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‘They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead’ Review: Orson Welles Documentary Is an Amusing Prequel to ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

‘They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead’ Review: Orson Welles Documentary Is an Amusing Prequel to ‘The Other Side of the Wind’
Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind” has been in post-production limbo for decades, and with time it became the golden unicorn of his filmography, a final potential masterpiece that remained uncompleted at the time of the rapscallion’s death. While Netflix stepped up to finish the project decades later, Welles’ experimental, semi-autographical drama about a washed-up filmmaker requires a fair amount of context for anyone except diehard Welles fans, especially if it’s expected to appeal to viewers on an international platform.

Enter “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead,” documentarian Morgan Neville’s endearing, playful overview of the false starts and sudden roadblocks that marred the production as Welles’ rocky career sped toward its conclusion. In effect, Neville has given the movie the prequel it deserves.

One one level, “The Other Side of the Wind” served as Welles’ cinematic autobiography. While he’d engaged with some
See full article at Indiewire »

Could Orson Welles Compete for an Oscar One Last Time?

  • Variety
Could Orson Welles Compete for an Oscar One Last Time?
It’s been nearly 50 years since Orson Welles called up friend and colleague Peter Bogdanovich, just before the young filmmaker flew to Texas to begin production on “The Last Picture Show,” to knock out some of the earliest footage of what would eventually become Welles’ swan song. Thanks to Netflix and a dedicated crew, “The Other Side of the Wind” finally saw the light of day at the Venice Film Festival on Friday, with a U.S. bow in Telluride set for this evening.

But here’s the pressing question for this space: Is it eligible for Oscar consideration? The answer is yes, but how the Academy — aggressively internationalized in recent years (which could help) — responds to the fever and wit of this acid-trip assemblage is yet to be seen. The film brims with contempt for the new Hollywood of the ‘70s, lionized to this day, and it chips away
See full article at Variety »

‘The Great Buster: A Celebration’ Review: Peter Bogdanovich’s Tribute to Old Stone Face Could Use More of His Spirit — Venice

  • Indiewire
‘The Great Buster: A Celebration’ Review: Peter Bogdanovich’s Tribute to Old Stone Face Could Use More of His Spirit — Venice
Buster Keaton was a born showman, performing in his parents’ vaudeville act from the age of four as a “human projectile” who got thrown around stage like a dart — he even had a handle on his back. Despite that, “Old Stone Face” — who was far more expressive than that enduring moniker suggests — is said to have only gotten slightly injured twice in more than 10,000 childhood performances.

That’s just one of the facts offered by Peter Bogdanovich’s “The Great Buster: A Celebration,” a loving documentary tribute to the Silent Era icon that could have used more of his mischievous spirit. Keaton was an ahead-of-his-time innovator, and though Bogdanovich honors that legacy he doesn’t always live up to it: You’ll leave the film knowing more about its subject than you did when you walked in, but there’s little here that feels like it couldn’t be found
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side Of The Wind’ Took Half A Century To Make Venice Debut: Watch Exclusive Trailer

Why Orson Welles’ ‘The Other Side Of The Wind’ Took Half A Century To Make Venice Debut: Watch Exclusive Trailer
Exclusive: The mission of the filmmaker should be “to preside over divine accidents,” Orson Welles once told me. Indeed, his career and lifestyle seemed designed to foster accidents, divine or otherwise.

A case in point was his final film, The Other Side of the Wind, which took 48 years to complete. It will finally unveil at the Venice Film Festival following a meticulous and painstaking process of re-editing and re-writing funded by Netflix. Accompanying it will be a Netflix documentary about Welles, titled They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead, which may or may not prove a valid prediction. (Wind will be released in select theaters and on Netflix November 2; check out the exclusive first-look trailer above.)

Going back to Citizen Kane (1941) and the Mercury Theater, the world of Welles was steeped in mythic conflict, confusion and strokes of genius, and the release of The Other Side of the Wind will reinforce this mythology.
See full article at Deadline »

Emmys Flashback: Cloris Leachman Had a Double Win and a Dress Mishap in 1975

Emmys Flashback: Cloris Leachman Had a Double Win and a Dress Mishap in 1975
Cloris Leachman has more awards than she knows what to do with. Among them: an Oscar for 1971's The Last Picture Show; a Golden Globe for her work on her Mary Tyler Moore Show spinoff, Phyllis; and eight Emmys — two of which she won at the 27th Emmy Awards, held at the Hollywood Palladium on May 19, 1975.

The first was for outstanding single performance by a supporting actress in a comedy or drama series, for "Phyllis Whips Inflation," a Mary Tyler Moore Show episode in which Leachman's character, a self-involved dermatologist's wife, discovers she has no marketable ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Lyon’s Lumière Festival Fetes Peter Bogdanovich

The 10th Lumière Festival this year will honor filmmaker, film historian and heritage film enthusiast Peter Bogdanovich, director of such classics as “The Last Picture Show” and “Paper Moon,” with a film showcase and celebration of his recent works.

The tribute will include the French premiere of his restored 1979 drama “Saint Jack” and the presentation of “The Great Buster,” his new documentary about Buster Keaton.

The festival, which runs Oct. 13-21 in Lyon, France, will also screen 1971’s “The Last Picture Show”; the 1971 documentary “Directed by John Ford” (which the director revised and re-edited for a 2006 version); 1972’s “What’s Up, Doc?” and “Paper Moon,” from 1973.

A major voice of the New Hollywood wave, Bogdanovich will also discuss his long career as part of a master class in Lyon. Also screening for the first time in France as part of the tribute will be Bill Teck’s 2014 documentary “One Day
See full article at Variety »

Peter Bogdanovich to Get Honor at Lyon's Lumiere Film Festival

Peter Bogdanovich to Get Honor at Lyon's Lumiere Film Festival
Peter Bogdanovich will light up Lyon later this year, with the Oscar nominee giving a master class and receiving a career honor at Cannes festival boss Thierry Fremaux’s Lumiere Film Festival.

The director of Paper Moon and The Last Picture Show will be honored at a ceremony on Oct. 17.

It will also kick off a handful of Bogdanovich-related events in France, with the festival premiering the restored version of 1979’s Saint Jack ahead of its theatrical release, as well as screen his new documentary The Great Buster about Buster Keaton, which will premiere in Venice.

Bill Teck’s 2014 documentary ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Ellen Burstyn, James Caan to Star in Romantic Comedy ‘Welcome to Pine Grove!’

  • Variety
Ellen Burstyn, James Caan to Star in Romantic Comedy ‘Welcome to Pine Grove!’
Ellen Burstyn and James Caan are starring in the romantic comedy “Welcome to Pine Grove!” with shooting expected to begin later this summer.

Astute Films is the production company. Producers are Harrison Powell, Dominique Telson, and Fred Bernstein. Executive producers are Rick Jackson and Claudine Marrotte.

Burstyn will play a widow who moves into the Pine Grove Senior Community and discovers it’s just like high school, full of cliques and flirtatious suitors. Caan plays the hot new guy at Pine Grove and Burstyn’s love interest.

Donald Martin wrote the screenplay based on a story by Powell, which was inspired by his grandmother’s own experience of moving into a retirement community.

“’Welcome to Pine Grove!’ is ‘Mean Girls’ meets ‘Golden Girls’ in a senior community,” said Powell. “We wanted to make a film that inspires others because it is never too late to make friends, to laugh, to dance,
See full article at Variety »

Gus Van Sant Remembers His Plan for ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ Including Offers to Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio

Gus Van Sant Remembers His Plan for ‘Brokeback Mountain,’ Including Offers to Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio
Ang Lee’s “Brokeback Mountain” is perfect just the way it is, but that doesn’t mean we can’t enjoy imagining what Gus Van Sant would have done with the project. The Oscar-winning auteur behind the New Queer Cinema classic “My Own Private Idaho” and the more-commercial “Good Will Hunting” has been offered many films throughout his career, including “Brokeback Mountain.” His latest film, “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” follows the life of eccentric Portland cartoonist John Callahan, played by his “To Die For” star Joaquin Phoenix.

It’s long been reported that both Van Sant and Pedro Almodóvar were initially approached to direct the groundbreaking”Brokeback,” but Van Sant recently told IndieWire why his vision ultimately wasn’t right — and which A-list actors turned down the film.

“Nobody wanted to do it,” Van Sant said. “I was working on it, and I felt
See full article at Indiewire »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Meryl Streep, Maggie Smith, Tatum O’Neal … ? [Poll]
Much like the Best Actress category, the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in the 1970s went to some true living legends. This decade included the youngest acting winner in history, the shortest performance to win an Oscar in history, and the start for a woman who would go on to become the all-time nomination leader. So which Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of the 1970s is your favorite? Look back on each and vote in our poll below.

Helen Hayes, “Airport” (1970)— Hayes won her second Oscar thanks to her role in “Airport” as Ada Quonsett, an older woman who makes a habit of being a stowaway on airplanes. She previously won an Oscar in Best Actress for “The Sin of Madelon Claudet” (1931). Hayes became the first woman to “Egot,” winning the grand slam of major awards: the Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony.

SEEJessica Lange (‘Tootsie’) named top Best Supporting Actress Oscar winner of 1980s,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Robert De Niro, Joel Grey, Christopher Walken … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Robert De Niro, Joel Grey, Christopher Walken … ? [Poll]
The 1970s provided many older actors with their first Oscars, particularly in Best Supporting Actor. The decade also included what remains the only instance of an actor winning back-to-back Oscars in a supporting category. So which Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of the 1970s do you like the best? Look back at each year’s winner and be sure to vote in the poll below!

John Mills, “Ryan’s Daughter” (1970) — Mills started the decade off with an Oscar win for playing the town fool Michael who uncovers a secret in “Ryan’s Daughter.” This was Mills’ only Oscar nomination and win, despite a very long career in film and television.

SEEJack Nicholson (‘Terms of Endearment’) blasts off after being voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Ben Johnson, “The Last Picture Show” (1971) — Johnson would win his Oscar for “The Last Picture Show” in which he plays Sam the Lion,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Glenda Jackson … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Actress Oscar winner of 1970s: Jane Fonda, Diane Keaton, Glenda Jackson … ? [Poll]
The 1970s was a decade of heavyweight actresses taking home Oscar glory. The decade’s Best Actress winners included multiple performers who would go on to win many awards, including more Oscars. So which Best Actress winner for the 1970s do you consider your favorite? Let’s recap all 10 winners and be sure to vote in our poll below.

Glenda Jackson, “Women in Love” (1970) — Jackson won her first Oscar for playing a demanding sculptress named Gudrun in the film “Women in Love.” This was Jackson’s first nomination and win, though as would become customary over the years, she did not attend the ceremony. She earned a nomination the following year for “Sunday Bloody Sunday.”

SEEMeryl Streep (‘Sophie’s Choice’) is clear choice for top Best Actress Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Jane Fonda, “Klute” (1971) — Fonda took home the first of two Oscars for “Klute,” in which she plays Bree Daniels,
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Incredibles 2’ and 33 Other Movie Sequels That Took Forever to Hit the Screen (Photos)

  • The Wrap
‘Incredibles 2’ and 33 Other Movie Sequels That Took Forever to Hit the Screen (Photos)
Long-gestating followups include blockbusters like “Jurassic World” and famous flops like “Blues Brothers 2000

George Miller took nearly 30 years to follow up “Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome” with the Tom Hardy-Charlize Theron thriller “Mad Max: Fury Road.”

The Odd Couple II” is among the sequels with the biggest gaps between films. Twenty-nine years after the 1968 original, Jack Lemmon returned as Felix Unger and Walter Matthau was Oscar Madison in their last film together.

Tron: Legacy” came 28 years after the original, and featured Jeff Bridges and Bruce Boxleitner. Shot in 3D, the film featured extensive visual effects and a score by Daft Punk. It grossed more than $400 million worldwide in 2010.

The Color of Money” featured Paul Newman reprising his role as “Fast Eddie” Felson alongside Tom Cruise. Newman won the Best Actor Oscar, 25 years after 1961’s “The Hustler.”

In “Psycho 2,” Meg Tilly played a traveler who encounters Norman Bates (Anthony Perkins
See full article at The Wrap »

Will acclaimed turn in ‘The Tale’ earn Ellen Burstyn her ninth Emmy Awards nomination?

Will acclaimed turn in ‘The Tale’ earn Ellen Burstyn her ninth Emmy Awards nomination?
With an Oscar, a Tony Award and two Emmy Awards on her mantle, Ellen Burstyn has, over the past half century, been a true awards season favorite. This year, with her turn in HBO’s “The Tale,” Burstyn is poised to add even more recognition to her resume.

The autobiographical film, written and directed by Jennifer Fox, earned rave reviews earlier this year at the Sundance Film Festival and is scheduled to premiere on HBO on May 26. “The Tale” follows Fox (portrayed by Laura Dern), a professor and documentary filmmaker whose life his rattled after her mother (Burstyn) discovers a story Fox wrote at age 13 about a relationship she had with her running coach (Jason Ritter) and horseback riding instructor (Elizabeth Debicki). The revelation forces Fox to dig deeper into her memories to uncover the truths she has been suppressing for so many years.

In his review, Matt Goldberg of Collider observed,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Giveaway – Win Breakheart Pass on Dual Format

Breakheart Pass, an exhilarating murder-mystery western starring Charles Bronson, is available now for the first time on Blu-ray in the UK, in a Dual Format (Blu-ray & DVD) edition, on Monday, May 21st, and we have three copies to give away. Read on for details of how to enter…

An action-packed mystery western based on the best-selling novel by Alistair MacLean, Breakheart Pass throws open the throttle for runaway excitement!

At the height of the frontier era, a locomotive races through the Rocky Mountains on a classified mission to a remote Army post. But one by one, the passengers are being murdered. Their only hope is John Deakin, a mysterious prisoner-in-transit who must fight for his life – and the lives of everyone on the train – as he uncovers a deadly secret that explodes in a torrent of shocking revelations, explosive brawls and blazing gun battles.

With a rousing score by Jerry Goldsmith
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Peter Bart: Fifty Years In, Three Directors Continue To Build Their Legacies

Peter Bart: Fifty Years In, Three Directors Continue To Build Their Legacies
As several excellent books and articles are reminding us, 1968 was a year of tumult. Regimes were collapsing on this date 50 years ago, protesters jammed the streets, and the worlds of music and film were being re-imagined. Even the tightly regimented Cannes Film Festival exploded in a noisy chaos of demonstrations.

The convulsions of five decades ago, to be sure, did not have the enduring impact that many had imagined. Game-changing ideas crashed and burned, taking promising careers down with them. Indeed, it became cool in the ’60s to carefully study the rituals of survival rather than the keys to success.

Given this realization, I decided to seek out three proud ’60s survivors who not only defied the fates but actually managed to build on the frenzy of the times: Francis Coppola, Billy Friedkin and Peter Bogdanovich. Their careers were just starting to burgeon in 1968. Today, they seem as passionate as
See full article at Deadline »

‘Mom’ star Allison Janney’s Oscar win for ‘I, Tonya’ proves that TV and film worlds continue to merge

‘Mom’ star Allison Janney’s Oscar win for ‘I, Tonya’ proves that TV and film worlds continue to merge
Earlier this month the star of a network television sitcom, Allison Janney, won an Oscar. In fact, she had to cut her appearances at post-Oscar parties short because she had to be at work on the CBS show “Mom” the next day. While this has happened before, Janney’s victory for “I Tonya” and the lack of media attention to a sitcom star winning a movie award just shows how the television and film worlds have merged to an extent that actors now move freely in between both venues.

See Oscar hosts gallery: Performers who have hosted the Academy Awards

Until fairly recently you were either a television actor or a film actor. You pretty much did one or the other. It was even common for young actors to stipulate that they would only audition for film. Some actors such as Bruce Willis were able to parlay their TV stardom into movie careers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!

When co-stars collide at Oscars: Does one win or do they split the vote? Sam Rockwell, pay attention!
It’s the dream of most actors and actresses to receive an Oscar nomination and, if they’re lucky, to win. But what happens when you’re up against a co-star from the same movie? Does one triumph or do they split the vote? Click through our photo gallery above of all the times this has happened throughout Academy Awards history.

Sam Rockwell and Woody Harrelson both scored Best Supporting Actor nominations for their work in “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri.” It has been 26 years since Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley were both nominated for “Bugsy” (1991). Unfortunately for the duo they split their support and Jack Palance won for “City Slickers,” ironically a former victim of vote-splitting against his “Shane” co-star Brandon De Wilde (they lost to Frank Sinatra, “From Here to Eternity”).

See 2018 Oscar Best Picture predictions by experts: ‘Three Billboards’ pulls into tie with ‘The Shape of Water’ as voting ends Feb.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best Supporting Actor Oscar champ to beat a co-star

Sam Rockwell (‘Three Billboards’) would be sixth Best Supporting Actor Oscar champ to beat a co-star
“Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” ended a 26-year drought in Best Supporting Actor, producing two nominees, Woody Harrelson and Sam Rockwell, from the same film for the first time since “Bugsy” (1991) stars Harvey Keitel and Ben Kingsley lost to Jack Palance (“City Slickers”). By all appearances, it’s smooth sailing for Rockwell for the win, which would be the sixth time a Best Supporting Actor winner defeated a co-star in 18 dual duels.

“Mr. Smith Goes to Washington” (1939) stars Harry Carey and Claude Rains were the first co-stars to be nominated against each other in Best Supporting Actor, but they lost to Thomas Mitchell for “Stagecoach.” It would be another 32 years — with seven pairs of double nominees in between — before a Best Supporting Actor champ, Ben Johnson, beat a co-star, Jeff Bridges, for 1971’s “The Last Picture Show.”

Three years later, Robert De Niro prevailed over fellow “The Godfather Part II
See full article at Gold Derby »

2018 Oscars trivia: 15 Fascinating facts, figures and milestones

2018 Oscars trivia: 15 Fascinating facts, figures and milestones
With his farewell film, three-time Oscar winner Daniel Day-Lewis could break the record for most wins by an actor while Meryl Streep, who just extended her nominations record with bid #21, could match the achievement of four-time winner Katharine Hepburn.

Below, we offer up 13 more facts, stats, and figures regarding this year’s Academy Awards nominees announced on Jan. 23. Winners of the 24 competitive races at the Oscars will be revealed on March 4 during a live telecast on ABC hosted by Jimmy Kimmel.

See 2018 Oscar nominations: Full list of Academy Awards nominees in all 24 categories

Lucky 13?

The Shape of Water” is the tenth film in Oscar history to earn 13 nominations. The current record of 14 nominations is held by three films, “All about Eve” (1951), “Titanic” (1998) and “La La Land” (2017)

Best Actor mainstay

With his sixth Best Actor Oscar nomination, Daniel Day-Lewis (“Phantom Thread”) is now tied with Richard Burton for recognition in the category.
See full article at Gold Derby »
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