Zabriskie Point (1970) - News Poster

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The 18 Best Movie Moments from 2018

A while back, struggling with the frustrating task of year-end list-making, I jotted down a top ten of the scenes I enjoyed the most from the year. Scenes, not films–for as the task soon made clear, the alternative ranking did not necessarily reflect the top ten features I had begun curating way too early for its own good. The list expanded, and eventually turned into a tradition of sorts: a means to patch together, remember and celebrate some of the year’s best moments in film. Minor spoilers abound, and there’s no guarantee as to whether the order will stay the same after subsequent viewings. But at the time of writing, these are the 18 moments from 2018 I will be treasuring in the months and years to come, and here’s to a 2019 blessed with new great films, and plenty more scenes to marvel at.

18. “Does it matter?” in
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Other Side of the Wind’ Review: All’s Welles That Ends Welles

‘The Other Side of the Wind’ Review: All’s Welles That Ends Welles
The director, who died of a heart attack in 1985 at age 70, filmed The Other Side of the Wind between 1970 and 1976, gathering over 100 hours of footage that was never close to being fully assembled … until now. With funding from Netflix, we now have a 124-minute feature that still feels tantalizingly unfinished, though editor Bob Murawski and his expert team worked from Welles’ annotated script. It is clearly a labor of love for everyone involved in this rescue mission. (You can find the fascinating tale of how the film was pieced together
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Why ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ Is a New Way to See Orson Welles

  • Indiewire
Why ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ Is a New Way to See Orson Welles
The following essay was produced as part of the 2018 Nyff Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 56th edition of the New York Film Festival.

Orson Welles’ long-incomplete film “The Other Side of the Wind” has been a topic of fascination and intrigue for decades, billed as Welles’ final feature, and one that, like other projects before it (including “Moby Dick” and “Don Quixote”), had consistently been deemed unfinished. But after years of work from trusted collaborators following Welles’ death in 1985, “The Other Side of the Wind” is now complete, soon to be distributed on the streaming service platform Netflix, and has already made the festival rounds from Venice to Telluride to the recent New York Film Festival.

Beyond Welles acolytes, the film is also of interest because of its interwoven content and form, and a conceit that sees various cameramen following an older,
See full article at Indiewire »

‘They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead’ Film Review: Morgan Neville’s Orson Welles Doc Is Cineaste Catnip

  • The Wrap
‘They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead’ Film Review: Morgan Neville’s Orson Welles Doc Is Cineaste Catnip
With his Vidal-Buckley documentary “Best of Enemies” and this year’s smash hit about Fred Rogers, “Won’t You Be My Neighbor,” filmmaker Morgan Neville has proven himself a keenly sensitive, artful showman when surveying a career through archival footage and fresh interviews. He knows how to re-light the flame of a life, and that’s quickly apparent in his deeply entertaining and illuminating Orson Welles documentary “They’ll Love Me When I’m Dead.”

With impish respect, it chronicles the tortuous journey of Welles’ most notoriously unfinished-in-his-lifetime last movie, “The Other Side of the Wind.”

For cinephiles, it’s a high-calorie, clip-and-interview-laden feast of biography, insight, and gossip. Add to that the bonus that — unlike the dashed promise felt after absorbing “Jorodorwsky’s Dune” that the cinema gods were robbed — in this case there’s a finally completed “Wind,” assembled in recent years, also going out through Netflix. to
See full article at The Wrap »

Peter Bart: Can Superb Ted Kennedy Exposé ‘Chappaquiddick’ Survive Fact-Based Movie Malaise?

Peter Bart: Can Superb Ted Kennedy Exposé ‘Chappaquiddick’ Survive Fact-Based Movie Malaise?
There’s a powerful scene in the newly released film Chappaquiddick in which an exasperated, wheelchair-bound Joe Kennedy fiercely slaps his son, Ted. The monomaniacal old man is in a rage that Senator Ted, groomed to be the next Kennedy president, now faces ruin for driving his car off a bridge, thus drowning a young girl.

The question is, how many filmgoers will witness this riveting moment; as with most mid-budget dramatic films, Chappaquiddick, though superbly crafted, will battle it out this weekend with John Krasinski’s potential genre sleeper A Quiet Place, the racy comedy Blockers, or the returning Ready Player One. While the movie distributed by Byron Allen’s Entertainment Studios relates an important chapter in a great family saga, it lacks the scale and depth (and marketing campaign) required to make a dent in today’s marketplace. At 100 minutes, filmgoers may feel that it plays more like
See full article at Deadline »

BAMcinématek to honour Sam Shepard by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-09-14 17:11:47

BAMcinématek pays screen tribute to Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright - True West: Sam Shepard on Film Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Sam Shepard, who died on July 27, 2017 at the age of 73, will be honored by BAMcinématek in New York with True West: Sam Shepard on Film.

Wim Wenders' Don’t Come Knocking and Paris, Texas (BAFTA Best Adapted Screenplay nomination for Shepard); Philip Kaufman's The Right Stuff (Best Actor in a Supporting Role Oscar nomination for Shepard's portrayal of Chuck Yeager); Graeme Clifford's Frances; Daniel Petrie's Resurrection; Terrence Malick's Days Of Heaven; Michelangelo Antonioni's Zabriskie Point, co-written by Shepard; Robert Altman's adaptation of Fool For Love; Robert Frank's Me And My Brother (text by Shepard, poems by Allen Ginsberg and Peter Orlovsky); Shirley Clarke's video of Shepard's Tongues performed by Joseph Chaikin, and Far North, directed by Sam Shepard will be screened.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

The Law and Jake Wade

Many of MGM’s productions were scraping bottom in 1958, yet the studio found one more acceptable western vehicle for their last big star still on contract. Only-slightly corrupt marshal Robert Taylor edges toward a showdown with the thoroughly corrupt Richard Widmark in an economy item given impressive locations and the sound direction of John Sturges.

The Law and Jake Wade

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1958 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 86 min. / Street Date September 12, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Robert Taylor, Richard Widmark, Patricia Owens, Robert Middleton, Henry Silva, DeForest Kelley, Henry Silva, Burt Douglas, Eddie Firestone.

Cinematography: Robert Surtees

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Written by William Bowers from a novel by Marvin H. Albert

Produced by William B. Hawks

Directed by John Sturges

As the 1950s wore down, MGM was finding it more difficult to properly use its last remaining big-ticket stars on the steady payroll, Cyd Charisse and Robert Taylor. Cyd
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Working Title For The Obi-wan Kenobi Movie Hints at Tatooine Setting

The working title for Lucasfilm's upcoming Obi-Wan Kenobi movie has been revealed by Omega Underground to be "Joshua Tree". The other previous working titles for other recent Star Wars productions include "Space Bears" for The Last Jedi and "Red Cup" for Han Solo movie.

Why is the name "Joshua Tree" important to the Star Wars franchise? Because it could be hinting at Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California. This could be one of the possible shooting locations for the film and that location also served as the shooting location for some of the Tatooine scenes that were shot for the original trilogy.

So, obviously, fans are speculating that the upcoming Obi-Wan movie will take place on Tatooine. Personally, I just assumed that's where the film would take place anyway! I figured that we might see the story of how Obi-Wan got there and that we would see Obi-Wan's first
See full article at GeekTyrant »

Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Sam Shepard

Chicago – He was a true renaissance man, but his unassuming persona would conceal that lofty designation. Sam Shepard was a playwright, actor, author, screenwriter and director of countless important stage and screen works. Shepard died on July 27th, 2017, of complications due to Lou Gehrig’s Disease (Als). He was 73.

Sam Shepard, American Storyteller

Photo credit: File Photo

He was born Samuel Shepard Rogers III in Fort Sheridan, Illinois, and graduated high school in California. After a brief stint in college, he started his career in a traveling theater repertory company. After landing in New York City, he dropped the Rogers from his name and began to work Off Broadway. He won six Obie Awards for his stage writing, and began his screen career by penning “Me and My Brother” (1968) and “Zabriskie Point” (1970). His had a love connection with rocker Patti Smith, which led to the collaborative play “Cowboy Mouth” (1971). He
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Playwright, actor Sam Shepard dies aged 73

Playwright, actor Sam Shepard dies aged 73
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and actor who suffered from Als died at his home.

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright and Oscar-nominated actor Sam Shepard has died from Als. He was 73.

Shepard died on July 27 at his home in Kentucky surrounded by family. “The family requests privacy at this difficult time,” Chris Boneau, the spokesman for the family, said.

Shephard won the Pulitzer Prize in 1979 for his play Buried Child and received a best supporting actor Oscar nomination for his role as Chuck Yeager in The Right Stuff.

His final on-screen appearance came in 2015 on the Netflix drama Bloodline. As an actor his screen credits include Days Of Heaven, Resurrection, Frances, Country, Fool For Love, Crimes Of The Heart, Baby Boom, Steel Magnolias, Bright Angel, Defenseless, Hamlet, The Notebook, Black Hawk Down, The Assassination Of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford, Brothers, Mud, August: Osage County, Cold in July, Midnight Special, In Dubious Battle, and You Were
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Playwright and 'Notebook' Actor, Dead at 73

Sam Shepard, Pulitzer Prize-Winning Playwright and 'Notebook' Actor, Dead at 73
Accomplished playwright and actor Sam Shepard has died, Et can confirm. He was 73 years old.

Shepard died at his home in Kentucky on July 27 of complications from Als, and was surrounded by his family at the time of his death, Chris Boneau, spokesman for the family, said on Monday. Shepard is survived by his children -- Jesse, Hannah and Walker Shepard -- and his sisters, Sandy and Roxanne Rogers.

Funeral arrangements remain private, and plans for a public memorial have not yet been determined.

Pics: Stars We've Lost In Recent Years

"The family requests privacy at this difficult time," Boneau said in a statement.

Shepard found incredible success as both a playwright and as an actor. He won a Pulitzer Prize for drama for his 1979 play, Buried Child, and wrote 40 plays over the course of his career. He also wrote the screenplays for Zabriskie Point; Wim Wenders' Paris, Texas; and Robert Altman's Fool for Love, a film
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Sam Shepard, Lauded Director, Playwright, and Actor, Dies at 73

Sam Shepard, Lauded Director, Playwright, and Actor, Dies at 73
Director, playwright, and actor Sam Shepard has passed away at the age of 73. BroadwayWorld first reported the news this morning.

He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in “The Right Stuff.” He was also the author of forty-four plays, as well as several books, including short stories, essays, and memoirs. He received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for his play “Buried Child.”

As BroadwayWorld notes, “Shepard’s plays are chiefly known for their bleak, poetic, often surrealist elements, black humor and rootless characters living on the outskirts of American society.”

In 2009, he received the Pen/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award as a master American dramatist. Shepard was elected to The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1986. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1986. Shepard was also a dedicated teacher of the arts,
See full article at Indiewire »

Newswire: R.I.P. Sam Shepard, award-winning actor and playwright

Sam Shepard, the award-winning and prolific actor and playwright who was nominated for an Academy Award for his role in The Right Stuff (1983) and won a Pulitzer Prize for his play Buried Child in 1979, has died. The news was broken by Broadway World, and a representative of Shepard’s family tells The New York Times that Shepard died from complications of Lou Gehrig’s disease. He was 73.

Born in 1943 under the name Samuel Shepard Rogers III, Shepard adopted his stage name shortly after moving to New York in the early 1960s, where he first gained renown on the Off-Off-Broadway theater scene. He wrote his first screenplay, Me And My Brother, in 1968, followed by the screenplay for Antonioni’s Zabriskie Point in 1970. His film career began in earnest in the late ‘70s, when he took on the lead role in Terrence Malick’s Days Of ...
See full article at The AV Club »

How Michelangelo Antonioni Mastered the Art of Visual Geometry — Watch

How Michelangelo Antonioni Mastered the Art of Visual Geometry — Watch
“Visual geometry” might not be the first phrase that comes to mind when thinking of Michelangelo Antonioni, but a new video essay published by Fandor makes a strong argument for it being among the Italian master’s essential tools. (Well, that and Monica Vitti, of course.)

Read More: Why ‘Mulholland Drive’ Is the Most Essential Film David Lynch Will Ever Make — Watch

The minute-long video offers a brief rundown of Antonioni’s recurring visual motifs, from showing characters looking through windows (“L’Avventura,” “The Passenger”) and walking through doorways (“The Mystery of Oberwald,” “Identification of a Woman”) to being shown through fences (“Red Desert,” “Zabriskie Point”) and traversing vast landscapes (“La Notte,” “Blowup”). It also takes note of his geometric compositions, namely his frequent use of straight, vertical and converging lines.

Read More: ‘American Gods’ Review: Bryan Fuller Paints a Beautiful, Bloody, and Unblinking Portrait of American Duality

“Creating depth,
See full article at Indiewire »

Gas-s-s-s

Gas-s-s-s – Or – It Became Necessary to Destroy the World in Order to Save It.

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1970 / Color / 1:85 widescreen/ 79 min. / Street Date October 18, 2016 / Gas-s-s-s / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Elaine Giftos, Robert Corff, Cindy Williams, Bud Cort, Ben Vereen, Tally Coppola, Lou Procopio.

Cinematography: Ron Dexter

Film Editor: George Van Noy

Original Music: Country Joe and the Fish

Written and Produced by George Armitage

Directed by Roger Corman

Roger Corman finally accepted himself as an iconic filmmaker for this, his final show for A.I.P.. Barely released and long considered a failure, Gas-s-s-s – Or – It Became Necessary to Destroy the World in Order to Save It sees Corman and his writer associate George Armitage attempting a Mad magazine- like amalgam of all the counterculture trends of the late 1960s. That tactical mistake becomes eighty minutes of unfocused and unfunny satire. Armitage’s script and dialogue might occasionally hit some serendipitous notes,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Discover Two Underseen Michelangelo Antonioni Classics in New Video Essay

A recent video essay on the collaborations of Michelangelo Antonioni and Monica Vitti failed to mention their final film — a rather embarrassing error that, I admit, can make some sense when the work in question has failed to pierce the canon in virtually any way. But what if that’s still not half enough? What if it’s a major step forward in cinematographic expression and one of the most visually pleasurable films ever made?

I could, but, thankfully, Scout Tafoya has updated his series, “The Unloved,” with a video essay on that 1980 picture and Zabriskie Point, another underappreciated Antonioni effort that’s probably just some little nudge away from becoming a favorite of many cineastes. More than a worthwhile bit of critical discourse, this piece benefits from its moving images. The allure of Antonioni’s cinema can be difficult to summarize in just about any form when their mood
See full article at The Film Stage »

Locarno Blog. "The Party"

  • MUBI
The Notebook is the North American home for Locarno Film Festival Artistic Director Carlo Chatrian's blog. Chatrian has been writing thoughtful blog entries in Italian on Locarno's website since he took over as Director in late 2012, and now you can find the English translations here on the Notebook as they're published. The Locarno Film Festival will be taking place August 2 - 12.If I think back to my earliest memories of the cinema, one fact—along with the names of certain films—leaps to mind. Or rather, not a fact, but a sensation. A sensation that fades into a hazy memory. At the movies I laughed at the twists and turns of bodies that could transpose acrobatic moves into everyday life, and at other bodies, too, ones that really were made of rubber, or seemed to be. Bodies that could be bent out of shape and absorb incredible falls, shocks and
See full article at MUBI »

Sundance 2017 Announces New Frontier Lineup, Including 22 Vr Experiences and 11 New Installations

Sundance 2017 Announces New Frontier Lineup, Including 22 Vr Experiences and 11 New Installations
As the Sundance Film Festival’s groundbreaking and technology-facing New Frontier section kicks off its second decade in existence, the 2017 edition of the section boasts its most stacked and varied programing picks yet. The full slate includes “story worlds” in Augmented Reality headsets, projection-mapped acrobatics, a Vr beauty salon producing neuroscience data via the internet of things and a host of socialized, interactive and immersively haptic Vr story experiences.

The rest of the lineup includes live performances, a feature film and augmented reality experiences built to complement 22 Vr experiences and 11 installations, showcased between three venues in Park City. The Claim Jumper will host 10 immersive installations focused on cross-disciplinary story construction, while the Vr Palace will feature 17 Vr experiences alongside an additional installation and the Vr Bar will offer a lineup of mobile Vr. Two New Frontier projects are part of the Festival’s New Climate program, which highlights the environment and climate change.
See full article at Indiewire »

Sundance 2017 announces New Frontier lineup

  • ScreenDaily
Sundance 2017 announces New Frontier lineup
Top brass at the Park City jamboree announced on Thursday 20 virtual and augmented reality presentations and 11 installations.

The eleventh New Frontier programme includes storyworlds in Augmented Reality headsets, and a Vr beauty salon producing neuroscience data.

Established Vr artist Chris Milk and Aaron Kobli are behind Life Of Us, while immersive journalist Nonny de la Peña will premiere Out Of Exile: Daniel’s Story.

New Frontier will be staged at three Park City venues: Claim Jumper will host ten immersive installations; the Vr Palace will feature 17 Vr experiences alongside an additional installation; and the Vr Bar will offer a line-up of mobile Vr.

Three projects are part of the festival’s New Climate programme highlighting the environment and climate change.

Shari Frilot, Sundance Film Festival senior programmer and chief curator, New Frontier, said: “In an era that has recalibrated economies, redefined social realms and rewired the connection between the individual and the world, we must also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Chris Milk, Nonny de la Peña in Sundance New Frontier

  • ScreenDaily
Chris Milk, Nonny de la Peña in Sundance New Frontier
Top brass at the Park City jamboree announced on Thursday 20 virtual and augmented reality presentations and 11 installations.

The eleventh New Frontier programme includes storyworlds in Augmented Reality headsets, and a Vr beauty salon producing neuroscience data.

Established Vr artist Chris Milk and Aaron Kobli are behind Life Of Us, while immersive journalist Nonny de la Peña will premiere Out Of Exile: Daniel’s Story.

New Frontier will be staged at three Park City venues: Claim Jumper will host ten immersive installations; the Vr Palace will feature 17 Vr experiences alongside an additional installation; and the Vr Bar will offer a line-up of mobile Vr.

Three projects are part of the festival’s New Climate programme highlighting the environment and climate change.

Shari Frilot, Sundance Film Festival senior programmer and chief curator, New Frontier, said: “In an era that has recalibrated economies, redefined social realms and rewired the connection between the individual and the world, we must also
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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