7.1/10
34,337
116 user 51 critic

Bedknobs and Broomsticks (1971)

Trailer
1:32 | Trailer
An apprentice witch, three kids and a cynical magician conman search for the missing component to a magic spell to be used in the defense of Britain in World War II.

Directors:

Robert Stevenson, Ward Kimball (uncredited)

Writers:

Ralph Wright (animation story), Ted Berman (animation story) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
3,897 ( 375)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Angela Lansbury ... Miss Price
David Tomlinson ... Emelius
Roddy McDowall ... Mr. Jelk
Sam Jaffe ... Bookman
John Ericson ... Col. Heller
Bruce Forsyth ... Swinburne
Cindy O'Callaghan Cindy O'Callaghan ... Carrie
Roy Snart Roy Snart ... Paul
Ian Weighill ... Charlie
Tessie O'Shea Tessie O'Shea ... Mrs. Hobday
Arthur Gould-Porter Arthur Gould-Porter ... Capt. Greer (as Arthur E. Gould-Porter)
Ben Wrigley Ben Wrigley ... Portobello Rd. Workman
Reginald Owen ... Gen. Teagler
Cyril Delevanti ... Elderly Farmer
Rick Traeger Rick Traeger ... German Sergeant
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Storyline

During World War II in England, Charlie (Ian Weighill), Carrie (Cindy O'Callaghan), and Paul Rawlins (Roy Snart) are sent to live with Miss Eglantine Price (Dame Angela Lansbury), who, as it turns out, is an apprentice witch. Charlie blackmails Miss Price that if he is to keep her practices a secret, she must give him something, so she takes a bedknob from her late father's bed and places the "famous magic travelling spell" on it, and only Paul can activate it. Their first journey is to a street in London, where they meet Emelius Browne (David Tomlinson), former headmaster of Miss Price's witchcraft training correspondence school. Miss Price tells him of a plan to find the magic words for a spell known as "Substitutiary Locomotion", which brings inanimate objects to life. This spell will be her work for the war effort. Written by Matthew Anscher <anscher@radonc.duke.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

You'll beWITCHED! You'll beDAZZLED! You'll be swept into a world of enchantment BEYOND ANYTHING BEFORE! See more »


Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman wrote two songs that never made it past pre-production, despite Richard's protests. In "The Fundamental Element", Miss Eglantine Price would've explained her philosophy to the children after turning Charlie into a rabbit. Miss Price would've sung "Solid Citizen" to distract King Leonidas and get the magic star; ultimately, the soccer game replaced it. Both went unheard until demos performed by Richard Sherman appeared on the CD soundtrack re-issue. Part of "The Fundamental Element" was incorporated into the "Don't Let Me Down" portion of "Eglantine". See more »

Goofs

At the Portobello Road market, Miss Price checks all of the intact volumes on each stall to find the missing second half of Astoroth's book. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Captain Ainsley Greer: You there, which way to Pepperinge Eye?
Elderly Farmer: Couldn't say, sir. It said on the wireless to paint out the sign posts in case the Nazis drop in.
Captain Ainsley Greer: I'm not a Nazi, I'm a British officer!
Elderly Farmer: That's what you'd say if you *was* a Nazi, isn't it sir?
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Crazy Credits

King Leonidas is referred to on-screen by name, by is only credited as "Lion." See more »

Alternate Versions

During the dubbing process for the German version in the early '70s, it was decided to remove all scenes featuring Nazis. This version was also released on DVD and video. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Inside 'The Spy Who Loved Me' (2000) See more »

Soundtracks

Substitutiary Locomotion
(uncredited)
Performed by Angela Lansbury, David Tomlinson, Ian Weighill, Cindy O'Callaghan, and Roy Snart
Music and Lyrics by Richard M. Sherman and Robert B. Sherman
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User Reviews

 
My personal favorite
8 August 2001 | by Thornfield2See all my reviews

I loved this masterpiece and quite frankly I, too found Mary Poppins (although I love Julie Andrews and Dick VanDyke) to be silly and sacrine-sweet. Angela Lansbury plays her character to perfection and I don't know why people think of this film as distorted. It was magical and it was lots of fun to watch. Every scene held a certain charm as you got to know the characters better. You truly see how this little thrown together family learn to bond with each other, despite their age and differences. I thought the characters were well developed, especially Charles who was at "The Age of not Believing". Mary Poppins may be more popular and cherished by others but this little gem will be the one that I will always love and cherish.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Official Sites:

Official site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

13 December 1971 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Bedknobs and Broomsticks: 25th Anniversary Special Edition See more »

Filming Locations:

Dorset, England, UK See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$20,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (1996) (restored) | (re-release) (1980) | (initial US release) (November 1971)

Sound Mix:

3 Channel Stereo (RCA Sound Recording) (5.0) (L-R)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
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