Columbo (1971–2003)
7.8/10
2,440
37 user 8 critic

Suitable for Framing 

A wealthy art collector is murdered, and all signs point to a robbery gone wrong. But the nephew's alibi is a little too convenient, and Columbo pulls a fast one to ferret out the killer.

Director:

Hy Averback

Writers:

Jackson Gillis, Richard Levinson (created by) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Peter Falk ... Columbo
Ross Martin ... Dale Kingston
Don Ameche ... Frank Simpson
Kim Hunter ... Edna Matthews
Rosanna Huffman Rosanna Huffman ... Tracy O'Connor
Joan Shawlee ... Mitilda
Barney Phillips ... Captain Wyler
Mary Wickes ... Landlady
Vic Tayback ... Sam Franklin
Sandra Gould ... Matron
Curt Conway ... Evans
Claude Johnson ... Policeman
Dennis Rucker Dennis Rucker ... Parking Boy (Joe)
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Storyline

Lt. Columbo investigates the murder of Rudy Matthews, an art collector found shot to death in his home. The killer is the dead man's nephew, art critic Dale Kingston, who, with the help of his accomplice Tracy O'Connor, effectively masks the time of death to give himself an alibi at an art exhibit. From the outset, Columbo can't quite understand why the thief would have first selected a painting of lesser value before suddenly switching to the two most valuable paintings after the killing. Kingston tries to point Columbo in the direction of his aunt, Matthews' ex-wife Edna. The fact that Matthews left his entire art collection to her seems to support that idea. Columbo isn't buying it and sets a clever trap for him. Written by garykmcd / corrected by statmanjeff

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Mary Wickes also played a landlady who first reluctantly and then quite gladly tells the personal dating life of her deceased tenant in the 1960's drama Fate Is The Hunter. See more »

Goofs

While in the TV studio, Columbo asks Dale if the coffee machine works and Dale confirms it does. After Columbo puts coins in the coffee machine, he instantly removes the cup of coffee from the machine (which should have taken some time for the machine to fill). Columbo waves the hand holding the coffee around as if the cup was empty while talking to Dale. In the same scene the cup is in his right hand, then it disappears, only to re-appear at the end of the scene, where Columbo puts the cup on a table after having never once taken a sip of coffee. See more »

Quotes

[Columbo comes to the gallery to question Sam Franklin, who's painting in the next room]
Mitilda: Sam! Uh, this is the policeman who phoned. Is it all right?
Sam Franklin: [wearily] Eh, bring him in. They interrupted Rembrandt. Why shouldn't they interrupt me?
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Soundtracks

Promenade
from Pictures at an Exhibition
by Modest Mussorgsky
Heard during the cocktail party sequence in the art gallery
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User Reviews

 
What a great ending!
7 March 2012 | by TheLittleSongbirdSee all my reviews

I have said many times that I love Columbo, and while Suitable for Framing is not one of my favourites of the series, there are so many things to love about it. I do agree that there is the odd noticeable continuity error such as with the paintings and the fruit bowl, but they weren't so frequent to distract myself from watching a highly entertaining episode. The locations and fashions are striking, once you get past Dale Kingston's over-sized bow tie, and Suitable for Framing is slickly edited mostly, and the music is fitting with the setting and adds to the mood. The story is very clever, with one of my favourite endings of any of the Columbo episodes because of Falk's facial expression that speaks so many words without saying anything and there is quite a bit of tension here as well, and the episode is tightly written, with a perfect balance of the humorous and the intense. Peter Falk is brilliant as always, and Ross Martin's short-tempered and disdainful Kingston really contrasts well with Columbo. Don Ameche was a fine actor, and a pleasure to see here, and Kim Hunter is also good. All in all, a great Columbo with a great ending. 9/10 Bethany Cox


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

17 November 1971 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Mord in Pastell See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Universal Television See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color | Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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