Ryan's Daughter (1970) - News Poster

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Blake Lively Gives Birth - Report

Actress Blake Lively has reportedly given birth to her second child with husband Ryan Reynolds.

The Savages beauty welcomed the tot at a hospital in Manhattan, New York, a source tells the New York Post's Page Six gossip column.

No further details about the child's birth were available as of yet, and a representative for the new parents has yet to comment on the news.

The newborn is a sibling for Blake and Ryan's daughter James, who will turn two in December.

Meanwhile, the family's new arrival already has friends in high places - the insider reveals Taylor Swift was en route to visit mother and baby on Friday morning (September 30).

The pop superstar was among the guests at Blake's baby shower, which doubled as her 29th birthday bash, in the Big Apple in late August, when the actress gathered friends and family at the Campagna restaurant at the Bedford Post Inn,
See full article at GossipCenter »

Wild in the Streets

Shelley Winters, Christopher Jones and Diane Varsi star in American-International's most successful 'youth rebellion' epic -- a political sci-fi satire about a rock star whose opportunistic political movement overthrows the government and puts everyone over 35 into concentration camps... to be force-fed LSD. Wild in the Streets Blu-ray Olive Films 1968 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 97 min. / Street Date August 16, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98 Starring Shelley Winters, Christopher Jones, Diane Varsi, Hal Holbrook, Millie Perkins, Richard Pryor, Bert Freed, Kevin Coughlin, Larry Bishop, Michael Margotta, Ed Begley, May Ishihara. Cinematography Richard Moore Film Editor Fred Feitshans Jr., Eve Newman Original Music Les Baxter Written by Robert Thom from his short story "The Day it All Happened, Baby" Produced by Burt Topper Directed by Barry Shear

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Back around 1965 - 1966 we endured this stupid buzzword concept called The Generation Gap, a notion that there was a natural divide between old people and their kids.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Angry Hills

Robert Mitchum all but snoozes through this promising war-espionage thriller that pits lazy Gestapo agents against clueless partisans in occupied Greece. It's got great locations and a good cast, but director Robert Aldrich seems off his feed -- there's not a lot of excitement to be had. The Angry Hills DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1959 / B&W / 2:35 enhanced widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date February 16, 2016 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Robert Mitchum, Stanley Baker, Elisabeth Mueller, Gia Scala, Theodore Bikel, Sebastian Cabot, Donald Wolfit, Marius Goring, Jocelyn Lane, Kieron Moore, George Pastell, Marita Constantinou, Alec Mango. Cinematography Stephen Dade Film Editor Peter Tanner Production Design Ken Adam Original Music Richard Rodney Bennett Written by A.I. Bezzerides from the novel by Leon Uris Produced by Raymond Stross Directed by Robert Aldrich

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Director Robert Aldrich had come through with successes for Burt Lancaster's production company (Apache, Vera Cruz
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hawaii

Julie Andrews, Max von Sydow and Richard Harris bring James Michener's true saga to life -- but it's the story of the destruction of paradise. A huge success just the same, producer Walter Mirisch's film testifies to the skill with which he brought together big talent for a show that doesn't compromise with a happy-happy historical revision. Hawaii Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1966 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 161 min. / Ship Date January 19, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Julie Andrews, Max von Sydow, Richard Harris, Gene Hackman, Carroll O'Connor, Jocelyne Lagarde, Manu Tupou, Ted Nobriga, Elizabeth Logue. Cinematography Russell Harlan Production Designer Cary Odell Art Direction James W. Sullivan Film Editor Stuart Gilmore Original Music Elmer Bernstein Written by Dalton Trumbo, Daniel Taradash from the novel by James Michener Produced by Walter Mirisch Directed by George Roy Hill

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Well, fans of James Michener that missed the
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Washington Man Accused of Killing His Ex-Girlfriend's Mother and Her Dog After He Was Dumped: Police

  • PEOPLE.com
Washington Man Accused of Killing His Ex-Girlfriend's Mother and Her Dog After He Was Dumped: Police
A 19-year-old man has been detained in Washington's Pierce County, where police allege he murdered his ex-girlfriend's mother before killing her dog. In a statement obtained by People, Pierce County's prosecutor, Mark Lindquist, says his office has filed murder, burglary and animal cruelty charges against Austin Richard Moores Nelson. Nelson has pleaded not guilty to the charges, and denies any involvement in Teresa Ryan's shooting death, the statement says. He is being held on $2 million bail. According to Lindquist's statement, Nelson began dating Ryan's teenage daughter four months ago. Authorities say the mother allegedly told Nelson to stay away from the 15-year-old girl,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Washington Man Accused of Killing His Ex-Girlfriend's Mother and Her Dog After He Was Dumped: Police

  • PEOPLE.com
Washington Man Accused of Killing His Ex-Girlfriend's Mother and Her Dog After He Was Dumped: Police
A 19-year-old man has been detained in Washington's Pierce County, where police allege he murdered his ex-girlfriend's mother before killing her dog. In a statement obtained by People, Pierce County's prosecutor, Mark Lindquist, says his office has filed murder, burglary and animal cruelty charges against Austin Richard Moores Nelson. Nelson has pleaded not guilty to the charges, and denies any involvement in Teresa Ryan's shooting death, the statement says. He is being held on $2 million bail. According to Lindquist's statement, Nelson began dating Ryan's teenage daughter four months ago. Authorities say the mother allegedly told Nelson to stay away from the 15-year-old girl,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension review

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Meet the Paranormal Activity film that promises to wrap the series up! Here's our review of The Ghost Dimension...

This is a spoiler-free review, which includes plot details from the previous five instalments in the Paranormal Activity series.

Back in 2009, Paramount masterminded a revolutionary marketing campaign for Oren Peli's micro-budget found footage horror movie Paranormal Activity. With endorsements from the likes of Steven Spielberg, it was arguably the most hyped film of its year and certainly the most profitable, returning $193m on a $15,000 budget.

Sequels abounded and the films comfortably usurped the annual Halloween slot occupied by the Saw franchise over the course of the following three sequels. 2013 was supposed to see two Paranormal Activity movies - a “Latin-American oriented” spin-off at the beginning of the year and then a fifth instalment at Halloween as usual, but the cool reception to Paranormal Activity 4 apparently led
See full article at Den of Geek »

Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Song Of The Sea: how an animated treat was made

We look at how director Tomm Moore created the Oscar-nominated animation Song Of The Sea, and how the Irish landscape inspired it...

Walking along Ventry beach in south west island, it's easy to see how a filmmaker might be inspired by the spectacular landscape: the rolling hills and craggy rocks, the overwhelming air of tranquillity. But the inspiration for animator Tomm Moore's new film, the Oscar-nominated Song Of The Sea, was inspired by a less than tranquil experience.

About a decade ago, Moore was staying on holiday in the nearby town of Dingle, and visited Ventry beach with his 10-year-old son. To their horror, they found the beach littered with the bodies of dead grey seals. Reports at the time suggested that local fishermen, who blamed the seals for dwindling fish stocks, were responsible for the cull.

"I was talking to a local lady, and we were disturbed by
See full article at Den of Geek »

'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win

  • Hitfix
'Birdman' cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki joins exclusive club with Oscar win
By winning the Best Cinematography Oscar for a second year in a row, "Birdman" director of photography Emmanuel Lubezki has joined a truly elite club whose ranks haven't been breached in nearly two decades. Only four other cinematographers have won the prize in two consecutive years. The last time it happened was in 1994 and 1995, when John Toll won for Edward Zwick's "Legends of the Fall" and Mel Gibson's "Braveheart" respectively. Before that you have to go all the way back to the late '40s, when Winton Hoch won in 1948 (Victor Fleming's "Joan of Arc" with Ingrid Bergman) and 1949 (John Ford's western "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"). Both victories came in the color category, as the Academy awarded prizes separately for black-and-white and color photography from 1939 to 1956. Leon Shamroy also won back-to-back color cinematography Oscars, for Henry King's 1944 Woodrow Wilson biopic "Wilson" and John M. Stahl
See full article at Hitfix »

Their type? The writers who fell for film stars

From Siegfried Sassoon and Ivor Novello to Gore Vidal and Fred Astaire, a surprisingly large number of writers have paired off with film stars

On Monday, a raunchy letter from Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich – a surreal fantasy about her, reflecting what he called an "unsynchronised passion" that endured for more than 25 years – is part of an online auction of Dietrich's possessions. Although their relationship remained platonic, many other authors did have movie-star lovers …

F Scott FitzgeraldLois Moran

Fitzgerald's affair in the 1920s with this Zelda lookalike, a silent screen actor who was 17 when he first met her, infuriated his wife – she once threw a jewellery gift from him out of a train window while raging about Moran – but inspired Dick Diver's romance with the actor Rosemary Hoyt in Tender Is the Night.

Siegfried SassoonIvor Novello

The war poet's relationship with Novello – now remembered mostly as a songwriter,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actor Christopher Jones Dead At 72; Starred In "Wild In The Streets" And "Ryan's Daughter"

  • CinemaRetro
Actor Christopher Jones has died at age 72. Once touted as the heir to James Dean, Jones boasted a handsome face and the same type of brooding intensity that had made legends of Dean and Brando. Jones got his first big break in the 1960s Western TV series The Legend of Jesse James but the show lasted only one season. After appearances on The Man From U.N.C.L.E. and Judd for the Defense, Jones graduated to feature films. He starred in the little-seen 1967 drama Chubasco (click here for review), the hit 1968 Roger Corman production of Wild in the Streets (in which he played a rock star who becomes President of the United States), Three in the Attic and the spy thriller The Looking Glass War. His most high profile role was as a British army officer who falls in a forbidden love affair with an Irish girl in David Lean's 1970 film Ryan's Daughter.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Barry Jackson obituary

Actor best known for playing the pathologist George Bullard in Midsomer Murders

The actor Barry Jackson, who has died aged 75, was a staple of British television for more than 50 years but it was not until he was in his 60s that he earned a degree of stardom, thanks to his portrayal of the pathologist Dr George Bullard in 76 episodes (1997-2011) of the popular mystery series Midsomer Murders.

Bullard, the friend of local inspector Tom Barnaby (John Nettles), is called in whenever a murder victim is found, which happens in each feature-length episode. "It's always good when I get more to say than 'He died at 11pm'," Jackson remarked. "I try to be as real as possible, though I call the show pantomime crime, not true crime. That's its appeal – everyone gets bludgeoned to death but there's something quite old-fashioned and harmless about it."

From the plots of Midsomer Murders, you
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Maggie Pulls a Gun on 'The Walking Dead'

Maggie Pulls a Gun on 'The Walking Dead'
What's causing Maggie (Lauren Cohan) to pull a piece on The Walking Dead? We won't know until Sunday, but these three photographs – all exclusive to Rolling Stone – give us plenty to consider. In "Isolation," Season Four's third episode, it was Maggie's job to keep everyone safe when the brigade left for the veterinary hospital. Could it be Glenn's flu that's keeping his lady on edge? It's good that Cohan, 31, is no stranger to stress, having witnessed the not-at-all-amicable dismissal of The Walking Dead's first showrunner, Frank Darabont. "It was a tumultuous time,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

'Next Friday' Coming Out On Blu-ray DVD In Sept.

I always wonder how studios decide what to release on blu-ray DVD since there are so many great and classic films that have yet to be released in the format, that could definitely benefit from the greatly enhanced and sharpened sound and image. I mean, films such as David Lean's Ryan's Daughter, George Stevens' Giant, John Frankenheimer's Ww II actioner The Train, or even Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust. Instead we get Next Friday. Now don't get me wrong. It's no classic, but I think it's a serviceable sequel to the eternally popular 1995 Friday comedy film. It's got some laughs in it and it's nowhere as bad as 2002's Friday After Next.. But it wouldn't be exactly on my top...
See full article at ShadowAndAct »

Best Movie Ever?: "Paper Moon"

This feels like a selfish addition to the "Best Movie Ever?" cannon since I'm personally obsessed with Paper Moon, but guess what? I'm right to include it. And you're wrong not to watch Paper Moon every year, particularly this one thanks to its 40th anniversary. Repent and get going.

You're also wrong not to spend more time thinking about whether Paper Moon or What's Up, Doc? is Peter Bogdanovich's best movie (because we all understand that The Last Picture Show draaaaags, right?) And you're especially wrong if you think The Sting, another old-timey blockbuster about suave wheeler-dealers released in 1973, deserved Best Picture over Paper Moon. The Sting is a boring carousel of well-costumed movie stars. Paper Moon has a soul. And tomboy flair. And it wasn't even nominated.

Paper Moon manages to be both quaint and gritty, and that's all in the casting: Moses Pray (Ryan O'Neal, a fair
See full article at The Backlot »

One fan's mission to Lars

His dream was to meet Metallica's drummer, Lars Ulrich. But Tom Spicer has a rare form of autism and lives in a care home. So in 2009, his brother and sister packed his bags and set out with him on a road trip across America, capturing the journey in a remarkable, moving and funny film

This is a story that almost didn't happen. And I am on a train to Devon to meet the people who were determined to see that it did. The saying "Be careful what you wish for", in the case of the Spicer family, needs adjusting to "Be careful what your brother wishes for". It is the story of three siblings: Kate, a 42-year-old London-based journalist, her youngest brother, Will, a 36-year-old film-maker, and their middle brother, 40-year-old Tom, born with fragile X syndrome, the commonest cause of inherited learning disability, affecting about one in 4,000 men
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Update On Cinerama Widescreen Weekend Festival, Bradford England April 27-30

  • CinemaRetro
Thomas Hauerslev, who runs the fantastic retro movie web site In70mm.com, provides this full schedule for this year's Widescreen Weekend festival in Bradford, England. (Thomas also does yeoman work as one of the programmers for the festival.) The theme of this year's program is the celebration of the 60th anniversary of Cinerama. It will be a treasure trove of films rarely seen in their original format, ranging from three-panel Cinerama to Super Panavision 70 prints. Titles include the rarely-seen Russian Adventure, How the West Was Won, Ryan's Daughter, This is Cinerama, Cinerama Adventure, Around the World in 80 Days and The Wonderful World of the Brothers Grimm, shown for the first time in 40 years in three panel Cinerama (co-sponsored by Cinema Retro). The festival draws classic film historians from around the world, this year including Kevin Brownlow and Sir Christopher Frayling. Cinerama historians Dave Strohmaier ad Randy Gitsch will
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Rewind TV: Birdsong; We'll Take Manhattan; Call the Midwife; The Real Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines; Jonathan Meades on France – review

The trenches became golden, David Bailey was the father of youth culture, and the East End of the 50s lacked life. It was a good week for revisionism…

Birdsong (BBC1) | iPlayer

We'll Take Manhattan (BBC4) | iPlayer

Call the Midwife (BBC1) | iPlayer

The Real Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines (BBC2) | iPlayer

Jonathan Meades on France (BBC4) | iPlayer

Where would we be without widescreen television? More to the point, where would Eddie Redmayne's mouth be? Presumably jutting out either side of the box. For surely it's only thanks to the miracle of horizontal image compression that all of the actor's lilo-sandwich kisser can be contained in a close-up.

And it came in for forensically close attention in the first part of Birdsong, the two-part adaptation of Sebastian Faulks's novel. Not since David Lean's epic heyday has a camera focused so indulgently on a man's face, when Peter O'Toole
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards: Odd Men Out Bob Fosse, Woody Allen, Ingmar Bergman

Martin Balsam, Albert Finney in Murder on the Orient Express, directed by DGA (but not Oscar) nominee Sidney Lumet DGA Awards vs. Academy Awards 1960s: Odd Men Out Jules Dassin, Federico Fellini, Arthur Penn 1970 DGA David Lean, Ryan's Daughter Bob Rafelson, Five Easy Pieces AMPAS Federico Fellini, Satyricon Ken Russell, Women in Love DGA/AMPAS Franklin J. Schaffner, Patton Robert Altman, Mash Arthur Hiller, Love Story   1971 DGA Robert Mulligan, Summer of '42 AMPAS Norman Jewison, Fiddler on the Roof DGA/AMPAS William Friedkin, The French Connection Peter Bogdanovich, The Last Picture Show Stanley Kubrick, A Clockwork Orange John Schlesinger, Sunday Bloody Sunday   1972 DGA George Roy Hill, Slaughterhouse-Five Martin Ritt, Sounder AMPAS Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Sleuth Jan Troell, The Emigrants DGA/AMPAS Bob Fosse, Cabaret John Boorman, Deliverance Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather   1973 DGA Sidney Lumet, Serpico AMPAS Ingmar Bergman, Cries and Whispers DGA/AMPAS George Roy Hill, The Sting Bernardo Bertolucci,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »
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