Little Murders (1971) - News Poster

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Little Murders

The blackest of black comedies confronts us with an urban worst case scenario — Jules Feiffer’s ‘social horror’ movie is like a sitcom in Hell, with citizens numbed and trembling over the unending meaningless violence. What was nasty satire in 1971 now plays like the 6 o’clock news. Too radical for its time, Feiffer and director Alan Arkin’s picture is more painfully funny, and frightening, than ever.

Little Murders

Region B Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator (UK)

1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date April 30, 2017 / Available from Amazon UK £22.99

Starring: Elliott Gould, Marcia Rodd, Vincent Gardenia, Elizabeth Wilson, Jon Korkes, John Randolph, Doris Roberts, Lou Jacobi, Donald Sutherland, Alan Arkin, Martin Kove.

Cinematography: Gordon Willis

Film Editor: Howard Kuperman

Production Design: Gene Rudolf

Original Music: Fred Kaz

Written by Jules Feiffer from his play

Produced by Jack Brodsky (and Elliott Gould)

Directed by Alan Arkin

Little Murders was one of the first new
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘The Good Fight’ Season 2 Review: CBS All Access’ Underrated Drama Is Still Really Mad About Trump

  • Indiewire
‘The Good Fight’ Season 2 Review: CBS All Access’ Underrated Drama Is Still Really Mad About Trump
For those seeking an escape from our current political climate, “The Good Fight” is without a doubt not for you. The “Good Wife” spinoff, returning for a second season on CBS All Access Sunday, March 4, has managed to do something many people of a liberal inclination have not: stay shocked. Stay astounded. Stay angry. Even the episode titles aim to keep the Trump presidency at the front of our minds; the Season 2 premiere, “Day 408,” just so happens to match with the number of days Trump will have been in office as of Sunday, March 4, when the episode premieres.

That rage is not directed singularly at Trump, but at the rest of the world, as Diane Lockhart (Christine Baranski) flips through the TV channels, finding herself unable to escape the news cycle even while she and fellow lawyers Luca (Cush Jumbo) and Maya (Rose Leslie) struggle to maintain their sanity on a day-to-day level.
See full article at Indiewire »

NYC Weekend Watch: Hitchcock-Grant, Double Features, Fellini & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Alfred Hitchcock and Cary Grant‘s collaborations are highlighted in a series that brings Notorious, Suspicion, and To Catch a Thief on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, respectively.

Prints of Max OphülsLetter from an Unknown Woman and Alan Arkin‘s Little Murders play on Saturday and Sunday, respectively.

A print of James and the Giant Peach
See full article at The Film Stage »

Lost Script by Jules Feiffer—Who Wrote Films for Nichols, Resnais and Altman—Sees the Light

29 years after he wrote it, Pulitzer Prize-winning Village Voice cartoonist and now-and-again screenwriter Jules Feiffer's "Bernard and Huey" will finally live on the big screen. Director Dan Mirvish and Bugeater Films more than doubled their Kickstarter goal this week, raising over $22,000 to mount Feiffer's comedy about two rekindled old friends and the women who complicate their lives. The characters were first introduced in 1957 in his eponymous Village Voice comic strip. (Check out the story of how Mirvish unearthed the script here.) Feiffer later wrote scripts for Mike Nichols' scabrous sex satire "Carnal Knowledge" (1971, based on his un-produced play), Alan Arkin's directorial debut "Little Murders" (1971), Robert Altman's "Popeye" (1980) and Alain Resnais' "I Want to Go Home" (a 1989 comedy about a cartoonist), among others. A WGA Lifetime Achievement Winner, Feiffer also wrote the 1961 Oscar-winning animated...
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Mining for Gold: Discovering the Lost Jules Feiffer Script Bernard and Huey

As one of the pillars of the Golden Age of the ’70s, Mike Nichols’ film Carnal Knowledge was a big influence on my own last movie, Between Us. So during post-production on Between Us, I happened upon a biography of Carnal Knowledge screenwriter Jules Feiffer that mentioned that he had several unproduced screenplays. Hmm, I thought: Feiffer had won a Pulitzer Prize for his cartoon strip in the Village Voice, he’d won a couple of Obies for his plays, and as a screenwriter, he’d written Popeye for Robert Altman, Little Murders, that Alan Arkin had directed, and won a Best […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine »

Mining for Gold: Discovering the Lost Jules Feiffer Script Bernard and Huey

As one of the pillars of the Golden Age of the ’70s, Mike Nichols’ film Carnal Knowledge was a big influence on my own last movie, Between Us. So during post-production on Between Us, I happened upon a biography of Carnal Knowledge screenwriter Jules Feiffer that mentioned that he had several unproduced screenplays. Hmm, I thought: Feiffer had won a Pulitzer Prize for his cartoon strip in the Village Voice, he’d won a couple of Obies for his plays, and as a screenwriter, he’d written Popeye for Robert Altman, Little Murders, that Alan Arkin had directed, and won a Best […]
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

The Forgotten: Alain Resnais's "I Want to Go Home" (1989)

  • MUBI
A regrettable result of the enormous arthouse success of the late Alain Resnais's early films (movies which transformed audience expectations of what a movie could be), is that a lot of his later films are relatively underseen. Perhaps his career would have taken a different path if he had ever made his dream project, Mandrake the Magician, potentially kickstarting the comic book adaptation boom years early...

Mandrake, the crime-fighting hypnotist, does actually make a kind of appearance in 1989's I Want to Go Home, at a costume party where guests dress as strip cartoon characters. Geraldine Chaplin bends gender as Mandrake, Gerard Depardieu, years before giving us his Obelix, convulses as an absurdly perfect Popeye ("I yam what I yam" sounds just the same with a French accent), and there's also Olive Oyle, Tweety Pie, Spiderman and Crepax's Valentina. And songwriter Adolph Green, in his only leading man role,
See full article at MUBI »

Bill Hader’s List of 200 Essential Comedies Everyone Should See

Bill Hader has come a long way since his stint on Saturday Night Live, creating many popular characters and impersonations such as Stefon, Vincent Price and CNN’s Jack Cafferty. He is one of the highlights in such films as Adventureland, Knocked Up, Superbad and Pineapple Express, and so it is easy to see why author Mike Sacks interviewed him for his new book Poking A Dead Frog. In it, Hader talks about his career and he also lists 200 essential movies every comedy writer should see. Xo Jane recently published the list for those of us who haven’t had a chance to read the book yet. There are a ton of great recommendations and plenty I haven’t yet seen, but sadly my favourite comedy of all time isn’t mentioned. That would be Some Like It Hot. Still, it really is a great list with a mix of old and new.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

First 'Birdman' Reviews Praise Michael Keaton

First 'Birdman' Reviews Praise Michael Keaton
The Venice International Film Festival has a long history of introducing Oscar contenders, with critically-acclaimed hits and Best Picture nominees such as The Wrestler, Black Swan and last year's Gravity making their world premieres at the festival. This year's Venice International Film Festival kicked off earlier this week with Alejandro Gonz&#225lez I&#241&#225rritu's Birdman, and if the overwhelmingly positive reviews are any indication, this could be the year's first major Oscar contender.

The story, as we saw in the first international trailer from last month, centers on Riggan Thompson (Michael Keaton), a washed up actor who used to play a famous superhero character on the big screen. He tries to mount a comeback by putting on a Broadway adaptation of Raymond Carver's What We Talk About When We Talk About Love, although little goes as planned.

Take a look at excerpts from some of the early reviews that have come in from Venice,
See full article at MovieWeb »

The First Birdman Reviews are Ecstatic; “Michael Keaton returns with the comeback of the century”

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu‘s Birdman premiered at the Venice Film Festival and the first reviews are coming out. They’re particularly glowing towards every aspect of the movie which I proudly placed on my 2014 list of Movies To See. The Cast, crew, screenwriting, and gorgeous cinematography all take praise in what is sure to be a contender come awards season.

Birdman tells the story of an actor (Keaton) – famous for portraying an iconic superhero – as he struggles to mount a Broadway play. In the days leading up to opening night, he battles his ego and attempts to recover his family, his career, and himself.

Alonso Duralde’s review at The Wrap says Iñárritu and cinematographer Emanuel Lubezki (Gravity) “have used camera and editing tricks to make the film look like one continuous take, and while it sounds gimmicky, the constantly moving camera and seeming lack of edits underscore the jitteriness
See full article at City of Films »

'Birdman' Movie Reviews from Venice are Glowing

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu's Birdman premiered at the Venice Film Festival only a short time ago and the first reviews are finally hitting the web and they are glowing as well as informative. Alonso Duralde's review at The Wrap the film tells us Inarritu and cinematographer Emanuel Lubezki (Gravity) "have used camera and editing tricks to make the film look like one continuous take, and while it sounds gimmicky, the constantly moving camera and seeming lack of edits underscore the jitteriness of the proceedings". Peter Debruge at Variety is ecstatic in his review opening with a paragraph that should get you primed to see the pic once it hits theaters on October 17: A quarter-century after Batman ushered in the era of Hollywood mega-tentpoles -- hollow comicbook pictures manufactured to enthrall teens and hustle merch -- a penitent Michael Keaton returns with the comeback of the century, Birdman or (The
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

Top Ten Tuesday – Top 10 Guilty Pleasure Movies

I have a curious habit, maybe you have it too, if you are a real movie geek, film fan, cinema addict, what have you.

A certain number of movies that I have seen and loved with all my heart were losers at the box office or were mercilessly slammed by critics, usually both. This doesn’t happen all the time, mind you. I know a bad movie when I see one. But several times I have seen a movie on opening day and loved it so much I was sure it would be a big hit and be loved by critics and film goers, nope, not all the time.

Here then is my own personal and highly eccentric top ten list, with some honorable mentions, of movies that lost out, yet I love them still, many of them desperately, hysterically, madly do I love these films, well anyway… let me tell you about it.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Movies This Week: October 25-31, 2013

It's a relatively light week for new releases and specialty screenings across town, which is honestly a big relief. If you're like the majority of the Slackerwood gang, you'll be exploring the films and panels of Austin Film Festival until next Thursday. Or perhaps you'll dive into the inaugural Housecore Horror Film Festival, covering both film and music. That doesn't leave a lot of room for squeezing in outside screenings, but this update should help you prioritize your moviegoing calendar if you do. 

Tonight, the Austin Film Society is hosting an event called "Chester Turner Overdrive" at the Marchesa. Just in time for Halloween, you can enjoy Black Devil Doll From Hell and Tales From The Quadead Zone along with director Chester Turner and actress Shirley L. Jones in attendance. Halloween night (next Thursday) will also allow you to get creeped out by the legendary David Cronenberg on the big
See full article at Slackerwood »

Gordon Willis on Lighting Marlon Brando in The Godfather

Gordon Willis is one of the truly great cinematographers of the second half of the 20th century, the man responsible for shooting everything from Woody Allen’s Manhattan and Francis Ford Coppola’s The Godfather to such lesser-known (but also brilliantly lensed) movies such as Hal Ashby’s The Landlord and Alan Arkin’s Little Murders. In the second of our ongoing series of exclusive Craft Truck videos, Willis talks about the approach he took to lighting Marlon Brando in the iconic opening scene of The Godfather.
See full article at Filmmaker Magazine_Director Interviews »

Ben Affleck, Alan Arkin, John Goodman and Bryan Cranston, to receive the “Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award” for “Argo” by Josh Abraham

HollywoodNews.com: The 16th Annual Hollywood Film Awards, presented by the Los Angeles Times, is pleased to announce that the feature "Argo," directed by Ben Affleck, will receive the "Hollywood Ensemble Acting Award." "We are very proud to recognize the ensemble cast of "Argo," for their dramatic and outstanding performances," said Carlos de Abreu, Founder and Executive Director of the Hollywood Film Awards. The 2012 Hollywood Film Awards has also announced that it will honor director David O. Russell with the "Hollywood Director Award"; Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro with the "Hollywood Supporting Actor Award"; Academy Award-winning actress Marion Cotillard with the "Hollywood Actress Award"; three-time Academy Award-nominated actress Amy Adams with the "Hollywood Supporting Actress Award"; producers Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner with the "Hollywood Producers Award"; writer/director Judd Apatow with the "Hollywood Comedy Award"; actor John Hawkes with the "Hollywood Breakout Performance Award" for "The Sessions"; and Quvenzhané Wallis
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Samantha Zalaznick: Mad Men Recap: "Little Murders"

  • Aol TV.
Samantha Zalaznick: Mad Men Recap:
Jaguar. Joan. Megan. Peggy. Women. Sex. Power. Framed by the Jaguar pitch, "The Other Woman" is a beautifully brutal depiction of prostitution -- cracking open a theme deeply embedded in the series, but never truly explored. Don's mother was a prostitute, all the men sleep with prostitutes. Our beloved Sal was fired for not sleeping with Lee Garner Jr. and Pete even suggested his wife (!) sleep with an editor to get his short story published back in Season 1. Opening with Don, Ginzo and a bunch of male freelancers throwing around the idea of Jaguar as your gorgeous mistress, the episode immediately turns women into possessions as the "beautiful yet unreliable" objects of desire. Don tells the team it's too vulgar to actually use the word mistress, but unlike their campaign, this episode slaps us in the face with the ugly reality behind the desperation and degradation that can come with the business of business,
See full article at Aol TV. »

George Clooney's List of Top 100 Films from 1964 to 1976

George Clooney has given a list of his Top 100 films from 1964 to 1976, which he feels was “the greatest era in filmmaking by far." It's hard to argue with that, many of my favorite movies come out of that era. In an interview with Parade Magazine the actor and movie geek explained his list saying...

There were great filmmakers—Mike Nichols, Hal Ashby, Francis Ford Coppola, Martin Scorsese—you go down the list of these insanely talented filmmakers all working at the top of their game and kind of competing with each other. Pakula, Sidney Lumet—I mean, you can just keep going down the list of these guys. And they were all doing really interesting films… That era [1964 to 1976] was a reflection of the antiwar movement, the civil rights movement, the women’s rights movement, the sexual revolution, the drug counterculture. All those things were exploding at the same time. And
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Read George Clooney’s List of the Top 100 Films from 1964-1976

Read George Clooney’s List of the Top 100 Films from 1964-1976
[1] George Clooney may be among the most prominent of celebrities, a fabulously wealthy, incredibly successful man at the very top of the A-list. But it seems there's a side of him that isn't so very different from film geeks like us who watch his movies. (Yes, all of that was a long-winded way of saying "Clooney: He's just like us!") For a recent interview about his upcoming Ides of March, which Clooney directed, produced, and starred in, Clooney revealed his top 100 films from 1964 to 1976, which he believes to be "the greatest era in filmmaking by far." The list is definitely cinephile-friendly, if not especially surprising: it includes tons of major classics and a handful of somewhat lesser known gems, all across a very wide variety of genres. Read the top 100 after the jump. Clooney told Parade [2] magazine that of that 100, his top five favorites are All the President's Men, Network,
See full article at Slash Film »

Hanna Says You Can Ronan But You Can't Hide

I’m gonna tell you an embarrassing story about myself. In high school, when I was in the theater group, we put on a production of Jules Feiffer’s play Little Murders. (You can hunt down Alan Arkin’s film version starring Elliot Gould if you are curious.) There was a part when the lights got all red and I had to run backstage and around through the gymnasium at top speed as our sound guy blasted “Tunic (Song for Karen)” by Sonic Youth. I loved it. The music was pumping, the red filters looked great, it was a blast of pure excitement.

It wasn’t until years later that I realized just how lousy I was in that dopey play.

I mention all this because Joe Wright’s new film Hanna has some marvelous clips floating around the Internet. Saoirse Ronan does a lot of running to the music
See full article at Ugo Movies »
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