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Mache alles mit (1971)

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Cast

Credited cast:
Marion Forster Marion Forster ... Dagmar Hintze
Astrid Boner Astrid Boner ... Ellen Hintze
Harry Kalenberg Harry Kalenberg ... Carl Hintze
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Oliver Domnick Oliver Domnick ... UvD
Imka Eberle Imka Eberle ... Mädchen im nassen Kleid
Elisabeth Felchner Elisabeth Felchner ... Christina
Leopold Gmeinwieser Leopold Gmeinwieser ... Mann auf Boot
Karin Götz Karin Götz ... Mädchen im Erziehungsheim
Wolfgang Hellmund Wolfgang Hellmund ... Kriminalbeamter
W.R. Heyking W.R. Heyking ... Professor Cornelius
Richard Kley Richard Kley ... Theo v. Landis
Dunja Lock Dunja Lock ... Fräulein Schmitt
Rosl Mayr Rosl Mayr ... Frau Grabl
Ursula Mellin ... Fürsorgerin
Gernot Möhner Gernot Möhner ... Gefr. Mosinger
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Storyline

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Details

Country:

West Germany

Language:

German

Release Date:

9 July 1971 (West Germany) See more »

Also Known As:

A Bit of Everything See more »

Filming Locations:

Munich, Bavaria, Germany

Company Credits

Production Co:

Lisa-Film See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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User Reviews

 
"Modern People don't have Taboos"
13 June 2009 | by Thorsten_BSee all my reviews

Sailing to German cinemas on the wave of the hugely popular "Schuldmädchenreport"-films (aiming to depict the "real" sex-life of schoolgirls and boys – while, in fact, delivering ultra-trash pseudo-pornography), "Mache alles mit" has never achieved similar fame nor cult status – although it must have been among the first movies trying to compete with the "Schoolgirls' Reports". The title, roughly translatable into "I do everything" or rather: "I'll join in into everything" is what 17-year old Dagmar considers to be the open-mind that people "in modernity" need to have. Thus she embraces in all sorts of sexual adventures (which are mainly shown in flashback sequences). That may sound as if she were a post-68 self-confident girl who knows what to want, where and with whom; but of course, films like these disguise conservative messages with a almost neurotic passion for the (so defined) "sickness" of "open love" (proof is usually, as is here, given by insights into the sex- and drug-dominated world of the communes). Therefore, Dagmar is presented as curious, but still shameful girl forced by social change to abandon the good values of her upbringing and "join into everything"; that is because, she is told and believes, "modern people don't have taboos". However, the viewer is never left in doubt that sexual freedom is in fact the road to hell and that chastity and "true love" will prevail once young people truly learn to appreciate what life has to offer. Which is why a conservative student is needed to show Dagmar that "join into everything" will end up "having nothing". As one would expect, this good-looking, likable guy is far from overt intellectualism and has no hesitation to wholeheartedly laugh at the misfortunes of those who don't share his "wisdom". (Given the fact that author/director Nachmann has faced trouble during the Nazi years and was forced to hide behind pseudonyms, it is astonishing to see shades of ultra-right-wing ideology on this films' bottom line.) In the very end, police is forced to step in, for underage Dagmar earlier took part in an orgy (by answering to a newspaper ad!) that is prosecuted as "unlawful"; and we don't know (but can only hope, the film implies), that she will have learned her lesson. Trash entertainment meets conservative ideology meets sexual exploitation (unusual for the genre, there's quite a lot of rape included): in all, an interesting mixture.


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