Man in the Wilderness (1971) - News Poster

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Blu-ray Deal of the Week: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35

There are many great sales online this week, but the folks at Amazon are treating us to something special: 3 Warner Archive Blu-rays for $35.

While this might not be the lowest that we’ve seen prices on these Blu-rays (the WB Shop has had 5 for $50 sales in the past that have included Warner Archive Blu-rays), it is certainly a good deal on great films.

It looks as though many of these discs are selling quickly, and the time out from when they’ll ship for some of the more popular titles is growing. Below you’ll find a list of the titles which are included in this promotion.

As always, these are affiliate links and will help support this site, should you choose to make any purchases through them.

42nd Street A Mighty Wind Beware The Batman: Dark Justice Season 1 Part 2 Big Sleep Body Snatchers Cat On A Hot Tin Roof
See full article at CriterionCast »

Off The Shelf – Episode 96 – New Releases for Tuesday, July 12th 2016

In this episode of Off The Shelf, Ryan and Brian take a look at the new DVD and Blu-ray releases for the weeks of, July 5th and July 12th 2016.

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News Arrow Academy: October Titles Arrow Video: October Titles Scream Factory: Carrie, Child’s Play Olive Films: Olive Signature Kino Lorber: Hangover Square, The Undying Monster Warner Archive: Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Man in the Wilderness (http://www.blu-ray.com/news/?id=19331) Mill Creek: Miami Vice & Knight Rider, + Hammer Double Features Hammer Horror – 8 Film Collection Flicker Alley: New Cinerama Titles Links to Amazon

7/5

Absolution The Adderall Diaries Blood and Black Lace Boy & the World The In-Laws Only Yesterday Suture Swinging Cheerleaders Taking of Pelham One Two Three

7/12

Belladonna Of Sadness Carnival of Souls Everybody Wants Some Van Gogh Green Room Invisible Invaders Jia Zhangke, A Guy from Fenyang Lego
See full article at CriterionCast »

Today in Movie Culture: The Road to 'Captain America: Civil War,' Celebrating the Work of Leonardo DiCaprio and More

  • Movies.com
Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Franchise Recap of the Day: Get ready for Captain America: Civil War with McU Exchange's supercut of scenes that lead us to the new movie's plot (via Geek Tyrant):   Oscar Nominee Parody of the Day: Above Average lampoons the way Spotlight spotlights Boston as such a terrible place:   Reworked Trailer of the Day: The Revenant is sort of a remake of 1971's Man in the Wilderness, so here's a trailer for the earlier version in the style of the new (via Cinematic Montage Creators):   Actor in the Spotlight: Get ready for Leonardo DiCaprio to finally win an Oscar this weekend by watching a supercut of all his...

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See full article at Movies.com »

A 2015 Slifr Movie Treehouse Digest

The Slifr Movie Treehouse (the acronym stands in for the title of my blog, Sergio Leone and the Infield Fly Rule) is a place where I like to gather a few of my movie-writing pals and exchange long e-mails on the way the movies shaped up for us in the year just left behind. It’s been a few years since I’ve undertaken this project, but the time felt right again, so I invited the very talented critical voices of Brian Doan, Odie Henderson, Marya Murphy and Phil Dyess-Nugent to take part, and to my great happiness they all agreed. (Bios for each writer can be found at the conclusion of each of their individual posts, which can be accessed by clicking below on the title of each post.)

What follows here are samples from the 16 posts we submitted over the week of January 11-17, and we’ll start
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Revenant review – a walk on the wild side

Leonardo DiCaprio gives his all in Alejandro González Iñárritu’s visceral, icebound survival story

The legend of American frontiersman and fur trapper Hugh Glass, who was left for dead after being mauled by a bear in the early 1820s, inspired Richard C Sarafian’s 1971 film Man in the Wilderness, in which Richard Harris starred as “Zachary Bass”. Now it returns to the screen in a film based in part on Michael Punke’s 2002 book The Revenant: A Novel of Revenge.

Related: Revenant is meaningless pain porn | Carole Cadwalladr

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Movie Review: The Revenant (2015)

The Revenant comes about a year after Alejandro González Iñárritu became more of a household name with last year’s film, Birdman, starring Michael Keaton. For people that were paying closer attention, Iñárritu has been around for a good decade and a half delivering films with mixed results.

The Revenant tells the story about frontiersman, Hugh Glass. If you want to maximize your view of this film, I highly recommend that you do not read up on his story. This is not the first adaptation on the story of Glass. There was a loose adaptation on his story with 1971’s Man in the Wilderness. However, I feel that this recent adaptation feels more authentic than the previous adaptation. More on that in a little bit.

Leonardo DiCaprio plays Hugh Glass who is with a team of men on a fur trade expedition gone wrong. This team of explorers flee from
See full article at Destroy the Brain »

Richard C. Sarafian, Director Of "Vanishing Point", Dead At Age 83

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Cinema Retro mourns the passing of director Richard C. Sarafian, who has passed away at age 83. Sarafian may not be a household name but in the film industry he was held in great regard, especially by maverick younger directors like Quentin Tarantino who emulated his work and style. Crusty, outspoken and often littering his sentences with curses that would make a longshoreman blush, Sarafian was an uncompromising man when it came to his personal visions of how his movies should be constructed. He started off directing episodes of classic TV series including I Spy and Batman and his best known work from the 1960s is the eerie "Living Doll" episode of The Twilight Zone in which Telly Savalas as a cruel stepfather gets his comeuppance at the hands of possessed toy doll. Sarafian graduated into feature films and directed the movie which gained him fame, if not fortune: Vanishing Point,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Richard C Sarafian obituary

Director of the mystical road movie Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point was one of a crop of existential road movies in the early 1970s – the others included Two-Lane Blacktop and Electra Glide in Blue – which quickly gained cult status. Its director, Richard C Sarafian, who has died aged 83, never made another film that struck such a resounding chord with audiences, countercultural or otherwise. No matter: the appeal of Vanishing Point was enduring enough to make him a noted, even influential, figure. Quentin Tarantino thanked Sarafian in the closing credits of his own four-wheeled thriller, Death Proof (2007), and the Scottish band Primal Scream signalled their admiration for Vanishing Point by naming a 1997 album after the movie. "It's always been a favourite of the band," said the singer Bobby Gillespie. "We love the air of paranoia and speed-freak righteousness."

This 1971 film concerns the Vietnam veteran Kowalski (played by Barry Newman after the studio overruled Sarafian's first choice,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Richard C Sarafian obituary

Director of the mystical road movie Vanishing Point

Vanishing Point was one of a crop of existential road movies in the early 1970s – the others included Two-Lane Blacktop and Electra Glide in Blue – which quickly gained cult status. Its director, Richard C Sarafian, who has died aged 83, never made another film that struck such a resounding chord with audiences, countercultural or otherwise. No matter: the appeal of Vanishing Point was enduring enough to make him a noted, even influential, figure. Quentin Tarantino thanked Sarafian in the closing credits of his own four-wheeled thriller, Death Proof (2007), and the Scottish band Primal Scream signalled their admiration for Vanishing Point by naming a 1997 album after the movie. "It's always been a favourite of the band," said the singer Bobby Gillespie. "We love the air of paranoia and speed-freak righteousness."

This 1971 film concerns the Vietnam veteran Kowalski (played by Barry Newman after the studio overruled Sarafian's first choice,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

TVLine Mixtape: Your Favorite Songs From Castle, Supernatural, Revenge, Covert Affairs and More!

TVLine Mixtape: Your Favorite Songs From Castle, Supernatural, Revenge, Covert Affairs and More!
Who rocks more than TVLiners? Nobody! And you proved that by responding to our first TVLine Mixtape post with an overwhelmingly enthusiastic request for more TV tunes.

You ask, we deliver. Or, to paraphrase Elton John: Our mixtape is our song, and this one’s for you.

Here are some more great songs from recent TV episodes, complete with artist and album information in case you want to add them to your permanent collection.

You know the drill, but just in case, a reminder: Spoilers abound, and we chose songs we liked – but we always want to hear your thoughts and suggestions.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Supernatural Season 8 Premiere: Hatchets, Flashbacks, Secrets & Laughs

Supernatural returned for its eighth season with flashbacks, purgatory hatchets, a few laughs and a very secretive, paranoid Dean (Jensen Ackles). Don’t worry Dean fans – the eldest Winchester brother hasn’t changed too much, he still enjoys burgers and fries.

Season 8 began one year after Dean disappeared. Covered in blood, he emerged out of purgatory at a couple’s campsite, with a strange hatchet in his left hand and a gun in his right. Dean was also harboring a demon, who helped him escape from purgatory, in his left arm. The mystery behind their allegiance will take us through Supernatural’s mid-season finale. “Man in the Wilderness” from Styx was the song that ushered in Dean’s return.

Most of the premiere was spent catching us up to speed on what took place over the last year.

“Most days felt like 360 degree combat.” – Dean

While Dean was fighting his way through purgatory,
See full article at BuzzFocus.com »

'Supernatural': The showrunners talk Sam and Dean's new dynamic and all those flashbacks

'Supernatural': The showrunners talk Sam and Dean's new dynamic and all those flashbacks
Supernatural has a new showrunner, Jeremy Carver, returning to the show after some time away helming Syfy’s Being Human, and it looks like he is working to strike a balance between giving fans something fresh and staying close to the show’s roots. Supernatural wouldn’t be the same without classic rock, and tonight’s season 8 opener delivered on that musical note straight away with Styx’s “Man In The Wilderness.” Tommy Shaw croons in the 1977 song, “Another year has passed me by / … What kind of man have I become?”

Indeed, that’s the question Sam and Dean will
See full article at EW.com - Inside TV »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Styx: Grand Illusion/Pieces of Eight Live

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Jan. 31, 2012

Price: DVD $14.98, Blu-ray $19.98, DVD/2 CD Combo $29.98

Studio: Eagle Rock

Styx guitarist Tommy Shaw sails away in The Grand Illusion/Pieces Of Eight Live.

Styx: The Grand Illusion/Pieces of Eight Live finds the seminal 1970s rock band serving up complete live renditions of two of their most popular albums, 1977′s The Grand Illusion and 1978′s Pieces of Eight. The show was recorded in November 2010 at the Orpheum Theater in Memphis, Tenn.

The 20-song, two-hour-plus performance of the pair of multi-platinum albums is recorded in DTS-hd Master Audio, Dolby Digital 5.1, and Lpcm Stereo.

Included as a bonus on the DVD and Blu-ray is the featurette “Putting on the Show,” which looks at the work that went into creating the live concert event.

In addition to the DVD and Blu-ray, Eagle Rock is issuing a DVD/2 CD combo, featuring a two-disc audio version of the concert.

Here
See full article at Disc Dish »

Pyromaniacs: Hollywood’s Bad Boys

A man who works with his hands is a laborer;

a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman;

but a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist.

Louis Nizer

In his indispensable film study text, Understanding Movies, Louis Gianetti held forth on what separated craftsmanlike directors from those who rise above the norm:

“…what differentiates a great director from one who is merely competent is not so much a matter of what happens, but how things happen…”

In other words, Gianetti continued, the difference was in how effectively the director used form – visual style, composition, editing, mise en scene, and the rest of the directorial toolbox – to “…embody (a film’s) content.”

But with the rise of big budget blockbusters in the 70s and 80s, there came the ascendancy of a breed of director for whom content mattered less than form.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

John Hillcoat Helms The Revenant -- Christian Bale "In Talks" To Star

John Hillcoat (The Road) is set to direct The Revenant and Christian Bale is in talks to star , according to Bloody Disgusting. This grim tale of survival and revenge is based on the true story of an adventurer who goes West with a group of fur trappers in 1822. When he's badly mauled by a bear, his companions bury him while still alive rather than trouble with returning to civilization. Miraculously, he survives ... and then proceeds to hunt down the men.

The movie has been once done before, in 1971 with Richard Harris. Then it was called Man in the Wilderness, although we're told that this isn't going to be a remake.

Next Showing:

Link | Posted 5/27/2010 by Jim

Christian Bale | John Hillcoat | The Revenant
See full article at ReelzChannel »

John Hillcoat Directing 'The Revenant' With Christian Bale

John Hillcoat Directing 'The Revenant' With Christian Bale
Director John Hillcoat hasn't had a lot of luck, lately. The Road (in my opinion, the most underrated film of last year) was given one of The Weinstein Company's half-dead releases. His follow-up, an adaptation of the novel The Wettest Land, has fallen through due to financing. But a man of Hillcoat's reputation doesn't lack for work, even if he can't always get financing, and Bloody Disgusting is reporting he's attached to direct The Revenant. Christian Bale is in talks to star, and Mark L. Smith penned the script.

The Revenant is based on Michael Punke's novel, which is itself based on the true story of Hugh Glass. A man of many adventures, Glass goes West in 1822 in the employ of Captain Andrew Henry to do some profitable fur trapping. Glass is attacked by a bear, and badly injured. Miraculously, he survives, but the terrain makes it impossible to carry him back.
See full article at Cinematical »

Natalie Merchant, ‘The Man in the Wilderness’: The New Video

Natalie Merchant

“Leave Your Sleep,” the new album from Natalie Merchant, is her first album of new material in seven years. That’s a long time for a pop singer to be on the sidelines–long enough from Justin Bieber to grow from a tween to a teen, and other performers to move from their prime to well past it. Merchant, the former frontwoman for 10,000 Maniacs, draws on poetry for her new album, combing the verse of such writers as E.E. Cummings and Odgen Nash with her own original melodies and arrangements. The juxtapositions of lyrics and music are sometimes jarring, sometimes inspired–sometimes both. On “Adventures of Isabel,” she matches Nash’s poem with a country hoedown; on “Topsyturvey-World,” Merchant takes a poem by 19-century author William Brighty Rands and adds a reggae beat. And on the song “The Man in the Wilderness,” Merchant combines children’s Mother
See full article at Speakeasy/Wall Street Journal »

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