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You think only half the ‘Will & Grace’ cast will get Emmy nominations

You think only half the ‘Will & Grace’ cast will get Emmy nominations
Will and Grace might not make the Emmy cut — as in the characters. In a recent poll asking how many stars of “Will & Grace” will receive nominations for the revival, 36 percent of our readers think only two of them will hear their names announced on July 12.

All four stars, Eric McCormack, Debra Messing, Megan Mullally and Sean Hayes, won Emmys during the show’s original run, making the sitcom one of three shows, after “All in the Family” and “The Golden Girls,” whose whole regular cast won Emmys. Mullally and Hayes were nominated the most — seven times each — and the former is the only one of the cast to win twice. Based on that history, you could presume that they would be the ones to make it if only two get shortlisted. Mullally is in third place in our odds; Hayes, first.

See Emmy predictions: Sean Hayes (‘Will & Grace
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Will & Grace’ would set longest gap between Best Comedy Series Emmy wins

‘Will & Grace’ would set longest gap between Best Comedy Series Emmy wins
The first and only time “Will & Grace” won Best Comedy Series at the Emmys was a full adult ago — 18 years, way back in 2000. The NBC sitcom could pick up a bookend Emmy in September with the revival, which would set a record for the longest gap between Best Comedy Series wins.

Now it goes without saying that this wouldn’t be possible without the revival, and a gap this long is practically unheard of, since most shows don’t run continuously for nearly two decades, let alone receive Emmy recognition for that entire duration. The Emmys like to get into streaks with their favorites and then drop them like a bad habit.

Sixteen shows have won multiple Best Comedy Series and almost all of them did it with consecutive wins. “Frasier” and “Modern Family” both pulled off a five-peat. All six three-time winners — “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “The Phil Silvers Show,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tim O’Connor Dies: Actor Best Known For ‘Peyton Place’ Was 90

Tim O’Connor Dies: Actor Best Known For ‘Peyton Place’ Was 90
Character actor Tim O’Connor, best known for his role as Elliot Carson in 1960s prime time soap Peyton Place, has died. He passed in his sleep on April 5 in his longtime home of Nevada City, California at age 90. O’Connor had a long career on stage and particularly television, where he had appearances in such iconic shows as All in the Family, M*A*S*H, Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, General Hospital, Dynasty, and Star Trek. Born in Chicago, his career spanned Broadway
See full article at Deadline Movie News »

Tim O’Connor Dies: Actor Best Known For ‘Peyton Place’ Was 90

Character actor Tim O’Connor, best known for his role as Elliot Carson in 1960s prime time soap Peyton Place, has died. He passed in his sleep on April 5 in his longtime home of Nevada City, California at age 90. O’Connor had a long career on stage and particularly television, where he had appearances in such iconic shows as All in the Family, M*A*S*H, Gunsmoke, The Twilight Zone, General Hospital, Dynasty, and Star Trek. Born in Chicago, his career spanned Broadway
See full article at Deadline TV »

Tim O'Connor, Star on 'Peyton Place' and 'Buck Rogers,' Dies at 90

Tim O'Connor, Star on 'Peyton Place' and 'Buck Rogers,' Dies at 90
Tim O'Connor, the busy character actor who portrayed Elliot Carson, Mia Farrow's father and Dorothy Malone's husband, on more than 400 episodes of the 1960s ABC primetime soap Peyton Place, has died. He was 90.

O'Connor died April 5 at his home in Nevada City, California, The Union newspaper reported.

O'Connor also starred as Dr. Elias Huer on the 1979-81 NBC sci-fi series Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, starring Gil Gerard, and on a memorable 1975 episode of All in the Family, he guest-starred as a former sweetheart of Edith's (Jean Stapleton) from Scranton, Pennsylvania, who's interested...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Tim O'Connor, Star on 'Peyton Place' and 'Buck Rogers,' Dies at 90

Tim O'Connor, the busy character actor who portrayed Elliot Carson, Mia Farrow's father and Dorothy Malone's husband, on more than 400 episodes of the 1960s ABC primetime soap Peyton Place, has died. He was 90.

O'Connor died April 5 at his home in Nevada City, California, The Union newspaper reported.

O'Connor also starred as Dr. Elias Huer on the 1979-81 NBC sci-fi series Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, starring Gil Gerard, and on a memorable 1975 episode of All in the Family, he guest-starred as a former sweetheart of Edith's (Jean Stapleton) from Scranton, Pennsylvania, who's interested...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - TV News »

How many ‘Will & Grace’ stars will make the Emmy cut? [Poll]

How many ‘Will & Grace’ stars will make the Emmy cut? [Poll]
Will & Grace” is one of three shows — the others being “All in the Family” and “The Golden Girls” — whose entire regular cast has won Emmys. But its four stars, Eric McCormack, Debra Messing, Megan Mullally and Sean Hayes, have very different Emmy resumes that could diverge even more this year with the revival. Will all of them make it back?

Mullally has the best Emmy history of the four. After breaking in and winning Best Comedy Supporting Actress for the second season in 2000 — when the show also won Best Comedy Series — she was nominated for the rest of the sitcom’s original run and took home her second Emmy for the eighth and (then-)final season in 2006. She is the only cast member to have won multiple Emmys for the show. Mullally, who has a stellar episode in “Rosario’s Quinceanera,” is in third place in our odds, behind
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys: Will a show sweep the comedy lead races for the first time in 10 years?

Emmys: Will a show sweep the comedy lead races for the first time in 10 years?
No series has won the Best Comedy Actor and Best Comedy Actress Emmys in the same year since “30 Rock” pulled it off for Alec Baldwin and Tina Fey in 2008. That’s partly due to people like Julia Louis-Dreyfus (“Veep”) and Jim Parsons (“The Big Bang Theory”) dominating without co-stars in the corresponding category. But Louis-Dreyfus is out this year, the Emmys haven’t nominated Parsons since 2014, and we have a few his-and-her contenders in the mix who could bring home double gold.

Black-ish” is the safest bet for lead nominations for Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross; it would be the fourth for the former and the third for the latter. Though Donald Glover (“Atlanta”) and Rachel Brosnahan (“The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel”) are the odds-on favorites, Anderson is in second place and Ross is in third (behind “Mom”’s Allison Janney) — and they both have backers for the win.
See full article at Gold Derby »

John Goodman (‘Roseanne’) could extend a dubious record with an eighth Best Comedy Actor Emmy nomination

Despite seven Best Comedy Actor nominations for playing Dan Conner, John Goodman never took home the Emmy during “Roseanne”’s initial nine-season run. It wasn’t until 2007 that he won his first Emmy for his guest appearance on “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip.” With the return of “Roseanne,” Goodman could finally win for his most famous TV role, but if he suffers yet another loss, he’ll have sole ownership of a title no one wants: most nominations in the category without a single win.

See ‘Roseanne’ revival: Get ready for even more episodes in season 2 of reboot after record ratings for return

Goodman, who is seventh in our predictions, is right now tied with two other unlucky seven-time losers: Hal Linden and Matt LeBlanc. Like Goodman, all of Linden’s nominations were for the same character: the title role on “Barney Miller.” LeBlanc accrued his nominations over two shows,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Emmys 2018: Will Ted Danson (‘The Good Place’) set a new record for the most Best Comedy Actor nominations ever?

Emmys 2018: Will Ted Danson (‘The Good Place’) set a new record for the most Best Comedy Actor nominations ever?
Will Ted Danson set a new Emmy record this year with his starring role in “The Good Place”? If he’s nominated for Best Comedy Actor he’ll break a long-standing tie with Alan Alda and Kelsey Grammer for the most nominations in the history of the category. All three of them have been nominated 11 times, and now Danson is looking for an even dozen.

Alda set the record first, earning 11 straight nominations (1973-1983) for playing Hawkeye in all 11 seasons of “M*A*S*H.” He won twice (1974, 1982). Then came Danson, who achieved the same feat: 11 consecutive bids (1983-1993) as Sam Malone in all 11 seasons of “Cheers.” He also won twice (1990, 1993).

Grammer achieved his record in a slightly different way. He earned his first Comedy Actor nom for playing Dr. Frasier Crane, but in 1992 for “Wings” as a guest star; that year only the Emmys had stipulated that guest performers
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ could be the oldest first-time comedy series Emmy winner

‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ could be the oldest first-time comedy series Emmy winner
“Curb Your Enthusiasm” has a pretty, pretty good chance of making the Best Comedy Series cut. According to our early Emmy odds, Larry David’s brainchild, which returned for Season 9 in October after a six-year hiatus, is safely in in fifth place. A nomination would mark its eighth in the category, having only missed its first year. And if “Curb” finally takes home the gold, it’d go down as the oldest first-time Best Comedy Series champ.

Currently, the record is held by “Barney Miller” (1982) and “Friends” (2002), both of which won their first and only awards for their eighth seasons. Season 8 was also “Barney Miller”‘s last, while “Friends” triumphed for its renaissance year with Rachel’s (Jennifer Aniston) pregnancy. “All in the Family” also won in its eighth season in 1978, but it had nabbed three earlier victories.

See Emmys 2018: Thanks to revivals, this year’s Best Comedy Series
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘One Day at a Time’ renewed for season 3: Netflix says to get ready for more of its acclaimed comedy series

‘One Day at a Time’ renewed for season 3: Netflix says to get ready for more of its acclaimed comedy series
“Get ready for more ‘One Day at a Time.’ Season 3 is coming!” says Netflix’s new video announcing that its critically acclaimed sitcom has been renewed for a third season (watch it above). The series premiered in January 2017 and returned for its second season in January 2018. This renewal on March 26 comes exactly two months after the show premiered its latest batch of episodes.

One Day” is a remake of the classic Norman Lear sitcom about a single mother raising two children that originally ran on CBS from 1975-1984. But the new version is markedly different. It’s still about a single mom with two kids, but in this case she’s a Cuban-American army veteran coping with depression, and her family members are also dealing with issues like immigration, racism and sexual identity. But it’s still got the legendary Lear (best known for “All in the Family”) as an executive producer.
See full article at Gold Derby »

BritBox: A Streaming Service for the Die-Hard Brits Among Us

Alright Anglophiles, welcome to Day 2 of our investigation of streaming services for the lovers of foreign television.

From the opening and the title of the service, you can probably tell BritBox is exactly what it says it is -- TV for those who dig all things British.

Well, not all things. Things brought to you directly from two British networks, BBC and ITV. It's a decent offering unless you happen to love Channel 4. That's for another time!

What sets BritBox apart from other services are its comedies and soap operas.

It's the only streamer to offer Coronation Street, Eastenders, Emmerdale, Casualty and Holby City (my favorite!).

However, they only offer current seasons of each, so if it's your hope to start somewhere in the archives of these shows or catch up on previous series (as they call seasons across the pond) you'll have to find another way to do it.
See full article at TVfanatic »

‘Will & Grace’ at Paleyfest: Cast and creators chat Emmy award-winning series revival, reveal season 3 renewal [Listen]

The cast and creators of NBC’s “Will & Grace” revival gathered for a panel discussion at Paleyfest on Saturday, March 17. Stars Eric McCormack, Debra Messing, Sean Hayes, and Megan Mullally were on hand, as were creators David Kohan and Max Mutchnick and director James Burrows, who has helmed every single episode of the series. The event was moderated by Dan Bucatinsky, who has guest-starred twice on the show (once in 2000 and once in 2018) as a persistent suitor Will can’t seem to get rid of. Listen to their entire 45-minute Q&A above.

Interest in the revival was first piqued by a nine-minute online reunion scene released in 2016 in support of Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. Mullally recalled that upon reading the script she emailed Mutchnick and asked, “Why can’t we just do the show again?” While the video didn’t end up winning the campaign for Clinton,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Rita Moreno (‘One Day at a Time’) poised for Emmy return 31 years after winning Egot

Rita Moreno (‘One Day at a Time’) poised for Emmy return 31 years after winning Egot
Can Rita Moreno make an Emmy comeback for “One Day at a Time” after a 35-year absence from the awards? As the wise-cracking grandmother of a Cuban-American family living in Los Angeles, CA, Moreno has the kind of showy supporting role that brought Emmys to Estelle Getty (“The Golden Girls”), Rhea Perlman (“Cheers”) and Megan Mullally (“Will & Grace”), who could actually return herself this year for that show’s revival. And given that her Netflix series is a reboot of a 1970s sitcom from Norman Lear, whose hit shows “All in the Family,” “Maude,” “Good Times,” “Sanford and Son,” “The Jeffersons,” and “Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman” made him King of the Emmys that decade, it would almost feel like a done deal, right? Well, almost.

The Egot recipient was widely expected to reap a Best Comedy Supporting Actress nomination for the show’s first season in 2017, but was snubbed.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Will & Grace’ revival: Emmy favorite renewed for season 3 and adds to season 2 order before season 1 even finished

‘Will & Grace’ revival: Emmy favorite renewed for season 3 and adds to season 2 order before season 1 even finished
Buoyed by the ratings success of the return of “Will & Grace,” NBC has renewed the sitcom for a third season beginning in the fall of 2019 and upped its order for episodes of this fall’s second season by five episodes to 18. After an 11-year absence, the Emmy-winning comedy starring Eric McCormack, Debra Messing, Sean Hayes and Megan Mullally returned to the Peacock network in September. It has aired 14 of its 16 episodes, with the freshman season finale set for April 5.

To date, the reboot is the highest rated comedy on NBC in eight years. So it was not a huge surprise when NBC entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt made the announcement at the Paleyfest event celebrating the show on March 17. As he explained, “We can’t get enough of ‘Will & Grace’ and 23 more episodes is music to my ears. We’re eternally grateful that Debra, Eric, Sean and Megan feel
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘All in the Family': 1972 Archie Bunker Editorial on Gun Control Is More Relevant Than Ever (Video)

  • The Wrap
We think we’ve just found NRA chief Wayne Lapierre’s favorite episode of “All in the Family.” Way back in 1972, Normal Lear’s patriarchal masterpiece Archie Bunker (Carroll O’Connor) provided a televised editorial rebuttal for the ages. Speaking on behalf of group Guns For Everybody, Bunker was convinced that he had the secret to stopping gunmen from hijacking airplanes — a problem of the time that seems almost quaint by today’s standards. You probably know where we’re going with this. “All you gotta do is arm all your passengers,” Bunker said. “And then your airlines, then they wouldn’t have to search the passengers...
See full article at The Wrap »

It Came From The Tube: Escape (1971)

There aren’t a ton of absolutes in life, but among a laundry list of things I enjoy whilst spinning around the sun, here’s three: Christopher George, private dicks, and mad scientists. And so imagine my delight when I stumbled across Escape (1971), a failed TV pilot about an ex escape artist turned P.I. who investigates, in his words, “the unexplainable.” And while the pilot doesn’t dip its toes too much into the pool of the unusual, it sure feels like that’s the way they were planning to go.

Not picked up by the network and instead broadcast on April 6th as an ABC Movie of the Week, Escape did little to swerve people away from their Hee Haw’s, All in the Family’s and 60 Minutes for the brass to reconsider putting it back on the slab. What a shame; Escape today plays as Bruce Wayne
See full article at DailyDead »

Early Emmy spotlight: ‘One Day at a Time’ season 2 confirms it as one of the best multi-camera sitcoms of the 21st century

  • Gold Derby
Early Emmy spotlight: ‘One Day at a Time’ season 2 confirms it as one of the best multi-camera sitcoms of the 21st century
In the era of peak TV multi-camera sitcoms have largely fallen out of fashion. Shows like “Friends” and “Everybody Loves Raymond” filmed in front of a live studio audience have mostly given way to more cinematic-style single-camera network shows like “Modern Family” and “The Good Place” and cable comedies like “Veep” and “Atlanta.” Nostalgia is bringing some of those old classics back to the airwaves — like “Will and Grace,” “Roseanne” and “Murphy Brown” — but you don’t need to go back in time for an award-worthy multi-cam series. There’s a relatively new one on Netflix right now, “One Day at a Time,” whose second season premiered on January 26. It was mostly overlooked by the Emmys in 2017, but season two is even better, and voters have plenty of “Time” to get caught up before voting in a few months.

Okay, so “One Day at a Time” is also kind of a throwback.
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Mom’ Team Reflects on Centering a Sitcom on Women in Recovery

‘Mom’ Team Reflects on Centering a Sitcom on Women in Recovery
In 2012, Chuck Lorre was already the king of the CBS sitcom, serving as executive producer and showrunner on three Warner Bros.-produced multicams (“Two and a Half Men,” “Mike & Molly” and “The Big Bang Theory”). But then he added a fourth in “Mom,” a dark comedy he co-created with Eddie Gorodetsky and Gemma Baker. Mom” was a bit of a departure from Lorre’s recent work due to its roots in the serious subject of addiction — not exactly a topic that easily lends itself to humor. Lorre made that tonal shift clear from the pilot — likening the saga of mother-daughter duo Bonnie and Christy Plunkett (played by Allison Janney and Anna Faris, respectively) to the “second chance” story he did years before with “Grace Under Fire,” a comedy-drama hybrid influenced by the sitcoms of Norman Lear and the “All in the Family” era.

“It’s a life-and-death matter, and there’s always the [concern over] treating it with
See full article at Variety - TV News »
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