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Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

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In prerevolutionary Russia, a Jewish peasant contends with marrying off three of his daughters while growing anti-Semitic sentiment threatens his village.

Director:

Norman Jewison

Writers:

Sholom Aleichem (adapted from stories) (as Sholem Aleichem), Arnold Perl (adapted from Sholem Aleichem stories by special arrangement with) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
1,824 ( 881)
Won 3 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 13 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Topol ... Tevye
Norma Crane ... Golde
Leonard Frey ... Motel
Molly Picon ... Yente
Paul Mann Paul Mann ... Lazar Wolf
Rosalind Harris ... Tzeitel
Michele Marsh ... Hodel
Neva Small Neva Small ... Chava
Paul Michael Glaser ... Perchik (as Michael Glaser)
Ray Lovelock ... Fyedka (as Raymond Lovelock)
Elaine Edwards Elaine Edwards ... Shprintze
Candy Bonstein Candy Bonstein ... Bielke
Shimen Ruskin Shimen Ruskin ... Mordcha
Zvee Scooler Zvee Scooler ... Rabbi
Louis Zorich ... Constable
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Storyline

At the beginning of the twentieth century, Jews and Orthodox Christians live in the little village of Anatevka in the pre-revolutionary Russia of the Czars. Among the traditions of the Jewish community, the matchmaker arranges the match and the father approves it. The milkman Reb Tevye is a poor man that has been married for twenty-five years with Golde and they have five daughters. When the local matchmaker Yente arranges the match between his older daughter Tzeitel and the old widow butcher Lazar Wolf, Tevye agrees with the wedding. However Tzeitel is in love with the poor tailor Motel Kamzoil and they ask permission to Tevye to get married that he accepts to please his daughter. Then his second daughter Hodel (Michele Marsh) and the revolutionary student Perchik decide to marry each other and Tevye is forced to accept. When Perchik is arrested by the Czar troops and sent to Siberia, Hodel decides to leave her family and homeland and travel to Siberia to be with her beloved Perchik.... Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

To Life! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

MGM

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Hebrew | Russian

Release Date:

3 November 1971 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

El violinista en el tejado See more »

Filming Locations:

Gorica, Croatia See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$9,000,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$80,500,000
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System) (70 mm prints)| Mono (35 mm prints)| Stereo (35 mm mag-optical prints)

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Before production Norma Crane was diagnosed with breast cancer, which would eventually kill her. She told only director Norman Jewison, co-star Topol and associate producer Patrick J. Palmer, all of whom kept her secret. See more »

Goofs

Near the end of the dancing scene in Mordcha's inn, we see the Jews holding hands and dancing to one side, and the Russians walking ducked through the spaces between their bodies to the other side. In the first two takes, we see four Russians, and in the following two takes only three, the one on the right, with brown hair and a blue shirt, is gone. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Tevye: A fiddler on the roof. Sounds crazy, no? But here, in our little village of Anatevka, you might say every one of us is a fiddler on the roof trying to scratch out a pleasant, simple tune without breaking his neck. It isn't easy. You may ask 'Why do we stay up there if it's so dangerous?' Well, we stay because Anatevka is our home. And how do we keep our balance? That I can tell you in one word: tradition!
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Crazy Credits

Topol and the cast sing "Tradition" without any opening credits rolling. At the end of the number, the fiddler, standing on the left of the screen, launches into an extensive solo while the opening credits roll on the right of the screen. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Nostalgia Critic: Santa Claus: The Movie (2012) See more »

Soundtracks

Far From the Home I Love
(1964) (uncredited)
Music by Jerry Bock
Lyrics by Sheldon Harnick
Performed by Michele Marsh
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Cultural Divide
24 June 2009 | by bkoganbingSee all my reviews

Watching Fiddler On The Roof I couldn't help but think that way back when he was a student, Sholem Aleichem must have gotten a Russian translation of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. It must have influenced him so that I can't believe it was a coincidence that when he created the story of Tevye the Milkman he had five daughters and he was just looking to get them off his hands just like Mr. Bennett was with his five.

Of course the difference between Czarist Russia for Jews and being part of the landed gentry in early Victorian England is cultural light years. Still fathers, mothers, daughters and prospective sons-in-law are the same wherever you go.

Filling some very big shoes in the lead was Topol who to this day is still appearing in stage productions of Fiddler On The Roof. But in 1971 people still remembered Zero Mostel on Broadway. Mostel was no longer in it, but Fiddler On The Roof was coming to the end of its then record run of 3242 performances. Topol had done the London production though so he was no novice in the part.

Topol justified Norman Jewison's faith in him by garnering an Academy Award nomination for Best Actor. Leonard Frey who was Motel the tailor who was the only one from the original Broadway cast and not in the role he did on Broadway got a nomination for Best Supporting Actor. In fact I liked him best in the film, a Yiddish version of Willie Mossop, the worm that turned from another English source, Hobson's Choice.

The cultural divide is the thing about Fiddler On The Roof that does separate it from a Victorian novel to a story of a perennially persecuted people. The thing that got me was the people's utter resignation to their fate come what may. Paul Michael Glaser, later Starsky on Starsky&Hutch, is the only one who's mad as hell and not taking it any more. For his pains he winds up in Siberia. Many have wondered why the Jews just marched off to the concentration camps two generations later. The answer in many ways is to be found in the characters Sholem Aleichem created from what he observed during his life.

Norman Jewison as a director filled the screen with this stage production. Small wonder among the Oscars that Fiddler On The Roof did win was for cinematography. The film also won for sound and best adapted musical score. The original songs were done by the Broadway team of Jerry Bock and Sheldon Harnick. Bock in writing the music had as keen an ear for the folk music of the culture as Richard Rodgers did in writing an Oriental score for The King And I.

If the role of Yente the matchmaker, a name as well as an occupation in Jewish tradition, wasn't in the original play, they'd have to have invented something to get Molly Picon in the film. The movie going public might only know her from such mainstream films like Come Blow Your Horn, but this woman who started as a child entertaining newly arrived folks from places like Anatevka became the First Lady of the Yiddish Theater. It wouldn't have been right to do Sholem Aleichem on the big screen without her in the film in some way.

Fiddler On The Roof is one of the best adapted Broadway musicals to the big screen ever done. And this review is dedicated to my late grandfather Isidore Kogan who came from Kamenets-Podolsk, a place just like Anatevka and settled here along with eight brothers and sisters in a watch repair business. I never knew Isidore, he died a week before I made my earthly debut, but he would have so loved Fiddler On The Roof.


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