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Hands of the Ripper (1971)

R | | Horror | 13 July 1972 (USA)
As a young child Jack the Ripper's daughter witnesses him kill her mother. As a young woman she carries on the murderous reign of her father. A psychiatrist tries to cure her with tragic consequences.

Director:

Peter Sasdy

Writers:

Lewis Davidson (screenplay) (as L.W. Davidson), Edward Spencer Shew (from an original story by)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Eric Porter ... Pritchard
Angharad Rees ... Anna
Jane Merrow ... Laura
Keith Bell ... Michael
Derek Godfrey Derek Godfrey ... Dysart
Dora Bryan ... Mrs Golding
Marjorie Rhodes Marjorie Rhodes ... Mrs Bryant
Lynda Baron Lynda Baron ... Long Liz
Marjie Lawrence ... Dolly
Norman Bird ... Police Inspector
Margaret Rawlings ... Madame Bullard
Elizabeth MacLennan Elizabeth MacLennan ... Mrs. Wilson
Barry Lowe Barry Lowe ... Mr Wilson
A.J. Brown A.J. Brown ... Rev Anderson
April Wilding April Wilding ... Catherine
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Storyline

The infant daughter of Jack the Ripper is witness to the brutal murder of her mother by her father. Fifteen years later she is a troubled young woman who is seemingly possessed by the spirit of her father. While in a trance she continues his murderous killing spree but has no recollection of the events afterwards. A sympathetic psychiatrist takes her in and is convinced he can cure her condition. Soon, however, he regrets his decision. Written by Kevin Steinhauer <K.Steinhauer@BoM.GOV.AU>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Hands of Jack the Ripper Live Again...As His Fiendish Daughter Kills Again...And Again...And Again... See more »

Genres:

Horror

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Lynda Baron's character is named after one of Jack the Ripper's real-life victims, Elizabeth Stride, whose nickname was "Long Liz". See more »

Goofs

Dr. Pritchard (Eric Porter) tells Dysart (Derek Godfrey) that he believes that Anna (Angharad Rees) may suffer from schizophrenia and that he wants to use Signmund Freud's psychoanalysis to treat her and later insists multiple times that he's sure he can "cure" Anna. However, Freud believed that psychoses like schizophrenia could not be treated by analysis because the patients were divorced from objective reality and did not recognize or acknowledge that they were ill. See more »

Quotes

Dysart: Damn it Pritchard you've got a possessed being in your home, as savage as any wild beast.
See more »

Alternate Versions

For an R rating in the US, the murders of Long Liz and the housemaid were trimmed, notably the second stab wound on the latter. See more »


Soundtracks

Agnus Dei (from 'Requiem')
(uncredited)
Written by Giuseppe Verdi
[heard during the climactic 'Whispering Gallery' scene]
See more »

User Reviews

 
Another excellent film from Hammer!
3 April 2005 | by The_VoidSee all my reviews

I'm a big fan of Hammer Horror; their inventive camp styling puts their output above the majority of other horror studios. Adding to that is the fact that when you watch a Hammer film, you know that you're in for a good time. While Hands of the Ripper isn't the best film to come out of the studio, it still represents another success for the studio and it's a film that will no doubt delight their fans. The great plot line follows the daughter of the infamous murderer; Jack the Ripper. After witnessing her father kill her mother, the young girl is permanently scarred and now, years later, her past is beginning to surface. The film finds a space between a psychological thriller and the familiar 'slasher' sub-genre (and it's yet another film in this style that pre-dates Halloween), and it blends brilliantly. The first thing you will notice about this movie is the way that the murders are done - stylishly, brutally and extremely camp! They're extremely over the top and a great treat for the horror fanatic.

Eric Porter stars as a psychiatrist who takes our heroine in after she murdered the woman who was looking after. Porter gives a fine performance as the good doctor, and keeps in with the style of the older leading male that Hammer have created. The film is noteworthy for it's excellent creation of the period in which the film is set, and that too adds to the delight of the film. One thing that I have noticed about Hammer's product as they entered the seventies is that the films lost that colourful camp edge that epitomised the earlier films and it had been replaced by a more European style. Captain Kronos is the prime example of that change, but luckily Hands of the Ripper is more like the Hammer films of yore. Not as colourful, but it still has that Hammer charm that us fans love so much. As usual, the film isn't quite perfect; it's dogged by a less than perfect script, and at times the psychological elements of the film ground down to walking pace, which makes the film boring; but generally this is a lovely piece of kitsch and Hammer fans won't be disappointed!


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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

13 July 1972 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Hands of the Ripper See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (RCA Sound Recording) (uncredited)

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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