Bananas (1971) - News Poster

(1971)

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Dancing with the past by Anne-Katrin Titze

Arnaud Desplechin with Mathieu Amalric: "What I love about the scene of the dance between Charlotte Gainsbourg (Sylvia) and Marion Cotillard (Carlotta) - is that Marion is on the side of life." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

In the final installment of my conversation with the Ismael’s Ghosts: Director’s Cut (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël) director Arnaud Desplechin and his longtime star Mathieu Amalric (My Golden Days, La Sentinelle, Un Conte De Noël, Rois Et Rein, My Sex Life... or How I Got into an Argument, Jimmy P: Psychotherapy of a Plains Indian), we discuss the dance scene between Charlotte Gainsbourg and Marion Cotillard, Mathieu's performance of the theme from Alfred Hitchcock's Marnie, composer Grégoire Hetzel, the modesty of Ivan Dedalus (Louis Garrel), John Gielgud's character in Alain Resnais' Providence, and what could be the opposite of a scene from Woody Allen's Bananas.

Arnaud Desplechin on Mathieu
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Review: Woody Allen's "Bananas" (1971); Twilight Time Blu-ray Release

  • CinemaRetro
“There Are No Bananas In It”

By Raymond Benson

Woody Allen’s second feature film as director/writer/actor is ranked #69 on AFI’s 100 greatest comedies list… and it is indeed a very funny, zany picture (arguably one of Allen’s funniest) that today says more about the early 1970s than perhaps was intended at the time. But would millennials find Bananas funny in this day and age? Would they get the jokes? Can an audience that hasn’t “grown up” with Woody Allen movies get past what has been said about his personal life since the 1990s? I can’t answer those questions. But I can place Bananas within the context of when it was released and attest that it still makes me laugh.

At this point in his career, Allen was mostly interested in making low budget movies with little substance, but with lots of gags. He was
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The dreamers of dreams by Anne-Katrin Titze

The lineup for Ismael’s Ghosts: Director’s Cut - Mathieu Amalric with Anne-Katrin Titze and director Arnaud Desplechin Photo: Lilia Blouin

Arnaud Desplechin's Ismael's Ghosts: Director's Cut (Les Fantômes D'Ismaël), screenplay by the director with Léa Mysius and Julie Peyr, cinematography by Irina Lubtchansky (My Golden Days, La forêt), stars Mathieu Amalric, Marion Cotillard and Charlotte Gainsbourg with Louis Garrel, László Szabó, Alba Rohrwacher, and Hippolyte Girardot.

On the afternoon before the New York Film Festival premiere, Arnaud Desplechin and Mathieu Amalric discussed with me what to do with a phantom, Woody Allen's Bananas and the theme from Marnie, a touch of Claude Lanzmann (Fours Sister - Special Event), de-whispering with Rilke, suffering with Philip Roth, Jackson Pollock and the "real pleasure to do too much", Jacques Lacan's Seminar VIII in Tel Aviv, loving someone like an apple, what makes a good dreamer, second chances, and never abandoning Vertigo.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex* (*But Were Afraid to Ask)

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1972 / 1:85 / Street Date July 18th, 2017

Starring: Woody Allen, Gene Wilder, Tony Randall, Burt Reynolds

Cinematography: David M. Walsh

Film Editor: Eric Albertson

Written by Woody Allen

Produced by Jack Brodsky, Elliott Gould

Music: Mundell Lowe

Directed by Woody Allen

A how-to book for fledgling libertines, David Reuben’s bestselling Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Sex (But Were Afraid to Ask) was the kind of sex manual that could remain on the coffee table when the in-laws arrived. An everyman’s guide to the birds and the bees, it ambled through its range of racy topics, from sodomy, cunnilingus to, um, plastic surgery for the genitalia, with both commonsensical and alarmingly retrograde attitudes, dispensing its advice with all the excitement of an insurance agent’s visit. When Woody Allen was given the opportunity to adapt it,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Annie Hall: the greatest rom-com ever?

Robin Bell Aug 10, 2017

Woody Allen's Annie Hall is regarded as one of the best romantic comedies ever. We take a look back at a classic...

When writing about films that you love, it is very easy to begin with a preamble where you eulogise about the said film in a way that only discusses your feelings for it, and doesn't delve into and analyse the reasons why the film is so important. I will try to avoid that here and get straight to the point as to why Annie Hall is the greatest romantic comedy of all time. I feel this is the introduction the film requires - a little awkward, and wanting to analyse everything that little bit deeper.

Annie Hall breaks so many supposed 'rules' that films have. If you narrow that down to the rules of the romantic comedy then it completely obliterates them. In terms of the romantic comedy,
See full article at Den of Geek »

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Take the Money and Run originally had a different ending that was cut by editor Ralph Rosenblum. What was it?

Woody is killed in a bloody gun ambush. Woody becomes president. Woody appears to tear a hole in the movie screen and “escapes” into the theater.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Friends Effing Friends Effing Friends: Woody Allen's Godson Tries to Direct a Comedy

Quincy Rose, the godson of Woody Allen and the offspring of the late Mickey Rose (an Allen collaborator on films such as Bananas and a writer for The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson), has just scribed, directed, produced, and edited his second feature film, Friends Effing Friends Effing Friends (Fefef) so roll out the red carpet and blow the horns. Such an amazing lack of talent has seldom been contained in a mere 117 minutes.

This is not to propose that Mr. Rose is totally bereft of any artistry. The trailer for his initial effort, Miles to Go (2012), in which he stars, displays an engagingly high-strung neuroticism in his Allenesque take on heterosexual relationships, and you can't help but wish he had cast himself as a lead in Fefef.

But before I decimate the theatrics and the writing, let's confront the plot. Two childhood buddies -- one circumcised, the other not
See full article at CultureCatch »

Bananas

Very smart and very silly, Woody Allen solidified his standing as a Groucho Marx for the new generation in Bananas, a throwback to the Marx Brothers’ absurdist comedies of the thirties shot through the cynical prism of Nixon’s seventies. In this 1971 farce, Woody finds himself propped up as the political leader of a Latin American revolution when all he’s really trying to do is get laid. The late, great Jack Davis did the appropriately “Mad” poster art.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Newswire: Here’s what’s coming to (and going from) Hulu this October

The CW’s Smallville has begun looking more and more like a trendsetter in recent years, with its low-budget, DC Comics-based model paving the way for the current dominance of superhero shows on TV. And even though the Superman prequel series was often imperfect, it did include a few hidden delights, including fun villain turns from Michael Rosenbaum and the hammily fantastic Jon Glover as the evil-hearted Luthor clan. Now, you can see the whole thing—meteor freaks, Brainiac, “The Blur,” and all—with Hulu bringing all ten seasons of the show to its streaming library next month, just in time for its 15th anniversary.

And if mid-2000s superhuman angst isn’t your speed, the service has also added a number of classic comedies to its October slate. Several Woody Allen movies (including Bananas and the recently lauded Midnight In Paris) are making the jump, along with the
See full article at The AV Club »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines

Woody Allen: A Career in 20 Hilarious, Brilliant Lines
This Friday, Café Society, the latest release from writer/director/comic godhead Woody Allen, waltzes into theaters — the 47th feature Allen has directed over a career spanning 50 years. (Yes, we're counting New York Stories.) He's had box-office successes and outright bombs, Oscar-winning masterpieces and critically panned duds. But regardless of his movies' receptions (and the reoccurring rumors about his personal life), he's managed to pump out a film a year with impressive regularity. Some key elements have stayed the same — once a jazz clarinet slinks onto the soundtrack, audiences know exactly who they're dealing with.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Comedy Bang! Bang! It's silly, it spoofy – it's the very definition of a hidden gem

This faux sketch show has talking books, phone-ins about murdering baby animals, celebrity guests like Amy Poehler and Paul Rudd – and it’s so absurd it barely holds together as a concept. I sorely need you to start watching

British Netflix is notoriously threadbare compared with its American cousin. In the Us, you can watch almost any film or TV show that has ever been made. In the UK, your choice basically consists of Aloha, that Bill Murray holiday special that temporarily made you despise Christmas and – because you watched Woody Allen’s BananasJack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.

But things are getting better. Because this week, the gloriously silly Comedy Bang! Bang! finally debuted on Netflix UK, and it’s the greatest thing to happen to the service in years. Greater, even, than the awful third series of House of Cards that everyone forced themselves to sit through out of
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

A Telling Look Back at the Century-Old Quest for Diversity in Entertainment

A Telling Look Back at the Century-Old Quest for Diversity in Entertainment
When Variety began, the entertainment industry was mostly live theater, circuses and vaudeville — and minstrel shows. Later, blacks were at the forefront in demanding equality in the entertainment industry and were followed by groups representing Latinos, Asians, Native Americans and women.

For better or worse, showbiz has always been a microcosm of the world. While black stars like Louis Armstrong were celebrated for their art, they were still denied access to hotels, drinking fountains and restaurants.

Many minorities were (and are) victimized by institutionalized prejudice. If anyone doubts that, it only requires a quick look at Variety’s 111 years of publication to find the proof.

The history of show business is a history of bias, which can be broken down into three general eras: Humiliation (1905-42) when grossly demeaning terms like “coon” and vile treatment were “normal”; protest (1942-49), when voices were raised in simple requests that demeaning stereotypes and
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Court Still Awaits Relativity Financing and Executive Plans

Court Still Awaits Relativity Financing and Executive Plans
Updated: Relativity Media returned to court Wednesday in its long-running battle to win approval of its exit from bankruptcy, though the real action took place outside the New York court room — with the company still trying to drum up proof that it has adequate financing and formal employment arrangements with its proposed new film executives — Kevin Spacey and his producing partner, Dana Brunetti.

The company still had not presented proof of those arrangements, which U.S. Bankruptcy Court Judge Michael Wiles has said he wanted to see before allowing Relativity’s emergence from bankruptcy to become effective.

Wednesday’s hearing instead focused on a convoluted claim by a would-be film writer and producer who said he was entitled to a place in the Relativity proceeding, a claim which the company rejected and Judge Wiles said he would take under submission.

Lawyers for the company previously had told Wiles that by
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Writers Guild of America names Annie Hall as funniest script

When talk turns to penning a great comedy film script, Woody Allen is often referred to as one of Hollywood’s best scribes. And now that honour seems to be official – the Writers Guild of America has named Annie Hall as the funniest movie of all time.

Members of the writers’ union have weighed in on what they deem to be the best comedies released in the English-language. The result is a list of 101 features topped by 1977’s Annie Hall.

Directed and co-written by Allen, and starring him opposite Diane Keaton, Annie Hall is centred on a neurotic New Yorker who falls in love with the titular heroine, a budding singer. The romantic comedy was a huge success at the time – winning four Oscars, including Best Picture – and remains a highly-acclaimed classic.

Other Allen titles that made the cut are Sleepers, Bananas, Love and Death, Manhattan and Broadway Danny Rose.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

According to the Writers Guild, 'Annie Hall' is the funniest screenplay ever

  • Hitfix
According to the Writers Guild, 'Annie Hall' is the funniest screenplay ever
What's the funniest movie you've ever seen? According to the Writers Guild of America, it's Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman's "Annie Hall."  That's the top of its just-released ranking of the 101 funniest screenplays, and Woody Allen appears several more times on the list: "Sleeper" (60), "Bananas" (69), "Take the Money and Run" (76), "Love and Death" (78), "Manhattan" (81), and "Broadway Danny Rose" (92). Harold Ramis made five appearances on the list, with "Groundhog Day" (3), "National Lampoon's Animal House" (10), "Ghostbusters" (14), "Caddyshack" (25), and "Stripes" (88). And Mel Brooks had "just" three screenplays on the list but they all ranked highly: "Young Frankenstein" (6), "Blazing Saddles" (8), and "The Producers" (12). He's also credited with "The Big Lebowski" (13), but he didn't write that, so I'm sure the WGA will correct its error shortly. (The Coen Brothers, who did write it, also appear at number 23 with "Raising Arizona" and 86 with "Fargo.") The most recent movie to make the list is 2011's "Bridesmaids
See full article at Hitfix »

Woody Allen's 'Annie Hall' Voted Funniest Screenplay of All Time

Woody Allen's 'Annie Hall' Voted Funniest Screenplay of All Time
Woody Allen's groundbreaking 1977 comedy Annie Hall triumphed over 100 other films – including a handful of the director's other works – to land at Number One on the Writers Guild of America's list of the 101 Funniest Screenplays. The comedy's Allen- and Marshall Brickman-penned script beat out a Top Five that included 1959's Some Like It Hot (Number Two), 1993's Groundhog Day (Three), 1980's Airplane! (Four) and 1982's Tootsie.

In total, Allen placed seven scripts on the 101 Funniest Screenplays list, with Sleeper, Bananas, Take the Money and Run, Love and Death, Manhattan
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Writers Guild of America Names 'Annie Hall' the Funniest Screenplay of All Time

Writers Guild of America Names 'Annie Hall' the Funniest Screenplay of All Time
Read More: The 25 Best Comedies Of The 21st Century So Far The Writers Guild of America has weighed in on the funniest films of all time, putting together a list of 101 features they consider to be the best comedies the movie business has ever offered. The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at Hollywood's Arclight Cinema Dome over a two-hour discussion panel hosted by Rob Reiner. The WGA East announced the winners in New York at the New School Auditorium in Greenwich Village. Woody Allen's Oscar-winning screenplay for "Annie Hall" topped the list, though it was just one of seven titles by the writer-director that was included on the list. Allen's other entries included "Sleeper," "Bananas," "Take the Money and Run," "Broadway Danny Rose," "Love and Death" and "Manhattan." "Some Like it Hot," "Groundhog Day," "Airplane!" and "Tootsie" rounded out...
See full article at Indiewire »

The 101 Funniest Screenplays of All-Time, According to the WGA

Perhaps the most subjective genre in cinema, the same comedy can cause one viewer to have tears of laughter and another to not crack a smile. So, while knowing there can be no definitive list of the finest in the genre, the Writers Guild of America attempted to narrow down the 101 funniest screenplays. Noting the distinction from the best in the genre, these 101 films should simply produce the most laughs.

Topping the list is Woody Allen‘s Best Picture-winning Annie Hall, a choice difficult to argue with. Rounding out the top five were Some Like it Hot, Groundhog Day, Airplane! and Tootsie, while films from the Coens, Stanley Kubrick, Wes Anderson, and Edgar Wright were also mentioned. There are also some genuine head-scratching inclusions, including The Hangover at 30, and, as much as I enjoy the film, Bridesmaids nearly making the top 15, but overall, if one is looking to brighten their mood,
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘Annie Hall’ Named Funniest Screenplay by WGA Members

‘Annie Hall’ Named Funniest Screenplay by WGA Members
Annie Hall” has been named the funniest screenplay in voting by the members of the Writers Guild of America.

The script by Woody Allen and Marshall Brickman topped “Some Like it Hot,” “Groundhog Day,” “Airplane!” and “Tootsie,” which make up the rest of the top five. “Young Frankenstein,” “Dr. Strangelove,” “Blazing Saddles,” “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “National Lampoon’s Animal House” rounded out the top 10.

The awards for the 101 funniest screenplays were announced at the Arclight Cinerama Dome in Hollywood at the conclusion of two hours of panel discussions and clips, hosted by Rob Reiner. He noted that his “This Is Spinal Tap” script had finished at the No. 11 spot — a coincidence that recalled the “go to 11” amplifier joke in the film.

The “Annie Hall” screenplay won the Oscar for Best Original Screenplay in 1977. Allen had six other scripts on the list — “Sleeper,” “Bananas,” “Take the Money and Run,
See full article at Variety - Film News »
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