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All in the Family (TV Series 1971–1979) Poster

(1971–1979)

Trivia

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Carroll O'Connor was living in Italy when he was offered the role of Archie Bunker. He accepted the role only on the condition that the producers would pay for his flight back to Italy if the pilot was not picked up.
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Carroll O'Connor's personal views on political and social issues were actually very liberal, and the polar opposite to those of Archie.
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Notoriously, the first toilet flush in American prime time television was heard on this show.
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An ongoing gag is Edith's incompetent singing. In actuality, Jean Stapleton was a professionally trained and accomplished singer who had performed in musical theatre and productions throughout her career.
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Penny Marshall was considered for the part of Gloria. At the time of the series she was married to Rob Reiner.
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Of the show's spin-offs, The Jeffersons (1975) was the longest running, airing for 11 seasons, two more seasons than "All In The Family" lasted. "The Jeffersons" ended in a similar fashion as "Archie Bunker's Place"; the network making the decision to abruptly cancelling each series without informing the actors, which in both cases caused a lot of bitterness from the cast and crew and a general feeling of unfairness in the industry. "The Jeffersons" was at a ratings nadir, but with "Archie Bunker's Place", the cancelation possibly resulted from the network punishing Norman Lear and Carroll O'Connor, who regularly engaged in confrontations with CBS over salary and censorship issues for so many years, but the network was unable to muscle them out while the show's ratings were still respectable. Once the ratings fell into a prolonged slump, however (but still better than the Jeffersons' final season), CBS was finally in a position to throw their weight around.
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Archie and Edith's easy-chairs are now on display at the Smithsonian.
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Rob Reiner was already losing his hair so rapidly when the show debuted that he started wearing a hairpiece halfway through the show's first season.
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Norman Lear planned to end the show with season 8; All in the Family: The Stivics Go West (1978) would have been the finale; there was even a goodbye party after the taping and a People Magazine cover commemorating the supposed finale. However, Carroll O'Connor and CBS wanted the show to continue, so Lear and Tandem Productions relented, and Jean Stapleton was convinced to return, while Rob Reiner and Sally Struthers were not.
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Jean Stapleton decided to do the series over starring in Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971). She would have played Mrs. Teevee. Stapleton made the right choice as All in the Family ran for 9 years; and Stapleton also appeared on the spinoff for a year after that. And she won worldwide fame and acclaim for her work on the show; one of the most popular and influential shows of all time; as well as several Emmys.
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Archie Bunker always wore his wedding ring on his middle finger.
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Writers considered a story line in which Archie had an affair with next door neighbor and contrast/foil Irene Lorenzo, but the plans were dropped as it was determined to be too far out of character for both Archie and Irene.
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When CBS started rerunning the show during the day in 1975, it was edited by three minutes to allow more commercial time. Norman Lear was unhappy with the editing and offered to pay for the commercial time that would have been lost by showing it uncut, but CBS declined his offer. When the episodes were offered in syndication to other stations, those exact edited versions were used for decades until TVLand took the show during the 90s (where it was necessary to re-edit the episodes to make room for even more commercial time); TVLand on occasion ran every episode uncut in 35-minute showings.
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Archie's line "Stifle, Edith!" was ranked #12 in TV Guide's list of "TV's 20 Top Catchphrases" (21-27 August 2005 issue).
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The story arc regarding Gloria's pregnancy and birth of Baby Joey was originally intended for the fifth season. Those plans were put on hold due to Carroll O'Connor's holdout to start that season, which resulted in newer scripts written to open that season reflecting Archie's unexpected absence (the infamous "Where's Archie?" story arc; much like the "Who Shot JR" story arc on Dallas, used for the same purpose); the producers facing the possibility that O'Connor might not be returning.
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The Bunkers' neighbors Frank and Irene Lorenzo disappeared from the series with no explanation. Vincent Gardenia, who played Frank, quit the series after eight appearances as Frank due to personal disputes with Norman Lear. Betty Garrett continued as Irene until the middle of season six, leaving the series to care for a sick relative (some say she left the series to join the cast of Laverne & Shirley (1976), but she didn't make her debut in that show until the following October). On Laverne and Shirley, she played alongside Rob Reiner's wife Penny Marshall who had auditioned for the Gloria role in 1970, but was passed over in favor of Sally Struthers.
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This was the first television program to earn Emmys for all of its principal cast members. Although the Odd Couple, which actually aired a year before All in the Family, from 1970 to 1975; also produced Emmys for both it's stars Jack Klugman and Tony Randall. But All in the Family was the first "larger cast" sitcom that would obtain this honor. The Golden Girls and Will and Grace would be the other sitcoms that accomplished this.
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When the initial furor after the premiere died down, ratings were so low that the show was about to be cancelled. Then, to the genuine surprise of many connected with the show, it started building a substantial audience during the 1971 summer re-run season. In August of that year, less than a month before the 1971-72 season was scheduled to begin, CBS announced that the series would be renewed.
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Starting with the sixth season, the names of the cast appear before the show's title.
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Sally Struthers sued to get out of her contract in 1974. Needless to say, she failed. Ironically, she would later complain to the press that she could not get any work AFTER All in the Family.
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According to Norman Lear, many of the show's catch phrases including "Meat Head," "Dingbat," and "Stifle" were inspired by the same words he heard from his father while growing up.
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Originally the theme tune was going to be performed by an orchestra. However, due to budgetary concerns it was decided that series stars Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton perform the song seated at the piano. The two stars updated their rendition each year. The theme was performed by the Ray Conniff Singers when it became Archie Bunker's Place (1979). For the spinoff series Archie Bunker's Place the theme song became an instrumental performed by a professional orchestra, as originally planned.
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The episode "Edith's 50th Birthday" was originally intended to be an episode of One Day at a Time (1975), with Ann Romano as the victim.
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Rob Reiner and Billy Crystal were best friends in real life, which is why it makes sense that Crystal was brought in to play Mike's close friend in the "New Years Wedding" episode.
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In one episode, Archie Bunker, without knowing it, issued what turned out to be a correct prophecy: During an argument with the "Meathead" in Kelsey's Bar, the latter walks out at the end, with Archie yelling out the door after him: "You're gonna get Ree-gan in 1980, wise guy!"
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The role of Mike Stivic was offered to Harrison Ford who turned down the part because he felt Archie Bunker's bigotry was too offensive. Richard Dreyfuss was also up for the role. (Imagine how different the show would have turned out with Penny Marshall as Gloria, Richard Dreyfuss as Michael, and Mickey Rooney as Archie; as originally imagined!)
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In contrast to the often antagonistic relationship between Archie and Mike, Carroll O'Connor and Rob Reiner formed a close friendship over the course of making the series. In addition Reiner came to regard O'Connor as both an acting mentor and surrogate father.
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The penultimate line of the theme song is "Gee, our old LaSalle ran great." Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton slurred the line some, and the LaSalle--a lower-priced version of the Cadillac that was made by General Motors in the 1930s--was not much remembered, so few people could make sense of this line. In later seasons the opening theme was re-shot and O'Connor pronounced the line phonetically "Gee..our..old..La Salle..ran..great" so that people could understand it easier.
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Reportedly, Rob Reiner, on his way to the studio during the series' pre-production, had picked up Mike Evans hitch-hiking and asked him what he did for work. Evans claimed he was an aspiring actor with no real experience, Rob arranged for an audition for the role of Lionel Jefferson. According to director John Rich, Evans' acting in the audition was poor but he still felt that Evans would be great in the role.
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Had Archie's character been killed off as a result of Carroll O'Connor's contract dispute, the show would have been centered around Archie's best friend, Stretch Cunningham, played by James Cromwell. Stretch would have moved in with the Bunkers to look after his best friend's family following his death. However, once O'Connor's contract dispute was resolved, the Stretch Cunningham character made two more appearances, then killed off in a later season. This was at Carroll Oconnor's insistence. Understandable, since no lead actor in a series wants their understudy hovering around in the background! Ironically just as Cromwell almost became the lead on All in the Family; he also almost got cast on MASH as BJ Honneycut during the same period of time, when he was narrowly edged out by Mike Farrell.
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Sometime prior to becoming involved in the show, Carroll O'Connor read an article about Till Death Us Do Part (1965), the British sitcom on which "All in the Family" would be based. After reading the article, O'Connor commented to his wife how no one would ever be able get away with doing such a series in the US.
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The New York City home whose exterior (only) was a stand-in for the Bunkers's TV house stands on Cooper Ave. near 89th St. in the Glendale section of the borough of Queens.
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Rob Reiner grew his mustache to appear older, as producers initially felt he looked too young for the part. Eventually, in season 7, Reiner dropped the mustache, but grew it back a few episodes later.
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The series saw something of a revival in the early 1990's. Following the success of a 20th Anniversary Retrospective special in February 1991 (which has been released on VHS but strangely never on disc), CBS rebroadcast series episodes in prime time that summer. The airings drew better than expected ratings, and positive reactions. As a result, the network continued to air the series at times throughout the 1991-92 TV season. At times the rebroadcasts drew higher ratings than original programming airing in prime time, including much of CBS' own programming.
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All in the Family has spun off more shows than almost any other television program. All in the Family spun off Maude (1972) which spun off Good Times (1974). It spun off The Jeffersons (1975) which spun off Checking In (1981). It spun off Archie Bunker's Place (1979), 704 Hauser (1994) as well as Gloria (1982). That's 7 programs spun off from one TV show. The only other TV show that comes close in terms of record spinoffs would be Happy Days (1974).
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Norman Lear's father used to call him Meathead when he was a child, and Lear gave that "nickname" to Mike Stivic.
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For each episode, two performances were taped and the broadcast version combined the best takes from the two, which is how almost all comedy series are shot today (which explains various minor continuity errors that turn up). Any flubbed lines by the actors would be re-shot as "pick-ups" after the audience had departed. This was also the first comedy series shot on videotape rather than film.
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During a contract hold out, Carroll O'Connor missed the taping of three episodes; two of them involving Archie failing to return from a convention. The producers gave O'Connor an ultimatum, that the story arc could conclude with Edith finding out that Archie had been murdered. The third episode filmed during O'Connor's hold out ("All in the Family (1971) {Mike's Friend (#5.14)}') has Edith making a reference to Archie regarding when they bought the house, which left it fitting the continuity whether Carroll O'Connor had returned or not by the time the episode aired, as it was held back and shown months later. According to Fred Silverman (one of the heads of CBS), he met O'Connor at a bar (where the two proceeded to become inebriated) at the deadline imposed by the network of O'Connor's decision of whether or not to return to the show. Carroll had already decided not to return, but Silverman managed to change his mind and meeting his previous conditions if he returned.
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When the characters of George and Louise Jefferson were first introduced during the first season, only Louise was seen at first and George was only talked about. Sherman Hemsley, who was Norman Lear's first choice to play George, was performing in the Broadway musical "Purlie" and didn't want to break his commitment to that show. However, Norman Lear kept the role waiting for him until he was finished appearing in the musical, while George's brother Henry (played by Mel Stewart) was featured living with the family.
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The character Archie Bunker was ranked #24 in TV Guide's list of the "50 Greatest TV Dads of All Time" (20 June 2004 issue).
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In "Gloria's False Alarm" (Episode 7.14), Edith reveals that Gloria is an only child because after she was born, there were "some problems" (not caused by Gloria), and Edith's doctor recommended that she should not have any more children.
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In an "EmmyTvLegends" interview Isabel Sanford said she was coerced into doing the "The Jeffersons" by the "All in the Family" producers. When the "All in the Family" producers approached her about the spinoff, she declined, saying she felt more comfortable just staying on "All in the Family". They then told her if she didn't join the spinoff she would be written out of "All in the Family" and recast in the spinoff. "That made my decision easy", she said.
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Norman Lear was inspired to approach Jean Stapleton for the part of Edith upon seeing her perform in the Broadway musical "Damn Yankees," which was also a reprisal of her role in the 1958 film.
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Sally Struthers grew frustrated as she began to feel that the role of Gloria on the series was largely limited to defending Mike and Edith against Archie, espousing Women's issues and helping Edith with household chores. Struthers came to begrudgingly understand that this was due the fact that the character of such a young woman was being written largely from the perspective of middle aged men.
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At one point, during the opening credits, when "Edith" hits the (very) off notes on "And you knew where you were then", there was a laugh track that followed.
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Rob Reiner auditioned for the original pilot but was turned down. When the third pilot was in production, Norman Lear saw Reiner in Headmaster: Valerie Has an Emotional Gestalt for the Teacher (1970) and decided to give him another chance.
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Carroll O'Connor developed Archie's speech by drawing on and combining the myriad New York accents he heard while growing up in Queens, NY, and during his years of New York City stage work.
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The original pilot was titled "Justice for All" and was developed for ABC. Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton played Archie and Edith Justice. Kelly Jean Peters played Gloria and Tim McIntire played her husband, Richard. It was taped in October 1968 in New York City. After screening this first pilot, ABC gave the producers more money to shoot a second pilot titled "Those Were the Days". It was taped in February 1969 in Hollywood. Candice Azzara played Gloria and Chip Oliver played Richard. D'Urville Martin played Lionel Jefferson in both pilots. After ABC turned down the second pilot, CBS developed the third pilot titled "Meet the Bunkers", after retitling the series as "All in the Family". This pilot had the final cast and was the series' first episode. All three pilots utilized essentially the same script.
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Rob Reiner has said in recent interviews that he still gets called Meathead all the time to this day.
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In 1972 Jean Stapleton appeared on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (1967) and took part in a parody of "All in the Family". Although she played the Edith Bunker role in the parody, she refused to speak in the distinctive voice she used on All in the Family. Stapleton instead used her normal speaking voice, which sounded nothing like Edith Bunker.
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Voted #4 on TV Guide's 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time.
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Vincent Gardenia was meant to be a series regular, but he quit after a few episodes because he found his character, Frank Lorenzo, boring. (It also probably didn't help matters that Archie was constantly calling Frank a "fag"!) He also didn't appreciate how he and Betty Garrett were forced to sit around and do nothing during rehearsals (even for episodes they didn't appear in), as the four stars did the bulk of the work.
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When the show's first pilot was done in New York in 1968 it became the first time a sitcom in the United States used videotape as a recording device. Before that all sitcoms had been recorded on film or kinescoped. However, several variety shows and news shows had already used video taped. This would become a hot trend in the 70s and 80s, as shows like Who's The Boss, Roseanne, The Cosby Show, Maude, Soap, The Golden Girls, One Day at a Time, Silver Spoons, 227, Diffrent Strokes and Facts of Life would all use this method. (It's no coincidence that many of these are Norman Lear shows). But by the 90s videotape would become passe; most sitcoms went back to film at that point. And by the 2000s most sitcoms dropped the filming in front in front of a live studio audience bit; and dropped the canned laughter; and turned these shows into straightforward 30 minute mini movies; without laughter; thus subverting the sitcom traditions and tropes that Lucille Ball had solidified in the 50s.
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Gavin MacLeod read for the part of Archie, but did so reluctantly. He was personally opposed to bigotry of all kinds, and felt the subject matter was inappropriate in a comedic format. He also said at the time of his audition that he knew that Norman Lear had always been set on casting Carroll O'Connor for the role.
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In one episode Jean Stapleton played not only Edith Bunker but the dour, grumpy girlfriend of a local butcher who was in love with Edith, and found a girlfriend who looked exactly like Edith but was completely the opposite of her personality-wise. Having the leads play "dopplegangers" is a gimmick used in alot of sitcoms; Happy Days; (Al Delveccio and his twin brother; also Carmine Ragusso and his twin brother); the Brady Bunch (Pete and his unrelated school chum twin Arthur; Alice and her twin cousin Emma); Different Strokes (Kimberly and Mr. Drummond and their gender-swap twin cousins); the Patty Duke Show (Patty and Kathy the stars); Cheers (Carla and her lookalike cousin); and Here's Lucy (Lucy Carter and Lucille Ball). On All in the Family this was just done with Jean Stapleton/ Edith.
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Lucille Ball hated "All in the Family." After the pilot aired, Ball was quoted as saying it was "un-American, and how could CBS air my show and that show on the same channel?" Ball decried this show as part of the overall lewdness and corruption of post 60s American culture. Ironically she slammed this show for being lewd, but praised Three's Company, another very envelope-pushing sexually orientated type show. She even appeared on a special 100 episodes commemorative show for Three's Company as the host. Her Yours Mine and Ours co-star Henry Fonda hosted a similar 100th episode anniversary special for All in the Family.
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Ironically, though Rob Reiner is a liberal democrat, Rob Reiner admits that in reality Carroll O'Connor was more liberal than he was. Lear is also a liberal Democrat; as are most of the writers and crew members on the show; which make the claim that this show is right wing propaganda baffling.
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In the early 1990s Carroll O'Connor pushed his suggestion for a revived version of the series in which Archie worked full time as a cab driver. Most of the series would take place in Archie's cab, in which he would discuss the day's issues with his passengers. Norman Lear was not receptive to the idea, preferring to concentrate on developing 704 Hauser (1994) instead.
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According to Danielle Brisebois, during the series run from 1970-78 it was taped in front of a live studio audience. However, when the show entered its ninth season, 1978-79, the producers abandoned the studio audience (reportedly pushed by Carroll O'Connor, also managing to reduce the work week of cast and crew by one day) and began taping the show without the audience. However, after each episode was taped it would be shown to a studio audience and their laughter would be recorded. After the taping of Norman Lear's _"One Day at a Time" Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton would appear and play "Those Were The Days" live, followed by showing an episode of "All In The Family" played for live audience response. This would explain the change in the voiceover heard during the end credits of the 1978-79 season, with O'Connor now saying "'All In The Family' was played to a studio audience for live responses".
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Carroll O'Connor fought bitterly with Norman Lear during the production a couple times with boycotts and contract holdouts, and frequently clashing with Lear about the direction the show was taking. A writer himself he would rewrite Archie 's dialogue, sometimes with Lear's approval, sometimes not. Later he would sue Lear for royalties from The Jeffersons, which he thought he was due.
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In real life, Carroll O'Connor was very much the opposite of Archie Bunker" politically/socially liberal, intelligent and highly educated, well spoken and giving with his time and money. O'Connor said he accepted the role of Archie largely to challenge himself to tap into and explore the mind set of such a person.
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Norman Lear has said his primary premise for the show was to demonstrate that whatever differences existed between family members, in the end everyone can still come together and get along with each other.
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Gloria worked at the cosmetics counter at Kressler's department store.
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Betty Garrett played Archie's liberal tomboyish nemesis, Irene Lorenzo. Garrett had been blacklisted by Senator Joseph McCarthy and the House Un-American Activities Committee years before, due to alleged affiliations with the Communist Party and had struggled finding work, so "All in the Family" was a big break for her. She left during her her third year on "All in the Family", then was hired the following season for an even bigger role: Mrs. Babbish on the number one rated sitcom Laverne & Shirley (1976).
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Producer Norman Lear's original choice for Archie was Mickey Rooney, who declined. Lear began describing the character to Rooney as "a bigot who uses words like 'spade'" when Rooney interrupted him, saying "Norm, they're going to kill you, shoot you dead in the streets."
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Vincent Gardenia appeared in a couple of episodes before he assumed the role of Frank Lorenzo. His first appearance was as the neighbor who sold his house to the Jeffersons. The second one was when he played the husband of a swinging couple (Rue McClanahan played his wife), accidentally contacted by a naive Edith for friendship.
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Even accounting for the time prior to the departure of Rob Reiner and Sally Struthers, there were no cast members to appear in every episode of the series.
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Series producer Norman Lear wanted the show to be shot in black and white, but CBS refused to allow this, so he made the sets and much of the wardrobe sepia-toned.
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Tom Bosley, Jack Warden and Jackie Gleason were all considered for the role of Archie Bunker. In fact, CBS wanted to buy the rights to the original British show and retool it specifically for Gleason, who was under contract to them, but producer Norman Lear beat out CBS for the rights and offered the show to ABC.
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Carroll O'Connor has said that he doesn't think All in the Family affected any social or political changes in society, and neither did it have any lasting impact on television.
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With all of its spin-offs included, save 704 Hauser (1994), All in the Family (1971) ran for 15 straight years: All in the Family (1971), Maude (1972), Good Times (1974), The Jeffersons (1975), Archie Bunker's Place (1979), Checking In (1981), Gloria (1982).
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Edith's maiden name was Baines.
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The name of George Jefferson's brother, who was living with George and Louise, was Henry. In fact Henry once posed as George because George, who was as big a bigot as Archie, didn't want to set foot in the Bunker's house.
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A cartoon depiction of Archie freezing in his trademark chair was used by Time magazine on its December 3, 1973 cover to mark the height of the energy crisis. The caption read "The Big Freeze."
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On the show Archie was supposed to be older than Edith, but in real life Jean Stapleton was over a year older than Carroll O'Connor.
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The house seen in the opening and closing credits is at 89-70 Cooper Avenue in Queens, New York City. It is located directly across the street from a cemetery.
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Rob Reiner, who starred on All in the Family from 1971 to 1979, has said in interviews that Roseanne is similar to All in the Family in that it is centered around a reactionary character and it tackles timely issues. But Reiner says the difference is that All in the Family starred Carroll O'Connor, who was a liberal actor playing the reactionary Archie, whereas Roseanne starred Roseanne Barr as a reactionary woman basically playing herself, a reactionary woman.
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In 1979, the series was reformatted as Archie Bunker's Place (1979).
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Isabel Sanford, Sherman Hemsley and Mike Evans played the only spinoff characters from All in the Family to return to All in the Family after their show had been spun off. Hemsley and Evans returned for "Mike Makes His Move" in 1975 (Evans' final appearance), then Hemsley alone on "Mike's New Job" in 1978, (his final appearance). Sanford returned for an appearance on "The Family Next Door" in 1979, (her final appearance).
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Norman Lear has said that Archie and Edith were very much based on his father and mother. In fact, upon first learning. about All In The Family's basis Til Death Us Do Part, Lear was struck by how similar the show's parents were to his own parents.
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Mike was originally from Chicago (one episode actually stating "from outside Chicago"). This is referred to in several episodes, including the Mike and Gloria's Wedding (Part 1) episode, where we're introduced to Mike's Uncle Kas. Throughout the rest of the series, however, Kas is never seen again and only mentioned once more (in "Archie in the Cellar"). The only other relative of Mike's mentioned by name is his recently-deceased Uncle Alex in the episode "Mike Comes into Money".
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A few very early episodes featured some musical scoring, but the use of music outside the opening and closing themes was quickly dropped. There are very few if any taped sitcoms that have background music; and all of Lear's sitcoms, even the current One Day At a Time reboot, are taped. Filmed sitcoms, conversely, always have background music.
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In the porch scenes, if you look closely at the exterior of the home in Queens that was used, the porches didn't match. In the series, the porch held several people. The actual exterior that was filmed could not. The exterior used was also a duplex, which the Bunker home obviously wasn't.
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In 1983, CBS unceremoniously canceled Archie Bunker's Place despite the fact that the show was still earning respectable ratings. The network failed to inform Caroll O'Connor and his production company of their decision (Two years later, CBS axed another long-running Norman Lear hit, The Jeffersons (1975), in the same manner). There has been speculation that the cancellation was a political choice on the part of CBS; network executives were reportedly tired of fighting with O'Connor over various issues and no longer wanted to pay him (O'Connor earned millions from the series with salary and residuals). The final straw may have been over the spin-off series Gloria (1982), whose pilot episode O'Connor had personally supervised and even appeared in, and was produced by the Archie Bunker's Place production team. However, that pilot was rejected by the network, and CBS brought in new writers for a new pilot and the production of "Gloria" was moved from CBS Television City to Universal Studios. These decisions essentially shut O'Connor and the producers of Archie Bunker's Place out. According to Sally Struthers, O'Connor refused to have any involvement with the spin-off after that. "Gloria" was not well received by critics or audiences - though it did finish 18th for the season - and was canceled along with Archie Bunker's Place in 1983. O'Connor's original "Gloria" pilot was added to the season one "Archie Bunker's Place" DVD.
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During the end credits, the line of "All in the Family was recorded on tape before a live audience" was spoken by: Bud Yorkin (1971), Rob Reiner (1972-1978), and Carroll O'Connor (1979).
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In the original pilot, the title of the show was "Justice For All"; the second pilot had the show retitled "Those Were The Days". At the same time a song with the same name by Mary Hopkin was a big hit. When a third pilot was developed by CBS, they decided to change the title yet kept the theme song titled "Those Were The Days".
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The exact name of the college Mike attended was never mentioned or clearly indicated.
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Four pilots were shot (the first three essentially utilizing the same script); the first two for ABC - the first under the title "Justice for All" (with Carroll O'Connor's character being named Archie Justice), and the second under the title "Those Were the Days" (with the family name renamed Bunker). Different actors played the roles of Mike, Gloria, and Lionel in those two. Meathead was called Dickie, not Michael, and he was originally Irish-American, not Polish-American. The third was for CBS titled "Meet the Bunkers" (which turned out to be the first episode to air) starring the now-famous on-air cast, but even though CBS had picked up the show after this third pilot, they needed further convincing, so a fourth pilot "Writing the President" (which turned out to be the second episode to air) was shot.
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Archie's favorite baseball team was the NY Mets.
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The first show ever to be created by Norman Lear and the first Norman Lear show, whose sitcom adaptation was British.
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Both Carroll O'Connor and Sally Struthers boycotted the show for awhile to get more money (at different points in the production). Carroll did it during the infamous "Where's Archie?' story arc; as a way of explaining the actor's disappearance. Sally Struthers got away with her absence more easily since she is a supporting character; not the lead (but unlike O'Connor, she failed to get what she wanted)
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In an EmmyTvlegends interview Carroll O'Connor said that the character of Maude "didn't resemble anyone" he knew, and that Maude (1972) was a markedly inferior sitcom to his own. This might be a case of life imitating art since Archie didn't get along with Maude either.
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Archie's parents are David and Sarah. His mother's maiden name is Longstreet.
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Archie's nickname for Edith was "Dingbat." He pronounced Edith's real name as "Ee-dit."
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Archie always called young women "sis."
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Originally, somewhere in season 3 or 4 after Irene Lorenzo's arrival, the writer's started plotting for Irene and Archie to have an affair. They eventually decided this plot twist was too outrageous; too much a betrayal of their characters; so they tabled that idea temporarily anyway. The idea was re-hatched and reworked later as season seven's multi-episode premiere "Archie's Brief Encounter", when Archie has a (near) affair with a lady he met at the bar; causing a temporary rift in Edith and Archie's relationship.
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Edith Bunker died in 1980.
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The US version of Johnny Speight's hit UK TV series, Till Death Us Do Part (1965).
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Some of Archie's portrayed bigotry and epithets were directed toward the Irish and Catholics. In real life Carroll O'Connor was Irish American and Catholic.
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Just like Archie used to fake killing himself-as a joke-when Edith would blather endlessly in some boring story, Maude would do the same thing. In the episode "Maude's Revolt", Maude fakes killing herself as her husband blathers on to the men at her birthday party, as a way of teasing him too. After Edith passed away Archie would tease Stephanie the same way.
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Rob Reiner was on All in the Family and Archie Bunker's Place. Corey Feldman was on Gloria, the All in the Family spinoff. Reiner would go on to hire Feldman for his big 1986 coming of age flick, Stand By Me. Rob Reiner's wife, Penny Marshall, would co-star on Laverne and Shirley with Michael McKean for several years; her playing Laverne, him playing Laverne's sidekick and neighbor pest Lenny. Reiner would hire McKean to star in Spinal Tap. Harry Shearer would also make a guest appearance on Laverne and Shirley; and he would also star in Spinal Tap. Christopher Guest would guest star on All in the Family, then star on Saturday Night Live as a featured player for a few years. Reiner and Penny Marshall would hang out with the SNL cast and party with them in the early days, which is where Reiner met Guest. And Billy Crystal was Rob Reiner's best friend, who had already made an appearance on All in the Family; so it makes sense that he would cast him in Princess Bride; and as the lead in when Harry Met Sally. Rob Reiner's adoptive daughter Tracy Reiner, (who is Penny Marshall's biological daughter), was cast as Allison's friend in Sure Thing. And Rob Reiner's mother, Estelle Reiner, wife of Carl Reiner, creator of the Dick Van Dyke Show, was the lady in the diner in When Harry Met Sally who said the famous line, "I'll have what she's having."
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Archie's favorite tabloid was The National Enquirer.
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Both Sally Struthers and Danielle Brisebois were in the Broadway production of "Annie" (at different times). Danielle played Molly, and Sally played Miss Hannigan.
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When CBS decided to spinoff Gloria from Archie Bunker's Place Carroll O'Connor and his godson and business partner Joseph Gannon produced the pilot with his production company Ugo Productions. Unfortunately, CBS hated the pilot, and they promptly fired O'Connor, his godson, and Ugo Productions from the project, and brought in new producers to take over and shoot a new pilot. O'Connor was very angry at the network, and especially angry at Sally Struthers for not standing up for him when this happened. He publicly said he would not appear on "Gloria" in the Archie Bunker role, and he did not.
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Sally Struthers spoke out recently about the Live All In the Family reboot. She said she is dead set against it: ""Why? What is the point? It's a classic. All in the Family came at a moment in time that somehow turned out to be the perfect moment to put something that 'quote-unquote' radical on TV, and it was the perfect cast. We had the perfect writers." Struthers went on to say that no one was going to replicate the performances of Carroll O'Connor:""Nobody is going to be Carroll O'Connor. Nobody but nobody is going to be another Jean Stapleton. And I honestly don't see the point." She went on to insist that Norman Lear just retire: "Norman Lear is in his 90s," Struthers said. "I think he should just have fun and travel, and stop trying to make another mark on TV. He's made enough marks." Her onscreen husband, Rob Reiner, was supportive of the project however, and helped Lear chose cast members as well as episodes to showcase. Marla Gibbs, original cast member from the Jeffersons, actually made a cameo on the Jeffersons reboot. (Gibbs is the only cast member from either All in the Family or The Jeffersons to come back).
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Scott Brady was offered the part of Archie Bunker and even though he turned it down, he later appeared as a different character.
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The only sitcom in the history of television to address anti-catholic prejudice.
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Vincent Gardenia plays both Jim Bowman, the Bunkers' next-door neighbor who sells his house to the Jeffersons, later as Frank Lorenzo, the Bunkers' new next-door neighbor who buys the Wiedemayers' house. In-between, he appeared alongside Rue McClanahan as a swinger couple, Ruth and Curtis Rempley, whom Edith invites over to the house naïvely thinking they were lonely and needed friends.
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Rob Reiner appeared in an episode of The Odd Couple (1970) as Sheldon, the husband to Myrna Turner (Penny Marshall). This was in 1974 when he was still starring as Michael Stivic. He was married to Penny Marshall in real life at the time.
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Betty Garrett and Sally Struthers were very close friends in real life, in spite of their age differences.
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The Draft Dodger episode aired in 1978 right about the time the Mandatory service laws for young men in this country were being disbanded; so this episode was timely; not just in terms of its pertinence to the Vietnam War; but for general service requirements in this country.
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The Bunker home was also used for interior shots in The Carmichael Show.
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Seth MacFarlane clearly used Archie and Edith as the inspiration for Peter and Lois in his show Family Guy (1999), Peter even wearing the same wardrobe. That's ironic because Alfe and Else on Till Death Do Us Part were the prototypes for Archie and Edith. And then of course the Bickersons were the prototype for Alfe and Else; and then Punch and Judy were prototypes for the Bickersons; and so on.
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"All in the Family" was not without its critics, which included Bill Cosby and Dr. Alvin F. Poussaint, noted psychologist who was a consultant on The Cosby Show (1984). In their view, the show made racism a laughing matter, and thus encouraged an acceptance, by blacks and whites alike, of bigotry.
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The series spent five consecutive years at number one in the Nielsen ratings. The only other shows to do this were The Cosby Show (1984) and American Idol (2002). After the fifth year at #1, the network bounced the show around several different nights and time slots (taking the place of other CBS programs that were getting beat by the competition), causing All in the Family to lose some of its momentum, never again rising to #1.
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On the strength of her success on Broadway Sada Thompson was initially signed to play neighbor Irene Lorenzo on All in the Family. After taping her first episode, however, she was replaced by Betty Garrett, when it became obvious that she and producer Norman Lear had different opinions about how the character should be played. The Sada Thompson episode never aired. Sada Thompson went on later that year to be cast as Katherine Lawrence in Family (1976) (a similarly groundbreaking 1970s family drama).
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For the 1971-1972 season Sally Struthers was starring on two shows. All in the Family where she played Gloria and The Pebbles and Bamm-Bamm Show (1971) where she starred as Pebbles Flintstone.
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Jean Stapleton did not use her trademark high voice when the show started. If you watch the pilot, up until about the episode titled Edith Has Jury Duty (the ninth episode of the first season), Stapleton's voice is relatively low. It is after this that her voice starts going up, eventually becoming the soprano shriek we all know and love by the end of the first season. Jean Stapleton admitted she experimented with the voice during the first season, and eventually used the voice that she used for her character in Damn Yankees.
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In the original 1968 pilot episode an additional verse was sung:

Had my twelve-tube radio Loved The Eddie Cantor Show Oh where did all that beauty go? Those were the days.
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Gloria always calls Mike "Michael". Edith calls him "MIke". And Archie calls him "Meathead". In a couple rare episodes he does call him "Mike". Mike calls Archie "Arch", Edith calls him "Archie", Gloria calls him "Daddy". Both Gloria and Mike call Edith "Ma"; Archie calls her "Edith". Mike and Edith call Gloria "Gloria"; Archie always calls her "Little Girl."
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When CBS cancelled Archie Bunker's Place, Norman Lear publicly said this was sad, but also that he never really wanted the spinoff to be produced in the first place; he would have preferred if the whole thing had ended in 1979 with the end of All in the Family. He had intended the show to end after season eight when the Stivics moved to California. It was the network that wanted the show to continue, and then Carroll O'Connor who wanted to do "Archie Bunker's Place".
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The lyrics to the theme song (which were sometimes misheard by the audience and are actually a truncated version of a longer song) are as follows:

Boy the way Glen Miller played, Songs that made the hit parade, Guys like us we had it made, Those were the days.

And you know where you were then, Girls were girls and men were men. Mister we could use a man like Herbert Hoover again. Didn't need no welfare state, Everybody pulled his weight, Gee our old LaSalle ran great, Those were the days.
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The first gay character to appear on a sitcom ever was Steve in 1971's All in the Family: Judging Books by Covers (1971) episode, guest starring Philip Carey. Although they never use the word "gay" in the episode. Archie just uses the anti-gay epithets "queer", "fairy" and "fag"; (and Edith uses the epithets "pansy" and "flower");and actually Mike and the other characters don't say anything directly, although Mike says that Archie's friend Steve could "fly around the room". (This is an antiquated homophobic joke about gay people that was commonly made in the 70s, 60s and before then; meaning the gay person was a "fairy"; which is another old anti-gay epithet). And Kelsey makes an oblique reference about Steve not "camping it up like some of the others". But no one actually uses the word "gay" or "homosexual"; just oblique references and epithets; the audience has to fill in the subtext. (And Archie's "queer" comments were considered anti-gay epithets back in 1971 when the episode aired. "Queer" did not become legitimized as a mainstream word for the gay community until the 90s) The first time a legitimate word was used to describe a gay character on any sitcom was on The Mary Tyler Moore Show's 1973 episode My Brother's Keeper; Rhoda uses it to describe Phyllis' brother who is gay. The first time it was used on tv was in the 70s PBS series "An American Family"; and on the networks in 1972s made for tv movie "That Certain Summer".
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Danielle Brisebois played Archie's niece, Stephanie Mills. Ironically, Stephanie Mills was a popular African American actress who was starring in The Wiz during this period (this is probably what the character was named after).
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In 1971 when he was starring on "All in the Family" Rob Reiner guest starred on The Partridge Family (1970) as Snake, a motorcycle-riding beatnik hippy type who dates Laurie.
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Reenacted 48 years later on ABC's "Live in Front of a Studio Audience: Norman Lear's All in the Family."
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Its depiction, plot, relatives and elements would later inspire "Roseanne" (1988-1997; 2018)
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The subtitle for the famous All in the Family: Sammy's Visit (1972) episode; where Sammy Davis Jr. meets the Bunkers, is "Sammy Takes Bunker Hill." They use the "Bunker Hill" again for another episode in the sequel series Archie Bunker's Place. Apparently the writers couldn't resist making that pun! They also brought back Sammy Davis Junior for an episode in the sequel series also!
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Rob Reiner has said that his primary and preferred career goals were in writing and directing as opposed to acting, and auditioned for and accepted a role on the series believing it would only be a temporary gig. Reiner believed that the show's content would prove to be too "out there" for American Television audiences, resulting in the show not lasting beyond its first season.
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Mike and Gloria kiss on almost every episode. This may have been awkward for the actors as they reportedly didn't get along.
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Rob Reiner had previously played a college student protester on an eighth season episode of The Beverly Hillbillies ("The Hills of Home" (1969)), one of the first times the word "honky" was used on a sitcom.
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Allan Melvin played Barney Hefner, Archie Bunker's bigoted lodge brother buddy on All in the Family, and Sam Franklin, Alice Nelson's butcher boyfriend on The Brady Bunch (1969), during the same time (1972-1974).
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Though Carroll O'Connor appeared older than Jean Stapleton on this show, Jean was actually older than Carroll by more than a year. In fact, in the majority of Norman Lear sitcoms, the wife in real life was older than the actor who played her husband.
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Ironically Rob Reiner was not Polish but Jewish, an even more persecuted minority in America.
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Archie frequently referred to advice columnist Abigail Van Buren, also known as "Dear Abby," as "Dear Ay-bee."
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James Cromwell played the recurring role of Stretch Cunningham on All In the Family. Stretch was an employee at Pendegast Tool and Die, where Archie (and later Irene Lorenzo, among others seen in the show) worked, under the leadership of foreman Archie. After All in the Family wrapped Cromwell would go on to star as farmer Arthur Hoggett in Babe, then Babe Pig in the City. Incidentally, due to frequent clashes about the script and money with show star Carroll O'Connor; Norman Lear was, amazingly, thinking about killing off Archie, and replacing Stretch Cunningham as the star of the show! This would have happened during the three episode "Where's Archie" story arc; in which Stretch Cunningham makes his first appearance in. There were other times during the show's production when Lear was seriously considering killing off Archie as well. Ironically, never Lear never did kill off Archie, but he did kill off Edith, reluctantly, during Archie Bunker's Place, as Jean Stapleton was losing interest in playing the character.
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Both George Jefferson and Archie Bunker accidentally went to Ku Klux Klan meetings.
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A running gag on this show was that Edith would tell long shaggy dog stories; blathering on forever; and Archie; sitting in the other chair at the table, listening, would then pretend to kill himself; as if the story was so boring he had no other choice. After Edith passed away Archie would repeat the gag with his neice Stephanie when she too was telling a run-on story. Maude would also repeat the gag with Arthur when he was telling a run on story on Maude.
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Season 12 episode 10 sees Stephanie going to her first dance with a young man named Larry. In the episode Larry tries to sit in Archie's chair; and Archie shouts "get out of there little meathead."
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Although Lionel Jefferson (played by Mike Evans) had been appearing on the show since the first episode, the whole Jefferson family was soon brought in as Archie's next door neighbors, and nemeses, in Season 1 Episode 8 "Lionel Moves Into the Neighborhood". Isabel Sanford was cast immediately as Louise, but Sherman Hemsley was enjoined from making any appearances as the patriarch George while he was still starring in Purlie on Broadway. So Mel Stewart was brought in as George's brother, Henry. Stewart was essentially a place holder for Hemsley in seasons 1-3. Once Hemsley finished his run in Purlie in Season 4, Stewart was transitioned off the show, and Hemsley was transitioned in, during the "Henry's Farewell" episode in Season 4 episode 3. There's a rumor though that the Henry Jefferson character was retconned off the show and out of the whole Norman Lear franchise at that point; and that isn't true. Isabel Sanford perpetuated the rumor in an Emmy TV Legends Interview when she said that the "Henry Jefferson character was taken off the show at that point and kind of never mentioned again". This is false though, as Henry Jefferson was mentioned in later Jeffersons episodes. One substantial example would be the Season 4 Episode 22 "Uncle George and Aunt Louise," which has Henry's bratty son Raymond (who was never mentioned or seen previously) played by Gary Coleman, coming to stay with the Jeffersons for six weeks. George even gets on the phone and talks to Henry for a few minutes. So although Mel Stewart might have vanished from the series at that point Henry Jefferson did not.
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People forget Lionel was the first Jefferson, not Louise. Lionel (Mike Evans) appears in the very first episode even before Archie does as a matter of fact! (and even appears on the flashback episode involving the Stivics' wedding). Louise/Isabel Sanford does not appear until Season 1 Episode 8 "Lionel Moves Into The Neighborhood". And George/Sherman Hemsley doesn't debut until Season 4 episode 3 "Henry's Farewell". People kind of assume that Louise was the spinoff character but that isn't actually the case.
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Bea Arthur only appears for 13 minutes on the "Cousin Maude's Visit" episode, but Arthur was so stunning in those 13 minutes that a whole 6 year tv show was spunoff from that brief period.
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During the first season of the show one line in the lyrics to the theme song seemed unclear to much of the audience. It was later reshot with an emphasis on clear enunciation of the line in question: "Gee, our old LaSalle ran great...."
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Jean Stapleton is the only actress to appear in almost every single episode, more than anyone else, missing only 4 (205 of the 209 episodes). In second place, Carroll O'Connor is another actor to have appeared in almost each and every episode of the series, with the exception of 7 (and several in the fourth season, due to a contract dispute with Norman Lear, giving him a total of 202 of the 209 episodes).
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Mike Evans who played Lionel Jefferson married someone in real life with the sirname Jefferson.
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During an interview with Carroll O'Connor, Roseanne said that she based her character on a female version of Archie Bunker. Coincidentally, Estelle Parsons (who plays Roseanne's mother Beverly), had a recurring role on the 9th season of All In The Family.
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Roseanne the TV sitcom has been frequently compared to All in the Family. Roseanne Barr herself describes the character as a female Archie Bunker (whose street address is also 704). Isabel Sanford and Estelle Parsons were on both All in the Family and Roseanne.
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According to recent reports Norman Lear is planning reboots of All in the Family, Maude, Good Times and The Jeffersons; all the spinoff shows in his All in the Family Franchise; with new A-List actors. (Kind of like he rebooted One Day at a Time with Rita Moreno.)
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Cheers star Woody Harrelson returned to the small screen on 5/23/2019 to play Archie in ABC's live, 90 minute, special reboot of All in the Family. This performance would be the first time Woody Harrelson returned to the small screen in a sitcom since he appeared as the character Woody 25 years earlier on a guest spot on Frasier.
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Stephanie Mills, Edith's neice, and the daughter of her cousin Floyd, shares the same last name as Louise Jefferson, whose maiden name was also Mills. Maybe Edith and Louise are actually related!
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For some reason Mike never brings up his Catholicism to Irene Lorenzo, practicing Catholic, when he meets her. He never even brings it up when Archie clashes with Irene about her Catholicism, even though Mike loves to fight with Archie about religion. This might be because at the start of the series it is made clear that Mike is an avowed agnostic, even though it is also made clear throughout the series that he was raised Catholic and eventually abandoned this belief system. In the Flashback-Mike and Gloria's Wedding episode Mike's Uncle Casimir shows up to the proceedings and tries to pressure both the Stivics and the Bunkers to have a Catholic Wedding, since he says this is how Mike was raised.
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Two main characters on this show had to have emergency appendectomies. Mike and Stephanie.
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Henry Fonda, Martin Balsam, and Estelle Parsons are the only actors who have been on this show that have won an Oscar. Henry Fonda hosted a special two part (originally one hour) retrospective called "The Best of All in the Family" in 1974; he would later win the Oscar in 1981 playing Norman Thayer in "On Golden Pond". Martin Balsam won the Oscar before he came to the show in 1966 for Best Supporting actor playing Arnold Burns in "A Thousand Clowns"; he would join the regular cast of "Archie Bunker's Place" as Murray Klein, Archie's business partner at Kelsey's Bar, and then Archie Bunker's Place. Balsam was part of the regular cast from 1979-1981. Estelle Parsons won the Best Supporting Actress Award as Blanche Barrow on 1967's "Bonnie and Clyde"; she guest-starred on season seven's "Archie's Secret Passion" as an old classmate of Archie's, then played the recurring role of Blanche Hefner on season nine. Also in the spin-off Archie Bunker's Place (1979), Oscar winner Celeste Holm plays the recurring role of Stephanie's grandmother Estelle Harris. Holm won the Oscar for Best Supporting actress in Gentleman's Agreement playing Anne Dettrey, in 1947. Several other people associated with the show have been nominated for Oscars including Norman Lear (the executive producer for All in the Family); Lear was nominated for Best screenplay for 1968s Divorce American Style; Rob Reiner (who played Mike on All in the Family for 8 seasons) who was nominated for best Director and Picture for 1993s A Few Good Men; Burgess Meredith (who appeared in the All in the Family Spinoff Gloria as a doctor Gloria worked for); Meredith was nominated twice in the 70s, once in 1976 as an actor in Day of the Locust and once in 1977 as Sylvester Stallone's trainer in Rocky; and Danielle Brisebois (who played Achie's niece Stephanie Mills from 1978 to 1983) was also nominated for an Oscar; and that would be for songwriting, for the Oscar nominated theme song of the 2013 movie Begin Again; "Lost in the Stars." And James Cromwell who played the recurring role if Archie's longtime BFF and Pendegrast Tool and Die Co-worker Stretch Cunningham would get an Oscar nomination for playing the farmer in 1996s Babe.
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The only Oscar winners on this show are Martin Balsam, Henry Fonda, and Estelle Parsons. Celeste Holm, who is a recurring character on Archie Bunker's Place (1979), also won an Oscar.
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Three stars from the original "Annie" on Broadway made their way to the sitcom world in the late 1970s and early 1980s. "Annie" star Andrea McArdle, the original Annie, was playing Doris Horshack, Arnold's sister, on Welcome Back, Kotter (1975); Danielle Brisebois, who played Molly alongside Andrea McArdle in the original Annie, was starring as Archie Bunker's niece; Stephanie Mills, on All in the Family, during this period. And Molly Ringwald; who starred in the late 70s road company production of "Annie" in Los Angeles, was starring as Molly on The Facts of Life (1979). Dorothy Loudon, the original Broadway stage Miss Hannigan, also got her own sitcom during this period, but it was quickly canceled.
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Burt Mustin and Allan Melvin both appeared on The Brady Bunch (1969) and All in the Family in the 70s.
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This is a reboot of a British sitcom called Till Death Us Do Part; which ran from 1965-1975; also about a conservative bigotted working class man living with his wife; daughter and son and law, and the daily battles that ensue. In the original show the main character's name was Alf Garnett; his wife's name was Else; his daughter was Rita; and her husband's name was Mike; just like it was in the remake; but the last name is Rawlins now; not Stivic; and he's a socialist, not just a liberal activist like Mike on All in the Family. It's interesting to note that both shows ran concurrently from 1971 to 1975; and both were very successful; but; as is often the case; the American spinoff was much more famous internationally and had a much bigger impact on American culture; changing the landscape of television as it did. Just as Archie Bunker became a catch phrase and a household name in American culture; Alf Garnett became an icon in British culture as well.
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In an episode of Happy Days, Joanie's First Kiss, Richie shows Joanie a maneuver he does on girls at the drive in, as a way of warning her about boyfriends who might be aggressive on a date. Richie demonstrates that he reaches out; pretending to be stretching; at which point he suddenly puts his arm around the girl. Then he says, "they don't call me Stretch Cunningham for nothing!" This line is a nod to the Stretch Cunningham character on All in the Family; one of Archie's best friends from Pendergrast Tool and Dye; played by James Cromwell; who's a recurring character on All in the Family.
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An original idea had Archie teaming up with Irene Lorenzo and having an affair; but the writers then scuttled that idea; considering it was too far fetched to see these enemies hooking up together, even for an episode. But they did not drop the having an affair idea; as this was developed in Archie's Brief Encounter: Parts 1 & 2 ; when Archie kisses a woman he meets, Denise; Edith figures it out; and a conflict develops between the two.
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The stars of All in the Family, and it's two spinoffs, Maude and the Jeffersons; would all win Emmies. Carroll O'connor, Jean Stapleton, Rob Reiner and Sally Strothers all won emmies for their work on that show (which is a rarity in television, that's only happened a few other times, on Golden Girls, Will and Grace, the Odd Couple; when all the leads won an Emmy). Also Isabel Sanford won an Emmy for her work on the Jeffersons, and Bea Arthur won an Emmy for her work on Maude. Esther Rolle would win an Emmy; but not for her work on Good Times, for her work on "The Summer of My German Soldier."
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Black Elmo, Stretch Cunningham, the Reverend Felcher, and Sybill Gooley were all off screen supporting characters that were frequently mentioned, but rarely seen, during the series.
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They did the Mike and Archie get stuck while walking through the door joke on several episodes. They also did the Archie gets wacked by the kitchen door joke on several episodes. And they did the someone is sitting in Archie's chair and he kicks them out gag in literally almost every episode.
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There was a cartoon version of All in the Family which features all dogs and aired in 1972 (called The Barkley's). Amazingly, the Honeymooners, (Flintstones), Rhoda, (Carlton Your Doorman), Charlie's Angels, (Captain Caveman and the Teenangels), Dobie Gillis (Scooby Doo), That Girl, (That Girl in Wonderland), Star Trek, (Star Trek the Animated Series), Lost in Space, (Lost in Space Animated Special), MASH, (MUSH), The Brady Bunch, (The Brady Kids), the Partridge Family, (Partridge Family 2200 AD), Nanny and the Professor, (Nanny and the Professor and the Phantom of the Circus), the Munsters, (the Mini-Munsters), Roseanne (Little Rosie), One Day At A Time, (One Day At a Time Animated episode), Good Times (Good Times the Animated Series), Happy Days (Fonz and the Happy Days Gang), Mork and Mindy, (Mork and Mindy), Laverne and Shirley (Laverne and Shirley in The Army Now) and I Dream of Jeannie (Jeannie) have all had animated versions.
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Sammy Davis Junior making an appearance was no big event. He had already done cameos on Beverly Hillbillies, Patty Duke Show, I Dream of Jeannie, the Rifleman and Here's Lucy. What made this episode memorable was that Archie's prejudices shown through while thinking he was being respectful to Sammy and even joked to him about his glass eye, and then Sammy wound up kissing racist Archie. Beyond that it's just another one of his myriad self-portraying television appearances which he did on tv shows every couple years throughout his career.
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In "Archie in Lock Up" (1972) Archie meets a young preacher in jail who is playing the "Jesus Christ Superstar" theme song on his radio; and the prisoners are actually bowing and kneeling and acting as if it was a religious hymn of some sort; and not the theme to a sacreligious Broadway show.
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All 4 leads get hit by eachother during the run of the show. Gloria slaps Mike in one episode when he tries to forcibly carry her upstairs. She also physically assaults him in the "Vasectomy" episode. She also slaps him in the "California Here We Are Part 1" episode after Mike calls her "brainless" and "fat". Edith hits Archie in two episodes - once in the face when she finds out he's been gambling and once on the wrist ("We're Still Having a Heat Wave"). Gloria swats Archie on the head in more than one episode (Archie: "She's been doin that to me since she was three!"). Edith slaps Gloria in the "Edith's 50th Birthday Episode" after Gloria goads her out of her fearfullness and depression by yelling at her and telling her she's not her mother. And Gloria slaps Edith on the cheek to revive her after Edith starts to faint in the "California Here We Are Episode 2"; after Gloria reveals she's been having an affair. So all 4 characters get slapped; and while the women both slap people the men do not. Gloria is the most physically abusive; having hit Mike twice; swatting her mother on the cheek to revive her when she faints; and hitting Archie numerous times on the head and pulling strands of his hair out in numerous episodes. Next would be Edith who hits her husband and her daughter. We also see Edith hit her assailant in the face with a burning hot cake pan; she knees him in the groin and pushes him out the door, all in the "Edith's 50th Birthday Episode"; but since this is a self-defensive response to an assault in the "Edith's 50th Birthday" Episode it can hardly be called abuse. Edith is hit the least on the show, Archie is hit and or physically punished the most; he is swatted by his daughter on the head in numerous episodes; and Edith hits him twice. Cousin Maude also stomps on Archie's foot for ruining her daughter Carol's wedding in the Season two opener "Maude". Archie also gets punched by his friend Steve in the "Books by their Covers" episode after Archie confronts him about being gay. All four characters are also assaulted or fend off attempted assaults from criminals, usually offscreen, during the series. Both Edith and Gloria fend off rape attempts, at different points, from sex offenders during the series. Mike is mugged at one point, in an attack which leaves him hospitalized and Beverly LaSalle dead. And Archie fends off an attack from an armed robber in his cab. All four family members are held up at gunpoint by criminals in one episode; and in the "Archie is Branded" episode all four family members witness a vigilante character named Paul getting blown up in a car outside their house.
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The poem Edith is recititing in the "Longest Kiss" episode goes like this; Ladybug ladybug fly away home, Your house in on fire and your children are gone, All except one and that's little Ann, For she crept under the frying pan.
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Despite encountering money troubles from time to time Norman Lear portrayed the Bunkers as solidly lower middle class. The Bunkers owned their own home, Archie was the foreman on the loading dock where he worked and picked up extra money moonlighting as a cab driver and later on would see greater financial success by owning his own bar. This was in stark contrast to their British counterparts Alf and Else Garnett, who despite working hard, were always portrayed as living in poverty.
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In the early '70s, Atlantic Records released a pair of hilarious All in the Family LPs, containing excerpts from the episodes. Also the paperbacks "The Wit and Wisdom of Archie Bunker" and "God, Man, and Archie Bunker" (which contains a foreword by Carroll O'Connor) were released around the same time.
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The October 2nd episode from 1971, Archie and the Lockup, was the very first time Andrew Lloyd Weber's Jesus Christ Superstar was performed as part of any kind of a show or performance. It happens when Archie meets the born again hippies in jail, and they are playing Lloyd Weber's song on the radio, singing it and dancing around to it. This episode aired even before the show premiered on Broadway on October 12th of that year.
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ABC's live reboot is a clever way to reboot the series; since an updated version of the series would never fly today ; with the country being so sensitive and PC right now. Since the original episodes have already been seen and loved and enjoyed by most of the American viewing public; they can just re-do them live as "Re-enactments" and avoid the controversy. Indeed the 2019 live renactment did not get any protests or complaints from the viewing public and from the critical community. Some critics complained the reboot was too much of an imitation; and not enough of an original interpretation; but beyond that there have been no claims about racism or the show being un-pc.
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Sammy Davis Junior appeared on All in the Family and two spinoffs; Archie Bunker's Place and The Jeffersons.
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Interestingly Carl Reiner never makes an appearance on this show. Although Reiner's best friend Billy Crystal was added as a recurring character (only actually seen once); and various relatives of Carol Oconnor's were used for the spinoff Gloria. Also Rob Reiner's wife, Penny Marshall, auditioned for and was almost cast as Gloria alongside husband Rob Reiner.
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Archie called Edith "Dingbat"; he ordered her to get him beers all the time; and was constantly telling her to answer the door. He constantly told her to "stifle!" And he was also always telling her and the rest of the family "case closed!" After Edith passed away he called Stephanie his niece "daffy" and told her to get him beers all the time; as well as barking at her to answer the door all the time. He never told her to "stifle" but he told her to "shut up please" and he always told her "case closed" to end any argument. He did this to his other niece Billie too.
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Yvonne Wilder, who played Katherine Logan, Archie's girlfriend after Edith passes away, also starred in West Side Story as Consuelo, Anita's best friend.
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During their interviews for the Archive of American Television and Radio, both writers Bob Schiller and Bob Weiskopf admitted that Carroll O'Connor was very egotistical and demanding to work with. Although the two respected O'Connor's acting and writing talents, which they said were superb, the two believed O'Connor was very manipulative. The two cited O'Connor's many walk outs and arguments with Norman Lear and CBS as disruptive ploys to garner a huger salary. The two also claimed that O'Connor's ultimate goal was to have full control of the show and the lions share of the air time and profits. Indeed it was reported that O'Connor did not agree to return for a ninth season in 1978 until after Sally Struthers and Rob Reiner had already committed themselves to other projects. Also they believed it was O'Connor who demanded the live studio audience be abandon during the ninth season of the show and for the entire run of Archie Bunker's Place. Less a few episodes when a live audience was brought in, most of these episodes were played to a studio audience, after being taped, for live responses. Abandoning the audience gave O'Connor more leverage to rewrite scripts he did not like up until the taping of the show. Ultimately the two also believed O'Connor was the reason why Jean Stapleton ultimately decided not to return to the series for its eleventh season in 1980. Stapleton had a reduced role during the first season of Archie Bunkers Place. Stapleton had agreed to return for its second season in a continued reduced role but O'Connor nixed that idea to expand the series storylines. Schiller and Weiskopf felt that O'Connor, who was now producing Archie Bunker's Place, was indifferent about courting Stapleton to stay and did not offer her any perks like a larger salary or points in the show, stuff that could of ensured Stapleton return full time to the series. Both writers felt that with the other actors and producers out of the way this would give O'Connor not only the creative control he had desired for years but also the lions share of the series money. Indeed in 1980 O'Connor would become televisions highest paid actor earning $250,000 and episode plus ten percent ownership in the series. These attributes are what apparently led to both Martin Balsam and Anne Meara leaving the show after its second and third seasons respectively. O'Connor's demanding ways ultimately led CBS head Bill Paley to canceling the show unexpectedly after its fourth season wrapped in 1983.
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Teresa Betancourt obviously did not score well with audiences, since she was taken off the show after only a half season (although Teresa originally took the Stivics' room for only a month, but stayed for several). This is compared to Maude who was on the show for one brief episode and she was so explosive she scored her own series! Or Stephanie who was brought in for a few episodes during the last season to fill the void left by Mike and Gloria; and she wound up being a co-star and regular on the show for almost 5 years (after becoming a favorite of pre-adolescent males - O'Connor quoting in a TV Guide article at the time that the character of Stephanie saved his show from an earlier near-cancelation). Or Allan Melvin who was brought in on a one-off in season 2 ("Sammy's Visit") as Archie's lodge buddy Barnie, who wound up staying on the show and it's spinoff for 13 years!
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While waiting for the series to be picked up after filming the two pilots for ABC, Norman Lear filmed the Dick Van Dyke movie "Cold Turkey" in 1969 (which remained unreleased until 1971). Cold Turkey, which featured Jean Stapleton, also had many actors who would later appear on this series.
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In the spinoff series Archie Bunker's Place Archie winds up attending a Devo concert! (He is searching for his neice Stephanie that he believes is at the concert). In another episode Stephanie asks Archie if he likes punk rock and early 80s girl group The Go-Gos. Archie replies "I have to Go-Go out of here!" And he leaves the room. It's interesting to see the series make so many pop music references. In the original series the only pop groups and pop music references that were mentioned were Mammas and the Pappas, the Jesus Christ Superstar soundtrack and of course Sammy Davis Junior! (Sammy Davis Junior would pop up in the sequel series as well). Ironically, the actress who played Stephanie, Danielle Brisebois, would later join a rock group called the New Radicals that would release the alternative-grunge classic "You Only Get What You Give" which would hit the Billboard top 30 that year and become a rock standard.
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A commonly recycled trope in sitcoms: A long lost aunt shows up on the scene and tells the parent on the show that she is concerned about the kids' welfare, and she'd like them to come live with her; which leads to a big fight or a courtroom battle. This happens on Archie Bunkers Place when Grandma Harris sues Archie for custody of Stephanie; it also happens in Family Affair; also Gimme a Break; also Alice. Even the movie Kramer vs Kramer has a variation on this plot.
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It's pretty amazing that Rob Reiner did not hire any of his co-stars for film projects after he left All in The Family. Conversely peers Penny Marshall hired many of her LaVerne and Shirley chums after she became a successful director, and so did Ron Howard. But Reiner seemed to have left Sally Struthers (who was desperate for work after Family wrapped, but reportedly Reiner and Struthers often didn't get along while doing the show), Carroll O'Connor and Jean Stapleton behind in the dust, after he hit it big with Spinal Tap and The Sure Thing in 84.
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Ironically Mike's real name was Rob and Lionel's real name was Mike.
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Every sitcom has an episode where the lead character gets locked in a room and the other characters have to save them. Typically this is a thinly veiled excuse to do a flashback episode; an episode where the characters reminisce about funny events from the past while they show rerun clips. In All in the Family it's "Archie in the Cellar.". In Brady Bunch it's "Big Little Man"; in Different Strokes there's two episodes like this; "The Photo Club" and "The Valentine's Day Retrospective". In Family Ties it's "Cold Storage". In I Love Lucy it's "Vacation From Marriage". The Jeffersons had the 90-minute "George and Louise in a Bind". And so on. (Note: "Archie in the Cellar" consisted of all-new material; the only All in the Family episodes to contain previous clips were the two Retrospective episodes, the first hosted by Henry Fonda).
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In the pilot episode Jean Stapleton's voice is low. She's still using her natural voice at this point; not the high squeaky voice we would all get used to later. By the second episode she's adopted the shrill high pitched squeaky voice that was so famous. Also for the first two episodes Edith is somewhat tough and demure and has a negative attitude; and she's somewhat combative with Archie at this point (emulating Else Garnett, the wife of bombastic Alf Garnett of Britain's "Til Death Us Do Part", which was the inspiration for this series). By the third episode she would adopt the docile, giggly, sweet and optimistic but ditzy persona Edith is known for.
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All in the Family is the first of four sitcoms in which all the lead actors (O'Connor, Stapleton, Struthers, and Reiner) won Primetime Emmy Awards. The other three are The Golden Girls (1985), Will & Grace (1998) and Schitt's Creek (2015).
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

After season one of Archie Bunker's Place, the writers confessed that they were having a hard time explaining Edith's frequent absences; the character only appearing in six episodes. Jean Stapleton expressed interest in continuing with the show's second season, but only for another six episodes, and only if her episodes could be taped consecutively. This didn't sit well with the producers. Norman Lear (who was an uncredited consultant on that series) spoke with Jean Stapleton (who was growing weary of the writers portraying Edith as being overly "dingbatty", in Stapleton's opinion, which strengthened her wanting to explore other roles). Jean suggested to Lear that the solution was for the character of Edith to be killed off (Carroll O'Connor agreed with this, believing that Edith was just as important to the show as Archie, and as long as the character were alive, fans would always be wondering where she was due to Jean's infrequent appearances; so having Edith pass away made sense to him), but Lear was against it. She said, "Norman, she's only fiction." After a long pause, Lear finally said, "To me, she isn't." She realized she hurt his feelings. Norman eventually consented.
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