Equinox (1970) - News Poster

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Drive-In Dust Offs: Equinox (1970)

The world of cinema has always been filled with dreamers, and a lot of those dreamers start out with nothing more than a Super 8 or 16mm camera, all the way up to the latest iPhones; little backyard excursions with friends and sisters or parents to fill out the cast for a monster on the loose or a super sleuth flick. Every once in a while there’s genuine talent to back up the enthusiasm; our Raimi’s and Coscarelli’s bear this out. But before them a group of enthusiastic teens actually had their vision realized, and eventually a mutated form of it invaded drive-ins as Equinox (1970), an inspirational and energetic full blown monster mash.

Released in October, Equinox began as a project in the mid ‘60s for creature kids Dennis Muren, David Allen and Mark McGee, combining their love of Famous Monsters of Filmland and Ray Harryhausen’s mesmerizing
See full article at DailyDead »

"The Sinbad Trilogy"- 6 Disc Blu-ray/DVD Limited Edition Set From Indicator

  • CinemaRetro
A Mixed Bag In A Big Box

By Darren Allison

‘I was there; I was in that picture, fighting the Cyclops on the beach, running from the dragon! I was enthralled. It's one of my strongest childhood memories.’ It’s very hard to argue with director John Landis’s vivid account of his earliest memories and the fantasy films of Ray Harryhausen and producer Charles H. Schneer. They seemed to touch us all in an indelible manner and took us into a fantasy realm far beyond our imagination. Indicator has (for the first time in the UK) combined the three Sinbad adventures in one very handsomely produced package. It’s a magical box that has very little trouble in sending us on a journey, and back to a place called innocence…

The Seventh voyage of Sinbad (1958) was something of a revelation back in its day. Ray Harryhausen’s pioneering stop-motion
See full article at CinemaRetro »

All of the Films Joining Filmstruck’s Criterion Channel This April

Each month, the fine folks at FilmStruck and the Criterion Collection spend countless hours crafting their channels to highlight the many different types of films that they have in their streaming library. This April will feature an exciting assortment of films, as noted below.

To sign up for a free two-week trial here.

Monday, April 3 The Chaos of Cool: A Tribute to Seijun Suzuki

In February, cinema lost an icon of excess, Seijun Suzuki, the Japanese master who took the art of the B movie to sublime new heights with his deliriously inventive approach to narrative and visual style. This series showcases seven of the New Wave renegade’s works from his career breakthrough in the sixties: Take Aim at the Police Van (1960), an off-kilter whodunit; Youth of the Beast (1963), an explosive yakuza thriller; Gate of Flesh (1964), a pulpy social critique; Story of a Prostitute (1965), a tragic romance; Tokyo Drifter
See full article at CriterionCast »

Jack Harris, Producer of ‘The Blob,’ Dies at 98

Jack Harris, Producer of ‘The Blob,’ Dies at 98
Jack H. Harris, producer of films including the 1958 horror film “The Blob” and “The Eyes of Laura Mars,” died of natural causes Tuesday in Beverly Hills. He was 98.

Harris was born in Philadelphia and performed in vaudeville as a child with the Cliff Edwards Kiddie Revue. After serving in the army during WWII, he worked in publicity and distribution before becoming a producer.

Before “The Blob,” Harris acquired the rights to “Jamboree” from the Boy Scouts of America, travelling the country to promote the film. During the trip, Harris and a Boy Scout exec spent hours discussing the ingredients necessary for a successful film and hatching a plan for a horror film.

He collaborated with Valley Forge, a Pennsylvania religious film studio, to make “The Blob,” and cast a little-known 27-year old Steve McQueen in the role of a town teenager who fights the red blob of muck. Methodist minister Irving S.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Happy Birthday Ray Harryhausen – Here are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

Special effects legend Ray Harryhausen, whose dazzling and innovative visual effects work on fantasy adventure films such as Jason And The Argonauts and The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad passed away in 2013 at age 92. In 1933, the then-13-year-old Ray Harryhausen saw King Kong at a Hollywood theater and was inspired – not only by Kong, who was clearly not just a man in a gorilla suit, but also by the dinosaurs. He came out of the theatre “stunned and haunted. They looked absolutely lifelike … I wanted to know how it was done.” It was done by using stop-motion animation: jointed models filmed one frame at a time to simulate movement. Harryhausen was to become the prime exponent of the technique and its combination with live action. The influence of Harryhausen on film luminaries like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Peter Jackson, and
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan

Release the Kraken! They're only now releasing this Blu-ray in the U.S.. The patron saint of every special effect fan gets the royal treatment in this career overview capped with industry testimonials and rare film items from a cache of 35mm outtakes found packed away in Rh's storeroom. Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Region B Blu-ray Arrow Video Us 2011 / Color / 1:78 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date June 28, 2016 / 19.95 Starring Ray Harryhausen, Peter Jackson, Nick Park, Phil Tippet, Randy Cook, Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, Tony Dalton, Dennis Muren, John Landis, Ray Bradbury, Ken Ralston, Martine Beswick, Vanessa Harryhausen, Caroline Munro, Guillermo del Toro, Joe Dante, John Lasseter, James Cameron, Steven Spielberg, Henry Selick. Original Music Alexandre Poncet Produced by Tony Dalton, Alexandre Poncet Written and Directed by Gilles Penso

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The time has long passed that Ray Harryhausen was merely a cult figure. By the release of Golden Voyage
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Corman Ahead of Hitchcock: Cult Nature vs. Humankind Sci-Fi Thriller

'The Beast with a Million Eyes': Hardly truth in advertising as there's no million-eyed beast in Roger Corman's micro-budget sci-fi thriller. 'The Beast with a Million Eyes': Alien invasion movie predates Alfred Hitchcock classic Despite the confusing voice-over introduction, David Kramarsky's[1] The Beast with a Million Eyes a.k.a. The Beast with 1,000,000 Eyes is one of my favorite 1950s alien invasion films. Set in an ugly, desolate landscape – shot “for wide screen in terror-scope” in Indio and California's Coachella Valley – the screenplay by future novelist Tom Filer (who also played Jack Nicholson's sidekick in the 1966 Western Ride in the Whirlwind) focuses on a dysfunctional family whose members become the first victims of a strange force from another galaxy after a spaceship lands nearby emitting sound vibrations that turn domestic animals into aggressive killers. Killer cow First, the lady-of-the-house is pecked by a flock of chickens and,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Horror Highlights: Exclusive Short Film For My Facebook, Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Restoration

As a special exclusive for Daily Dead readers, we have Carl Kelsch’s new short film, For My Facebook, available to watch now. Also in today’s Horror Highlights: Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan Blu-ray / DVD release details, info on Europe’s 4K Uhd Blu-ray release of The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, and a Q&A with Restoration director/co-writer/co-star Zack Ward.

Exclusive: Watch the Short Film For My Facebook: Press Release: “It all started with a funny image that popped in writer/director Carl Kelsch’s head: a play on words that yielded the final shots of ‘For My Facebook’ (To say more would spoil the ending). With only a few directing credits under his belt, he recruited jack-of-all-horror-trades Louie Cortes (Dir. of Attack of the Brain People, writer of Blood Slaughter Massacre) to do Sound. Kelsch, who also operated the camera, got input from Cortes on blocking and framing.
See full article at DailyDead »

Randall William Cook: As Never Seen Before, ‘New’ Vintage Stop-Motion on Blu-ray

In honor of Halloween, I once again have a special essay-article up, and this time I can name the contributor. Randall William Cook rates special celebrity status around DVD Savant despite being a friend from way, way back. I hope he's writing a book about his career, because his Hollywood experiences range far afield, from UCLA film school, to acting and directing film and TV, to doing special make-ups, animation direction, front-rank stop motion direction, and second unit direction on big features. Heavily into digital work since the 1990s, Randy supervised character animation and sequence direction for the three Lord of the Rings movies, netting him an amazing three Oscars, three years straight. And he's still the same guy from college -- a new Harryhausen or Welles disc comes out, and he wants to know all about it. Oh, and Cook is a fine writer as well -- as I think this thoughtful piece shows.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

100 years of animated characters in live-action films

From 1914 to Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes in the present, Ryan charts the evolution of animated characters in live-action film...

Feature

Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes and this year's Dawn Of The Planet Of The Apes chart the ascendance of a new, genetically-modified species of intelligent ape. Yet behind the scenes, these films also show us the technical evolution of digital effects, and how seamlessly live-action and computer-generated characters can be blended.

Where 20th Century Fox's earlier Planet Of The Apes films, beginning in 1968, used actors and prosthetic effects to bring their talking simians to life, Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes used the latest developments in performance capture to create some extraordinarily realistic characters. With its story told largely from the perspective of a genetically-modified chimpanzee named Caesar, Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes' success hinged on the quality of its effects
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Blob’ Director Jack L. Harris Gets His Walk of Fame Close-up

‘Blob’ Director Jack L. Harris Gets His Walk of Fame Close-up
Back in the early ’70s, a 21-year-old came to producer Jack L. Harris with his first feature film, made in 12 days. The novice director had worked on more than 70 movies but this was his own and he put his life savings, plus a borrowed $30,000, into it. Harris screened the film and liked it. But at 87 minutes, he deemed it too short and offered some story ideas. With $10,000 from Harris, an additional day’s shooting and three new scenes added, Harris had a new property to shop: John Landis’ “Schlock.”

“Jack’s a classic Hollywood type and one of the great movie mavericks,” Landis says of Harris, who’s being honored Feb. 4 with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. “He put ‘Schlock’ out but it wasn’t until years later that I learned how much money it made.

“I was in Italy, showing ‘Animal House,’ when they told me
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Top Ten Tuesday – The Best of Ray Harryhausen

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

Special effects legend Ray Harryhausen, whose dazzling and innovative visual effects work on fantasy adventure films such as Jason And The Argonauts and The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad passed away last month at age 92. In 1933, the then-13-year-old Ray Harryhausen saw King Kong at a Hollywood theater and was inspired – not only by Kong, who was clearly not just a man in a gorilla suit, but also by the dinosaurs. He came out of the theatre “stunned and haunted. They looked absolutely lifelike … I wanted to know how it was done.” It was done by using stop-motion animation: jointed models filmed one frame at a time to simulate movement. Harryhausen was to become the prime exponent of the technique and its combination with live action. The influence of Harryhausen on film luminaries like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Peter Jackson,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Remembering Ray Harryhausen

  • HeyUGuys
It might seem strange to outsiders that the death of a 92-year-old former visual-effects man for B-movies should attract so much media coverage. But to begin to comprehend the impact that Raymond ‘Ray’ Harryhausen has had on the movie industry you only have to look at the names of those directors who claim him as their inspiration: Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton, Terry Gilliam, George Lucas, Guillermo Del Toro, and then there’s the special effects gurus like Stan Winston, Dennis Muren, Rick Baker and Rob Bottin.

What’s even more incredible, considering the profound influence that Harryhausen had on the generations of filmmakers that came after him, is that he only ever made 16 feature films. Yet all of them (okay, with the possible exception of The Animal World) are regarded as classics, not only of the fantasy genre with which he is associated, but in their own right.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Ray Harryhausen, 1920-2013

  • Comicmix
He brought out dreams to life.

Raymond “Ray” Harryhausen (June 29, 1920 – May 7, 2013) died today at age 92, leaving behind a legacy of pioneering special effects work and a filmography that has deeply influenced writers, artists, and filmmakers for generations.

Dubbed by Starlog as “The Man Who Work Miracles”, he was one of the most influential movie makers who was himself inspired by Willis O’Brien’s stop-motion animation in King Kong. He took O’Brien’s efforts and improved upon them, branding it as Dynamation.

Although he resided in England for the majority of his adult life, Harryhausen was born in Los Angeles. King Kong was the spark that set him on a course towards a career in film, meticulously creating miniatures that could be photographed a few frames at a time followed by the tiniest of movements, followed by more frames, until the model appeared to move across the screen. This
See full article at Comicmix »

Special F/X Pioneer Ray Harryhausen Dies At 92

Special F/X Pioneer Ray Harryhausen Dies At 92
Special f/x legend and stop-motion animation pioneer Ray Harryhausen died Tuesday morning in London. He was 92.

Decades before the digital vfx revolution, Harryhausen was creating f/x-driven stories that influenced generations of filmmakers and f/x artists, including Peter Jackson, Tim Burton, Steven Spielberg, James Cameron, George Lucas, makeup maestro Rick Baker and Pixar guru John Lasseter, who paid tribute to him in “Monsters, Inc.” with an Easter egg shout-out.

“Without Ray Harryhausen, there would likely have been no ‘Star Wars’,” said George Lucas on Tuesday.

“His patience, his endurance have inspired so many of us,” said Peter Jackson.

Joe Letteri said, “Watching Ray Harryhausen’s films growing up was a pure joy. He brought legends to life and he became a legend himself. And I am sure that future generations of animators will continue to look to him for inspiration.”

“What we do now digitally with computers, Ray Harryhausen
See full article at Variety - Film News »

What to Buy This Week: DVD and Blu-ray releases for March 11th

It’s Monday, so we all know what that means! Yes, it’s time for another rundown of DVDs and Blu-ray’s hitting stores online and offline this week. It’s a very light week this week, so let us breakdown the new releases and highlight what you should – and shouldn’t – be buying from today, March 11th 2013.

Pick Of The Week

The Tall Man (DVD/Blu-ray)

Mystery thriller written and directed by Pascal Laugier. The small town of Cold Rock has long suffered since the mines which used to supply jobs and prosperity have closed down. With not much hope for the community of Cold Rock anyway, matters are only made worse by the disappearance of local children at the hands of local legend, ‘The Tall Man’. Jessica Biel plays young nurse, Julia Dunning, whose child is the latest to be abducted, and while in pursuit of the ‘Tall
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

"Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan" Documentary Gets UK DVD And Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
Ray Harryhausen:

Special Effects Titan

Written and directed by Gilles Penso

Produced by Alexandre Poncet, Co-produced by Tony Dalton

Featuring Ray Harryhausen, James Cameron, Terry Gilliam, John Landis, Nick Park, Steven Spielberg, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton, Joe Dante, Guillermo Del Toro

Release date: On DVD and Blu-ray from 11th March 2013

Running time: 97 mins (film), Cert: tbc

“I think all of us who are practitioners in the arts of science fiction and fantasy movies now, all feel that we’re standing on the shoulders of a giant. If not for Ray’s contribution to the collective dreamscape we wouldn’t be who we are.” James Cameron

The remarkable career of the movie industry’s most admired and influential special-effects auteur, the legendary Ray Harryhausen, is the subject of Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan. Described as “A continual delight” (The Observer), “the stop-motion maestro gets the respect he deserves” (Daily Express
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Vote for Cinelinx's Vic Medina to win a Rondo Award!

  • Cinelinx
Submit your vote for Reviewer of the Year!

Every year, the Classic Horror Film Board recognizes the best in the horror/sci-fi/fantasy realm with the Rondo Hatton Classic Horror Awards. Fans of the genre can vote for their favorites in over thirty categories, and this year, Cinelinx would like to ask you to vote for one of our own, staff writer Victor Medina, as Reviewer of the Year (Category 29)! We've even included the ballot below so you can vote!

Votes must be submitted by copying and pasting the ballot into your personal email, making your choices, including your name, and sending it in. Votes for Reviewer of the Year are write-in only, so you must be sure to include Vic's name yourself under Category 29 when you vote. Pre-filled ballots are not allowed, so we can't do it for you! Remember, you must write in "Victor Medina, Cinelinx.com" yourself.
See full article at Cinelinx »

"Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan" Documentary To Be Released Theatrically In The UK 9 November

  • CinemaRetro
Ray Harryhausen:

.

Special Effects Titan

Written and directed by Gilles Penso

Produced by Alexandre Poncet, Co-produced by Tony Dalton

Featuring Ray Harryhausen, Tony Dalton, James Cameron, Terry Gilliam, John Landis, Nick Park, Steven Spielberg, Peter Jackson, Tim Burton, Joe Dante, Guillermo Del Toro

Release date: At cinemas from 9th November 2012

Certificate: tbc

Running time: 94 mins

“I think all of us who are practitioners in the arts of science fiction and fantasy movies now, all feel that we’re standing on the shoulders of a giant. If not for Ray’s contribution to the collective dreamscape we wouldn’t be who we are.” James Cameron

The remarkable career of the movie industry’s most admired and influential special-effects auteur, the legendary Ray Harryhausen, is the subject of Gilles Penso’s definitive documentary Ray Harryhausen: Special Effects Titan.

Leaving no doubt as to Harryhausen’s seminal influence on modern-day special effects,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

A Brief History of the Weird West in Movies

An interesting sub-genre called the Weird West has been around longer than most people think, and certainly Cowboys & Aliens won’t be the last, but it might be one of the more successful film mash-ups in the rarely talked about genre. First of all, what’s the Weird West? It’s a term used to describe a western that uses sci-fi, horror, or fantasy elements in its narrative. And although it was popularized by authors, especially Joe R. Lansdale, it has had a long history in film dating back all the way to the early 1930s.

Because of the iconic themes and ideals with in the western movie, which often mirrors the fantastical elements in a sci-fi tale, such as (but not limited to) unknown wilderness and the survival of pioneers, and social decay and order, it would not be very long before the two genres merged, given us a
See full article at Killer Films »
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