smarmy and ruthlessly ambitious, but handsome and sexy lounge singer Tony Trelos (a perfectly slimy portrayal by hunky beefcake Peter Carpenter) works at a local nightclub in order to keep himself afloat. Tony meets mysterious wealthy man-hungry vamp Andrea Hilliard (the almighty Dyanne Thorne in peak predatory form), who promises to secure Tony a record contract with a major record label. However, things don't work out exactly like Tony hoped they would. Director Alex Nicol, working from a blithely trashy script by Ernest A. Charles and Tony Crechales, relates this entertainingly tawdry tale of greedy, deceit, and betrayal at a steady pace, delivers a handy helping of tasty gratuitous female nudity and leering soft-core sex, and tosses in a few murders for good measure. Moreover, the enthusiastic cast attack the lurid material with definite zest: Thorne and Carpenter really sink their teeth into their juicy parts, Leslie Simms has a hammy field day as Andrea's booze-sodden best gal pal Fran, Joel Marston contributes a pleasingly nasty turn as Andrea's bitter and overbearing crippled husband Martin (Andrea's big confrontation with Martin in front of a pool is a total corker!), and Lory Hansen brings considerable sweet charm to her role as Andrea's cute, perky, innocent stepdaughter Helayne. Better still, the groovy swinging songs, Tony's marvelously kitschy sub-Tom Jones nightclub act (Tony's first number in which he's wearing a ghastly red jumpsuit complete with flowing fringe is a tacky gut-buster!), Robert Maxwell's garish cinematography, and the gloriously lame "surprise" twist ending add immensely to this movie's substantial campy appeal. A complete schlocky hoot.
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Awful
Michael_Elliott14 March 2008
Point of Terror (1971)

BOMB (out of 4)

I need to admit that I have no idea what this film was about or what it was trying to say but here's the so-called plot. Tony (Peter Carpenter) is a nightclub singer at the Lobster Lounge where he's hoping to catch a break but most of the time he ends up in the beds of older women. Lately Tony has been having grisly nightmares of women being brutally murdered. Soon, one of these older woman (Dyanne Thorne of Ilsa fame) offers him a record contract. Tony, thinking he's going to get popular, starts acting like a star, which upsets the older woman.

Make any sense? I really don't know what the horror elements are doing in this film because it's mostly about Tony and his record contract. The horror elements are mainly shown through the nightmare images but trust me, hearing Tony sing is a lot scarier than anything we see violence wise. I kept watching this movie and expecting it to turn into a horror film but it remained a record contract film with a few doses of mystery, which were just downright boring and hard to follow as well.

The director at least knew to make the women get naked and yes boys, that includes Ilsa herself. Dyanne Thorne might not be the best actress around the block but she's got a lot of what the others don't have, if you get my drift. There's also another silly sex scene on a huge boulder (wouldn't that cause bad scratches to the back?) that the director shows using split screens. The film is bad enough to get a few laughs, especially the look at the bar, which seems to be decorated out of colored tin foil. Point of Terror fails on all other levels but I'd recommend you giving the soundtrack to someone you really hate.
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1/10
No cover. No Minimum.
nogodnomasters22 September 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I am not sure what the point was, and I am not too sure about the terror except for maybe that one scene.

Tony Trelos (Peter Carpenter) is a "Tom Jones" style singer at The Lobster House. He is eyed by Andrea Hillard (Dyanne Thorne) of National Records. She is married to Martin (Joel Marston- an Eric Roberts style actor) who is in a wheel chair. She is constantly cheating on him and is upset he is always spying on her because he suspects her of cheating-go figure. Oh yea, love triangle with the daughter (Lory Hansen) who is finally introduced when the film is two thirds over.

Available on multi-packs. Not worth the time to watch.

Guide: sex and nudity (Dyanne Thorne aka Ilsa)
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4/10
I give it 4 out of 10 for the boobs.
soulexpress23 August 2017
Warning: Spoilers
This masterpiece of sexploitation opens with nightclub singer Tony Trelos (Peter Carpenter) in a fringed red suit, lip-synching to a bombastic pop song that makes Tom Jones seem understated. He becomes involved, both professionally and sexually, with Andrea (Dyanne Thorne), the buxom wife of Martin (Joel Marston), the wheelchair- bound owner of a major record label. Andrea is both alcoholic and sex-starved, of which Tony takes full advantage in the hope that it will advance his singing career.

Peter Carpenter, who co-produced, must have had a whale-sized ego. How else to explain the lingering crotch shot as he lights a cigarette or the lengthy butt shot when he steps out of the shower (without a drop of water on him)? Not to mention a nude side-angle shot in which Tony's leg just barely obscures his one-eyed wonderworm. If he hadn't died suddenly in late 1971, Carpenter could have been a Playgirl centerfold.

He also sang his own songs, and what songs they were! One seems to feature the lyric, "Life beans turning into lima beans." (I probably heard it wrong.) Incredibly, the music was produced by veteran songwriter Hal Davis, and a closing credit states that the recordings were "Courtesy of Motown Records." Were Marvin Gaye, the Jackson 5, and Stevie Wonder not bringing in enough cash to satisfy Berry Gordy, Jr?

Some of my favorite parts of POINT OF TERROR: a sex scene on the beach using split screens to show the fornicators at different angles (I counted six); Andrea topless in a swimming pool--with a rack so big, it's amazing she got her head under the water; Andrea's husband Martin, who can't seem to keep still, even though he's crippled from the waist down; when Martin becomes so angry that he tries to beat the crap out of Andrea from his wheelchair (it doesn't go well); when Tony goes home with Andrea's drunken pal Fran (Leslie Simms); when Tony goes horseback riding with Andrea's stepdaughter Helayne (Lory Hansen) and gives her a horsey-ride of his own; Tony also knocks up his main girlfriend Sally (Paula Mitchell), but dismisses the pregnancy as her problem. Sally, however, doesn't see it that way and gets her point across to Tony in a most severe manner. Let's just say, he'll never make another record.

I've heard this film described as "Russ Meyer lite," a fitting description when it's compared to Meyer's overblown BEYOND THE VALLEY OF THE DOLLS. I like POINT OF TERROR better though, if for no other reason, that there's no male character who shows himself as having female breasts and changes his name to "Superwoman." (I wish I had made that up, but no.)
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5/10
Flat but mildly amusing melodramatic horror
drownnnsoda18 March 2017
Tony Trelos is a club singer at a seaside bar. Wanting more out of his career, he is approached by a woman on a beach who owns a record label with her crippled husband. Tony's involvement and exploits with her are more dangerous than he's aware of, however, as she's guilty of a murder, and capable of another.

The second piece of celluloid sleaze that Peter Carpenter wrote and starred in after the atmospheric (and underrated) "Blood Mania," "Point of Terror" is a significantly less thrilling picture—far more talky and significantly less moody. It also seems to be cribbing elements of "Blood Mania" in a lot of ways, as it follows borderline identical plot arcs that have been minutely tweaked: Man becomes involved with wealthy woman. Woman is unstable and a murderess. Family member enters the picture and complicates matters further. Same formula, different canvas.

The film is peppered with some of the most ridiculously "seventies" musical numbers you'll ever see, and also boasts a significant amount of skin from a buxom Dyanne Thorne and the hunky Carpenter. There is a nice doubled-over twist at the end of the film that is clever but rather cheap, and the general impression I got after it was over was that Carpenter seemed to have wanted to do-over "Blood Mania," but this time invoke as much of Jess Franco's "Succubus" as he could.

All in all, "Point of Terror" is a middling thriller that, while mildly amusing, is more or less a rehash of Carpenter's prior (and better) film. It is, like "Blood Mania," relatively well-shot, but it lacks the performances and moodiness that made the former so watchable. For a piece of grindhouse sleaze, "Point of Terror" is watchable, but it's lacking both in spirit and inventiveness. 5/10.
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1/10
Peter Carpenter is no Tom Jones.
mark.waltz12 October 2016
Warning: Spoilers
The point of terror is now in the middle of my brain, a senseless migraine as a result of 50 minutes of occasional yelling and screaming between two different couples; one man a pop singer in tight pants and a red fringe cape, and an older, apparently rich man in a wheel chair with a harpy wife who somehow ends up with the singer, leaving his own wife. At least that's how I saw it in this mess of a sexual thriller that attempts to throw in some supernatural nonsense involving demons either in dreams or in the film's supposed reality. I don't know. I was too frustrated to care.

This just never grabs the opportunities for a believable, conceivable story, and just gave me a reason to toss out this DVD that was a part of the Millcreek "Pure Terror" collection. Perhaps the acid trip survivors of the early '70's got it, but the only thing I got was ripped off. Peter carpenter survives with his dignity, if not his pants, on, but the acting by the blonde bimbo harpies is something that makes Patty Duke's braying in "Valley of the Dolls" seem calm in comparison. Their acting is even more bellowing than some of the early John Waters films which are at least fun watching. This was just hideous from the opening scene.
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5/10
A cheese fan's dream
Leofwine_draca27 April 2016
It's fair to say that a LOT of cheesy horror films were made in America in the 1970s, and this is one of them. It's a so-bad-it's-good piece of entertainment for sure, and not even a horror film really despite the title and plotting; a guy has weird dreams, but the on-screen horror element is kept to a bare minimum.

Instead this feels more like a softcore thriller, with a bizarre lead role for Peter Carpenter, who seems to be channelling the spirit of Tom Jones (or he wishes to, at least) for the most part. Carpenter plays a nightclub singer (the musical scenes are excruciating) who hooks up with a femme fatale, played by the frequently topless Dyanne Thorne. Thorne, of course, is notorious for her role as ILSA, SHE-WOLF OF THE SS, and she proves to be a statuesque and arresting presence in every scene here.

POINT OF TERROR has much in common with the psycho-thriller genre that flourished in the wake of Hitchcock's PSYCHO. I was particularly reminded of the excellent Hammer film, A TASTE OF TEAR. However, the execution is so cheap and cheesy that it's impossible not to laugh at the thing, despite the best intentions; that twist ending in particular is a real hoot. B-movie lovers will delight in it.
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4/10
Cheesy of Terror
Rainey-Dawn17 January 2016
Peter Carpenter's display of himself. He was one of the writers, the lead actor and singer for the film. He basically showcased himself in this film.

The movie is cheesy but a bit fun to watch. The opening of the film is a real hoot - I found myself laughing out loud as Peter sang and danced with the opening credits rolling. I thought to myself "is this guy trying to imitate Tom Jones?" LOL. It made for a fun and funny opening scene.

The rest of the film isn't all that bad, it's watchable, but it's not a good horror film. If you want see a really good Carpenter horror movie then find one by John Carpenter not Peter Carpenter. If you want a laugh then you might like 'Point of Terror'.

4/10
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7/10
Andrea, She-Wolf of the Music Industry.
BA_Harrison2 April 2013
Point of Terror has the funniest opening credits I've seen in a long while, with its writer and 'star' Peter Carpenter singing a god-awful song while gyrating crazily in a red, mega-tassled jacket and circulation-restricting trousers. It's truly cringe-worthy stuff, boding well for fans of trash cinema, for whom horribly dated fashion, awful music and crap dancing is all part of the fun.

As success-hungry lounge singer Tony Trelos, Carpenter doesn't disappoint, regaling the viewer with further diabolical warbling throughout while squeezing into more ridiculously tight fashion disasters. Tony's unmistakable sense of style and rugged manliness doesn't go unnoticed by the ladies, with big-breasted queen-bitch Andrea Hilliard (Dyanne Thorne)—wife of wheelchair-bound music mogul Martin (Joel Marston)—soon digging her claws in, promising Tony fame in exchange for sex.

Their special arrangement soon begins to go awry, however, with Andrea dragging her heels in getting Tony his record contract and Martin becoming suspicious of his wife's unorthodox business arrangements. An unfortunate pool-side 'accident' puts paid to Martin's jealousy, but when Andrea's sexy step-daughter Helayne (Lory Hansen) shows up at her father's funeral, catching Tony's roving eye, and the singer's ex-girlfriend announces that she is pregnant, the stage is set for further acts of lustful violence.

Deceit, death, money, greed and sex: Point of Terror features all the expected ingredients of a regular murder/mystery potboiler, but distinguishes itself with a glorious excess of trashiness; not only do we the get all the gaudy early-70s trappings, with strong primary colours and some groovy split screen editing accentuating the tastelessness, but there's gratuitous nudity (narcissist Carpenter taking any opportunity to bare his ass and Thorne, the one and only She Wolf of the SS, flaunting her impressive assets), alcohol and drug abuse, sexual harassment in the workplace, and random violence, including a frenzied knife attack and a high-dive onto some rocks. It's far from great film-making, but it sure is entertaining.

Unbelievably, the film's outrageous finalé manages to be just as jaw-droppingly nutzoid as the opening credits, with a shock twist and a trite cyclical narrative device that makes a mockery of all that has gone before, but which somehow suits the whole crazy affair to a 'T'.
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1/10
Zero points (of terror...) out of ten
Coventry8 December 2005
Irredeemably bad & cheesy 70's horror (if you can call it horror...) that trickily lured me in renting it because it stars Dyanne Thorne, a couple of years before her "Ilsa" breakthrough. Exactly as it was the case with "Blood Sabbath", this turned out a painful rookie mistake. "Point of Terror" is unendurably boring trash with a completely uninteresting plot (about a lousy pop-singer trying to screw together a record contract), bleak characters, absolutely no tension and the most redundant and overlong flashback sequence in the history of horror cinema! Thorne stars as the spoiled wife of a record company owner who's not afraid to kill every person that gets in the way of her getting what she wants. I fell asleep twice during this movie, each time for a good ten minutes, and still nothing had happened by the times I woke up again. No matter how much I appreciate independent low-budget horror productions, there's nothing even remotely recommendable about "Point of Terror". The story becomes even more inept halfway through the film, with the introduction of totally new characters but, if you're smart enough, you'll never reach this point (...of terror)
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Sleazy, greasy Seventies aesthetics
BrunoMatteisNumberOneFan3 December 2001
Warning: Spoilers
***SPOILERS*** ***SPOILERS*** Tony Trelos is a slick crooner at a nightclub called the Lobster House. Screaming and waking up from a nightmare (of his own terrible, terrible nightclub act) on a secluded beach he meets evil- looking and decadent Andrea (Dyanne Thorne) who's wearing a tasteless bikini. They get involved, as she's the wife of the crippled and bitter head of National Records. After one night of love- making in the pool she kills her defenceless wheel chaired husband. When the beautiful Helayne (daughter of the crippled homicide- victim) arrives, Tony falls in love with her, and he's torn between the two women. Things get outta hand and Tony throws a foul- mouthed Andrea off a cliff when she puts pressure on him for witnessing the murder and refusing his upcoming record contract. Things get even worse when Tony is suddenly shot dead by his waitress ex- girlfriend Sally, who's pregnant with his child. And then the magic starts... Tony screams and wakes up at the beach (it was all a bad dream), Andrea comes up to him, and highlights from the movie follows, only to be topped by Tony waking up and screaming once more!!! THE END. Very original.

This is not a good film. The Lobster House is decorated with tinfoil, Tony Trelos looks like a disturbing mixture of Tony Curtis and musician Herb Alpert, and a lot of screen time is used showing him with his shirt off. Note that Carpenter who plays this ambitious Vegas sleazebag is also writer and producer. Scenes of Helayne and Tony horseback- riding is pure (and poor) excess, and Tony's crazy/ridiculous songs are downright awful. Pointless scenes of flashbacks to Tony's unhappy and clichéd childhood are seemingly endless. The ending with it all being a bad dream, and then a bad dream within a bad dream is not clever, just stupid. Some sequences appear experimental. I guess this isn't intentional, but proves a laughable lack of basic filmmaking skills. A clumsy and boring movie. Avoid. Avoid.
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Sleazy, greasy Seventies aesthetics
BrunoMatteisNumberOneFan30 November 2001
Tony Trelos is a slick crooner at a nightclub called the Lobster House. Screaming and waking up from a nightmare (of his own terrible, terrible nightclub act) on a secluded beach he meets evil- looking and decadent Andrea (Dyanne Thorne) who's wearing a tasteless bikini. They get involved, as she's the wife of the crippled and bitter head of National Records. After one night of love- making in the pool she kills her defenceless wheel chaired husband. When the beautiful Helayne (daughter of the crippled homicide- victim) arrives, Tony falls in love with her, and he's torn between the two women. Things get outta hand and Tony throws a foul- mouthed Andrea off a cliff when she puts pressure on him for witnessing the murder and refusing his upcoming record contract. Things get even worse when Tony is suddenly shot dead by his waitress ex- girlfriend Sally, who's pregnant with his child. And then the magic starts... Tony screams and wakes up at the beach (it was all a bad dream), Andrea comes up to him, and highlights from the movie follows, only to be topped by Tony waking up and screaming once more!!! THE END. Very original.

This is not a good film. The Lobster House is decorated with tinfoil, Tony Trelos looks like a disturbing mixture of Tony Curtis and musician Herb Albert, and a lot of screen time is used showing him with his shirt off. Note that Carpenter who plays this ambitious Vegas sleazebag is also writer and producer. Scenes of Helayne and Tony horseback- riding is pure (and poor) excess, and Tony's crazy/ridiculous songs are downright awful. Pointless scenes of flashbacks to Tony's unhappy and clichéd childhood are seemingly endless. The ending with it all being a bad dream, and then a bad dream within a bad dream is not clever, just stupid. Some sequences appear experimental. I guess this isn't intentional, but proves a laughable lack of basic filmmaking skills. A clumsy and boring movie. Avoid. Avoid.
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2/10
Bad
dbborroughs30 August 2009
Warning: Spoilers
Time has not been kind to this over long not very good thriller. I think time has erased any and all good will that the filmmakers had, which considering how dull boring and jaw droppingly awful this film can be wasn't much to begin with. The basic plot has a lounge singer (at the local Lobster House) having dreams of murder and adultery. Actually its a dream that seems to be coming true. This is one of those hip and happening films that was made in the late sixties and early seventies that was made by a bunch of people who didn't know what hip and happening was. they were the sort of people that were into Plastics, like in the Graduate. I can't see this film ever connecting with an audience. The musical sequences have to be seen to be believed, certainly the opening jumpsuit piece deserves to be more than enough proof that some people should never be allowed to dance. Recommended only for insomniacs and those wishing to atone for some past wrong.
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6/10
a mediocre film that should have been better
john2290031 March 2007
I gave this film a 6 and is that ever generous. The reason I gave it that much is simply because of Dyanne Thorne. Without her, this movie would have totally tanked and there'd be no legitimate reason to ever see it. The problem with this mediocre film is that it doesn't go far enough. There should have been more nudity instead of those god awful songs. The singing isn't so bad but oh those lyrics just make my brain hurt thinking about 'em! The sexploitation elements are all there alright but they are very underused, which basically was the trouble with a lot of these kinds of films made in the 70's: they just didn't go far enough. Had they pressed a hard R rating instead of a very soft R, this movie probably would have been a lot more watchable than it is.
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3/10
lousy movie about a nightclub singer who'll do anything to make it big
FieCrier3 July 2005
This starts with man with "jazz hands," a red fringe jacket, and tight red pants. I'm scared already! Intercut with his song and dance is what appears to be a woman's death (we'll see the actual scene towards the end of the movie). He wakes up screaming. He meets a woman who's a record producer's wife.

Though this is in a box set called "Horrible Horrors," it's barely a horror movie. We see a flashback to the death of the record producer's first wife. We see a death by drowning, and another by falling, and another by gunshot. Essentially, this is more the story of a small-time lounge singer who's willing to do anything to rise to the top.

The last scene of the movie involves someone waking up screaming. Was everything we watched a dream, or a premonition? Easier just to call it bad writing, a "horrible horror," and a waste of time.
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