The French Connection (1971) - News Poster

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Doc Corner: William Friedkin's 'The Devil and Father Amorth'

By Glenn Dunks

It’s becoming more common for directors known for fictional narrative cinema to work in the documentary medium as well. Not all of them land as successfully as, say, Ava DuVernay who managed a Best Documentary nomination at the Oscars as her first nod, despite previous critically acclaimed narrative features including even a Best Picture nominee. Documentary is, after all, just another form of building a narrative. There’s no real reason why telling a story in that form ought to be any different to building one around real people and real locations.

The Devil and Father Armoth, now in limited release and available on digital platforms, isn't William Friedkin's first documentary. He's made short docs like 2007’s The Painter’s Voice, 1985’s Putting it Together: The Making of the Broadway Album for Barbra Streisand, and the feature-length Conversations with Fritz Lang. That latter example, a 1975 film,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Philip D’Antoni, ‘French Connection’ Producer, Dies at 89

  • The Wrap
Philip D’Antoni, ‘French Connection’ Producer, Dies at 89
Philip D’Antoni, producer of the first R-Rated film to win the Oscar for Best Picture, “The French Connection,” died last week of kidney failure, according to his son-in-law, Mark Rathaus. He was 89.

D’Antoni made his name in the ’60s and ’70s as a producer of films with iconic car chases. In “French Connection,” New York detective Jimmy “Popeye” Doyle (Gene Hackman) chases down a subway train holding a wanted sniper with a stranger’s Pontiac. D’Antoni was also producer on the famous 1968 crime film “Bullitt,” which is known for a climactic car chase through the streets of San Francisco with Steve McQueen behind the wheel of a Ford Mustang.

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After those films, D’Antoni also served as producer on several more crime movies and TV shows, including ABC’s “Strike Force,” and the 1973 Roy Scheider film “The Seven-Ups,” the latter of which he also directed.

Like “Bullitt” and “French Connection,” “Seven-Ups” features a major car chase, with Bill Hickman getting chased by Scheider in a pursuit on the streets of New York in a pair of Pontiacs. In all three films, Hickman was involved as a stunt driver in the chase sequences.

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New Hollywood filmmaker William Friedkin, who directed “The French Connection,” honored his friend and collaborator on Twitter.

Phil D’Antoni. My friend and the great producer

Of The French Connection has died. May he Rest

In peace

– William Friedkin (@WilliamFriedkin) April 23, 2018

D’Antoni is survived by his wife, five children, and nine grandchildren.

Read original story Philip D’Antoni, ‘French Connection’ Producer, Dies at 89 At TheWrap
See full article at The Wrap »

Philip D'Antoni, Oscar-Winning Producer on 'The French Connection,' Dies at 89

Philip D'Antoni, who won an Academy Award for his work on The French Connection and produced two other crime thrillers also renowned for their amazing car-chase sequences, has died. He was 89.

D'Antoni died April 15 of complications from kidney failure at his home in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, his son-in-law Mark Rathaus told The Hollywood Reporter.

D'Antoni also produced the Steve McQueen classic Bullitt (1968), famous for its 11-minute car chase in and around San Francisco, and he produced — and directed — The Seven-Ups (1973), which featured a NYPD cop (French Connection actor Roy Scheider) in hot pursuit of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

Philip D'Antoni, Oscar-Winning Producer on 'The French Connection,' Dies at 89

Philip D'Antoni, Oscar-Winning Producer on 'The French Connection,' Dies at 89
Philip D'Antoni, who won an Academy Award for his work on The French Connection and produced two other crime thrillers also renowned for their amazing car-chase sequences, has died. He was 89.

D'Antoni died April 15 of complications from kidney failure at his home in Hastings-on-Hudson, New York, his son-in-law Mark Rathaus told The Hollywood Reporter.

D'Antoni also produced the Steve McQueen classic Bullitt (1968), famous for its 11-minute car chase in and around San Francisco, and he produced — and directed — The Seven-Ups (1973), which featured a NYPD cop (French Connection actor Roy Scheider) in hot pursuit of...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Philip D’Antoni, ‘The French Connection’ Producer, Dies at 89

Philip D’Antoni, ‘The French Connection’ Producer, Dies at 89
Philip D’Antoni, who produced Oscar-winning films like “The French Connection” and “Bullitt,” died at age 89 on April 15. The producer died at his home in New York.

D’Antoni was best known for the 1971 crime drama “The French Connection,” which won three Golden Globes and five Oscars, including best picture. Gene Hackman won for best actor and William Friedkin for best director and the film also won best adapted screenplay and best film editing. Also on the late producer’s resume is the Steve McQueen action flick “Bullitt,” which won an Oscar for film editing.

TV documentaries like “Elizabeth Taylor in London,” “Sophia Loren in Rome,” and the “Proud Land” miniseries made up much of D’Antoni’s early work in Hollywood in the early 1960s. “Bullitt” marked his first feature film producing credit in 1968, and from there he went on to produce “The French Connection” before returning to TV later in life.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘The Devil And Father Amorth’ Continues William Friedkin’s Obsession With Evil [Review]

One question looms evocatively over the 69 minutes consuming “The Devil and Father Amorth,” Academy Award-winning director William Friedkin‘s (“The French Connection”) latest documentary about real-life exorcisms: “is this really the random invasion of an external force?” A question that has perpetuated the widening of the gap between science and religion, the Vatican’s performance of exorcisms continues to be subject to scrutiny by both non-believers and even those who proclaim belief in Christ.
See full article at The Playlist »

“Success Is More Disorienting Than Failure”: Guillermo del Toro & William Friedkin Talk Their Oscar Experiences & More

Dislike the competitive sports nature of awards season and the Oscars? This podcast is probably for you. On the most recent episode of the excellent Talk House podcast, cinema titans (and old friends judging by the rapport of the chat) William Friedkin and recent Best Director and Best Picture winner Guillermo del Toro sat down to talk about many things, but thematically, their discussion centered around the seduction of success and getting lost in accolades and awards.
See full article at The Playlist »

'The Devil & Father Amorth': Film Review

'The Devil & Father Amorth': Film Review
Having followed his 1971 masterpiece The French Connection with a second worldwide hit, The Exorcist, in 1973, William Friedkin has perennially returned to that demonic-pea-soup fountain. There was a 1979 theatrical rerelease, cropped to suit 70mm, then a tweaked version with new footage for TV in the '80s. We also got a theatrical "Version You've Never Seen" in 2000, in time to ride the DVD reissue wave; somewhere in there, Friedkin and the book's author, William Peter Blatty, briefly tried to make The Exorcist III together.

Now Friedkin cuts out the fictional middleman, traveling to Italy to film a real-life...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Playback: Lynne Ramsay on ‘You Were Never Really Here’ and Economy in Storytelling

Playback: Lynne Ramsay on ‘You Were Never Really Here’ and Economy in Storytelling
Welcome to “Playback,” a Variety / iHeartRadio podcast bringing you exclusive conversations with the talents behind many of today’s hottest films.

Filmmaker Lynne Ramsay has made a steady career of stripped-down narratives, showcasing lean visual storytelling kissed by the influences of Ingmar Bergman, Nicolas Roeg and David Lynch. Her latest film, “You Were Never Really Here,” finds Ramsay forging ahead five years after she walked off the production of western “Jane Got a Gun” amid a dispute with the film’s producers. Based on a book by author Jonathan Ames, she was drawn to how tight the story was, and the cinematic ideas it conjured.

Listen to this week’s episode of “Playback” below. New episodes air every Thursday.

Click here for more episodes of “Playback.”

“It was quite a short book, which I found really interesting, in a way,” Ramsay says. “It’s unlike ‘Kevin,’ which was a huge
See full article at Variety - Film News »

The Seven-Ups

Forget All Singing! – All Dancing! Tonight’s bill of fare is wall-to-wall high grade crime action. Roy Scheider leads a great cast in an all-New Yawk tale of gangsters, kidnapping and betrayal. The police tactics of Scheider’s special felony crime squad would today land them all in jail, but they’re all stand-up guys. And buckle up for one of the best, most realistic pre-cgi auto chase scenes ever filmed.

The Seven-Ups

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date March 20, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Roy Scheider, Tony Lo Bianco, Victor Arnold, Jerry Leon, Ken Kercheval, Larry Haines, Richard Lynch, Bill Hickman, Joe Spinell.

Cinematography: Urs Furrer

Film Editors: Jerry Greenberg, John C. Horger, Stephen A. Rotter

Stunt Coordinator: Bill Hickman

Original Music: Don Ellis

Written by Sonny Grosso, Alexander Jacobs, Albert Ruben

Produced by Philip D’Antoni, Kenneth Utt, Barry J. Weitz

Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Where do the most recent group of Academy Award winners rank all time?

As we begin to fully focus on 2018 releases and eventually what the 2019 awards season will be like, a little more about the most recent Oscars is still required. Mainly, a look at how the winners stack up with previous ones. This time around, I’m tying in all of the major categories together. Yes, all eight of the top prizes will get a rundown today, with the possibility of another piece next week on the technical categories. For now, it’s Picture, Director, the four Acting slots, and both Screenplay categories, which is more than enough to start with. This is going to be fun. Like I mentioned above, before we get to Best Picture, which is clearly the big one, quickly I’d like to run down some of the other categories and how they stack up. That way, it’s more of a broader collection. Obviously, we know
See full article at Hollywoodnews.com »

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland

Honorary Oscars: A look back at 90 years, from Charlie Chaplin to Bob Hope to Donald Sutherland
Over the decades, special or honorary Oscars have gone to everything from a film series to animated shorts to innovators to a ventriloquist to child performers to foreign films. Tour our photo galleries for a look back featuring every performer honored (above) and every non-performer honored (below).

Two special awards were handed out at the first Academy Awards on May 16, 1929:

Charlie Chaplin, who had originally been nominated for lead actor and for comedy direction for his 1928 masterpiece “The Circus,” was withdrawn from those nominations when the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences’ Board of Governors gave him a special award for his “versatility in writing, acting, directing and producing” the comedy.

Warner Brothers also picked up a special honorary for producing 1927’s “The Jazz Singer”-“the pioneer outstanding talking picture, which has revolutionized the industry”.

Now called honorary Oscars, Donald Sutherland, cinematographer Owen Roizman (“The French Connection,” “The Exorcist
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Black Panther’: Oscar-Nominated Rachel Morrison Shot the Most Significant Marvel Movie Since ‘Iron Man’

  • Indiewire
‘Black Panther’: Oscar-Nominated Rachel Morrison Shot the Most Significant Marvel Movie Since ‘Iron Man’
Rachel Morrison is now basking in her historic, breakout moment. She earned the first Oscar nomination for a female cinematographer for the poetic beauty of “Mudbound,” and now has shot the opulent-looking “Black Panther,” starring Chadwick Boseman as the first African-American superhero. It’s the most significant Marvel movie since “Iron Man,” and could have impact on Morrison’s Oscar run.

But, in reuniting with director Ryan Coogler (following their fruitful collaboration on “Fruitvale Station”), Morrison proved that her craft is more about versatility than gender. They’ve graced the McU with an essential political consciousness and warmth to go along with smart spy fun and requisite superhero action.

“For me, the best part was spending time again with Ryan,” Morrison said. “Our approach was to really find a way to ground it, to make it of this world even though there are elements that were [fantastical]. But, unlike other Marvel films,
See full article at Indiewire »

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race

Innovative Genre Movies Goose This Year’s Oscar Race
Will this be one of those rare years when Oscar shows the lowly “genre” film a little love?

Undoubtedly, if only because so many of this year’s best-picture contenders come wrapped in indie-film credibility and are layered with contemporary sensibilities that elevate the films beyond the “genre” label.

Consider “Get Out,” which combines two particularly Oscar-averse genres — horror and comedy. Writer-director Jordan Peele blended them into an awards juggernaut that dives headfirst into one of the biggest hot-button issues of the day: race.

Before we go further, let’s define our terms: While the French word “genre” refers to a way of classifying or categorizing artistic works, the term “genre film” usually stands as a pejorative when thrown around by snobby critics while referring to Westerns, sci-fi films, sports tales, war stories and a few other categories. It’s a way of dismissing a film (“It’s a genre film”) — a fancier way of saying, “Well
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1990s: Robin Williams, Cuba Gooding Jr, Joe Pesci … ? [Poll]
The Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in the 1990s went to many long overdue veterans of the industry. Actors like James Coburn, Jack Palance and Martin Landau finally earned Oscars in this decade, alongside then-newer stars like Cuba Gooding Jr and Kevin Spacey. What is your favorite Best Supporting Actor performance of the 1990s?

Read through a recap of their performances and vote in our poll below. (See 2018 Oscar predictions for Best Supporting Actor.)

Joe Pesci, “Goodfellas” (1990) — Joe Pesci won his Oscar with the most iconic role of his career. In “Goodfellas” Pesci plays Tommy DeVito, a blustering gangster who provides some of the funniest lines in the film. Pesci was previously nominated in Best Supporting Actor for “Raging Bull” (1980).

SEEWho’s your favorite Best Director Oscar winner of the 1990s: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Jonathan Demme … ? [Poll]

Jack Palance, “City Slickers” (1991) — Jack Palance finally won his Oscar thanks to “City Slickers,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Film Review: ‘Den of Thieves’

Film Review: ‘Den of Thieves’
Ambition isn’t a bad quality to see in a January movie. The simplest thing to call “Den of Thieves” would be a heist thriller, but it’s a relatively elaborate one, an underworld action drama that sprawls and digresses and for a while, at least, appears to have something on its mind. The movie is set in Los Angeles, which it presents as the bank-robbery capital of the Western world, and the director, Christian Gudegast, shoots the city’s endless freeway maze with a synth-pop moodiness that’s flagrantly evocative of Michael Mann.

As it turns out, the existential drive-by atmosphere of “Den of Thieves” isn’t even the most Mann-ish thing about it. The film coasts along on parallel narrative tracks, zeroing in on a team of renegade cops, led by Gerard Butler as a sensitive bruiser, as well as a crew of robbers who are planning to break into the L.A. branch
See full article at Variety - Film News »

William Friedkin’s Exorcism Documentary ‘The Devil and Father Amorth’ Acquired by Orchard

The Orchard has acquired worldwide rights to William Friedkin’s exorcism documentary “The Devil and Father Amorth” from Ld Entertainment.

The documentary explores an exorcism performed in 2016 by the Vatican’s Father Gabriele Amorth as he fights to expel Satan from an Italian woman. Produced by Mickey Liddell and Pete Shilaimon, the Orchard plans a theatrical release on April 20, followed by a worldwide digital release.

Friedkin was nominated for an Academy Award for directing the 1973 film “The Exorcist.” He had won the Oscar in 1971 for directing “The French Connection.”

“In the early 1970s when I directed ‘The Exorcist,’ I had not witnessed an exorcism but I wondered how close I had come to portraying reality,” Friedkin said. “I had been curious to meet Father Amorth for many years and when he granted permission to meet and film him in Rome last May, it was the opportunity to complete the circle and see how close that film came
See full article at Variety - Film News »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “The French Connection”

The notorious Popeye Doyle was made famous by this film that features two cops that are onto something when they suspect a drug deal about to go down in their town and almost bust it up. The dealers get away and even taunt the cops, making it a personal matter as Doyle and his partner, Cloudy, make it their personal mission to hunt down the drug dealers and catch them in the act. When the time finally does come for the bust to go down the cops manage to nab several of the criminals, but the one that Doyle wanted

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “The French Connection
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Why Todd Haynes and Ed Lachman Are the Most Important Collaboration in Cinema

It is sometimes hard to remember how young a medium moving pictures are compared to other art forms. When taking into account how films incorporate sound, music, movement, color, composition, design, visual effects, acting and narrative, the possibilities can seem overwhelming. Yet we live in a time when too often the films that fill our theaters feel derivative.

“Godard once said to me, ‘you know why all films look alike?’” said cinematographer Ed Lachman in an interview with IndieWire. “He said, ‘Because they have a 1000 foot magazine [the light-tight chamber that holds film stock]. If they were only a 100 foot magazine, films would look different.’ I understand what he was saying. The means that we have today in the digital world we can shoot forever, that’s going to change how we use our shots.”

How the filmmaking tools of different eras shaped those movies is something Lachman and director Todd Haynes study and research like historians
See full article at Indiewire »

Movie Marathon: From Friedkin to Mann, via William Petersen and Tangerine Dream

Tom Jolliffe looks back at four must see cult classics…

Whilst perusing a few episodes of Mark Kermode Uncut I stumbled upon an episode focused on a film I’d been meaning to see for a fair while. Firstly, it was directed by William Friedkin, a cinematic great. Secondly the film is scored by Tangerine Dream. Both those aspects made Sorcerer a film forever on my watch-list. It wasn’t until seeing a ringing endorsement from Kermode however that I was compelled to shift it ahead in the queue.

This then kickstarted a marathon of films with connective strands. I will tell you exactly why each film was chosen (as far as the Michael Mann portion the two are long term favourites of mine) and indeed the resultant viewing experience. The films I watched were Sorcerer and To Live And Die In L.A. by Friedkin followed by Thief and Manhunter from Michael Mann.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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