6.7/10
3,341
46 user 21 critic

Too Late the Hero (1970)

PG | | Action, Drama, War | 26 June 1970 (Canada)
A reluctant hero, American Lieutenant Sam Lawson, is secunded to a motley British unit tasked with destroying a Japanese radio on a Philippine island.

Director:

Robert Aldrich

Writers:

Robert Aldrich (story), Robert Sherman (story) | 2 more credits »
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Caine ... Pvt. Tosh Hearne
Cliff Robertson ... Lt. Sam Lawson
Ian Bannen ... Pvt. Jock Thornton
Harry Andrews ... Col. Thompson
Ronald Fraser ... Pvt. Campbell
Denholm Elliott ... Capt. Hornsby
Lance Percival Lance Percival ... Cpl. McLean
Percy Herbert ... Sgt. Johnstone
Patrick Jordan ... Sergeant Major
Sam Kydd ... Colour-Sergeant
William Beckley ... Pvt. Currie
Martin Horsey Martin Horsey ... Pvt. Griffiths
Harvey Jason ... Signalman Scott
Don Knight ... Pvt. Connolly
Roger Newman Roger Newman ... Pvt. Riddle
Edit

Storyline

A World War II movie set on a Pacific island. Japanese and Allied forces occupy different parts of the island. When a group of British soldiers are sent on a mission behind enemy lines, things don't go exactly to plan. This movie differs in that some of the "heros" are very reluctant, but they come good when they are pursued by the Japanese, who are determined to prevent them returning to base. Written by Rob Hartill

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

War. It's A Dying Business.

Genres:

Action | Drama | War

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

A sign in the head nurse's office reads "Sister George". This is an allusion to one of Robert Aldrich's previous movies, and one of his personal favorites, The Killing of Sister George (1968). See more »

Goofs

When the patrol ambushes the first Japanese patrol, there are five Japanese in this patrol. Hornsby shoots one in the back, causing him to fall to the ground. The rest of the British troops then fire at the remaining Japanese, of which there are still five standing. See more »

Quotes

Capt. John G. Nolan: [Sarcastically referring to Lawson whom he secunded to the British] They're gonna love him!
See more »

Alternate Versions

When originally released the US and UK versions each had a different survivor at the end of the film. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Postgraduate Course in Sexual Love (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Teddy Bear's Picnic
Written by John W. Bratton
Lyrics by Jimmy Kennedy
Sung by the patrol as it leaves the base
See more »

User Reviews

 
A commando in Pacific Ocean is sent beyond enemy lines for a suicidal mission against Japanese
18 February 2009 | by ma-cortesSee all my reviews

This taut war film is set during spring 1942 WWII, a superior officer(Henry Fonda) assigns a reluctant American lieutenant (Clift Robertson) a dangerous mission in island of New Hebridas . At the island of Pacific , British military rule over the South region, while Japanese govern the North part . The goal of US Navy turns out to be the occupying the Japanese zone . For getting the objective is necessary destroying a radio station from Japanese . The lieutenant goes to the regiment commanded by a colonel (Harry Andrews) joining forces for participate the suicidal mission . It's formed a commando under orders a captain (Denholm Elliott) and a motley gang of soldiers released after fall of Singapur , as a tough sergeant (Percy Herbert who was actually a prisoner of the Japanese Army in The Second World War) , a mad soldier (Ian Bannen), a despicable private (Ronald Frazer) , among them.

This exciting war movie contains thrills , noisy action , rousing adventure , tension , lots of violence and twists and turns . Well made plot is based on a story by Robert Sherman and the same director Robert Aldrich . The powerful Aldrich camera crams in as much shock impact as possible . The picture kept afloat by the skills of their all-star cast formed by largely British actors . Michael Caine as a cynical soldier sustains and compels interest by careful concentration on his acting with cockney accent . Clift Robertson as lieutenant avoiding patriotism , gives a good performance , as always . There're strong portrayals by Ronald Fraser as a rogue private and Ken Takakura as Japanese officer . Thrilling and suspenseful musical score by musician Gerard Fried, Stanley Kubrik's usual . Nice cinematography by Joseph Biroc reflecting appropriately the lush jungle . Tense and brilliant direction by Robert Aldrich , a warlike (Dirty Dozen,Attack) and Western (Ulzana's raid , Apache , Veracruz) expert . It's a must see and a standout in its genre .


11 of 14 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 46 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

26 June 1970 (Canada) See more »

Also Known As:

Suicide Run See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$6,250,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(video compilation) | (TCM Print) | (DVD)

Sound Mix:

70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System) (70 mm prints)| Mono (Westrex Recording System) (35 mm prints)

Color:

Color (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed