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The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970) Poster

Trivia

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With a two hundred sixty-page script and a budget of ten million dollars, this was set to be a two hour and forty-five-minute Road Show movie with an intermission for comfort. It was to be the "Big One" for Billy Wilder. The shooting schedule ran for six months and resulted in a rough-cut that came in at three hours and twenty minutes. The movie was originally structured as a series of very specifically structured linked episodes, each with a particular title and theme. The opening sequence was to feature Watson's grandson in London claiming his inherited dispatch box from Cox & Company, and there was also a flashback to Holmes' Oxford days to explain his distrust of women. All were shot, but deleted from the final print. So what happened? Well, it appears that United Artists suffered several major movie flops in 1969 that pretty much scuppered the road show format for Wilder's massive project. Studio execs ordered the movie to be cut to fill a regular theatrical running time, whittling it down to a two hour and five-minute version. The episodic format made the pruning process relatively simple, so cut were the opening sequence, the Oxford flashback and two full episodes titled "The Dreadful Business of the Naked Honeymooners" at fifteen minutes, and "The Curious Case of the Upside Down Room" at thirty minutes. We can only hope that the full footage can one day be restored, although a full print is not currently thought to exist.
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Originally, the scenes featuring the Loch Ness Monster were intended to be filmed in the actual Loch. A life-size prop was built which had several Nessie-like humps used to disguise flotation devices. The humps were removed, however, at Billy Wilder's request. Unfortunately, during a test run in Loch Ness, the Monster-prop sank and was never recovered. A second prop, a miniature with just the head and neck, was built, but was only filmed inside a studio tank. Geneviève Page said of this in the biography "Nobody's Perfect: Billy Wilder" by Charlotte Chandler): "When we lost our Loch Ness monster, he (Wilder) wasn't too concerned, even though he was also the producer. He was more concerned about how the man who made it felt when all his work sank to the bottom of the Loch Ness. He went over and comforted him." The original monster prop was located on the bottom of Loch Ness in April 2016 during a survey of the loch by an underwater robot.
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By the time of filming, Sir Christopher Lee had become famous as Count Dracula. When he and Billy Wilder walked on the shores of Loch Ness at dusk, with bats circling overhead, Wilder said to him, "You must feel quite at home here."
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Writer and Director Billy Wilder said of this movie in the book "Conversations with Wilder" by Cameron Crowe, "when I came back (from Paris), it was an absolute disaster, the way it was cut. The whole prologue was cut, a half-sequence was cut. I had tears in my eyes as I looked at the thing. It was the most elegant picture I've ever shot."
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Sir Christopher Lee comes the role of Mycroft with considerable experience in the Sherlock Holmes universe. He previously played Sherlock Holmes and Sir Henry Baskerville. It's been said that Lee is the only, or at least one of few actors, to portray on-screen both Mycroft Holmes and Sherlock Holmes.
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Originally, Peter O'Toole was going to play Sherlock Holmes with Peter Sellers playing Dr. Watson, but Billy Wilder decided to go with lesser known actors instead of stars.
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According to Billy Wilder, since because of schedule conflicts, he couldn't supervise the bowdlerization of the picture demanded by the Studios, he entrusted the task to Editor Ernest Walter. Nevertheless, Wilder supposedly strongly disliked the cuts made by Walter, and couldn't re-edit the movie because all of the deleted scenes were lost or thrown away. Some of those scenes are available today, but never with both the audio and the video intact.
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At the request of Writer and Director Billy Wilder, Composer Miklós Rózsa adapted music from his own 1956 Violin Concerto as the basis for the film score, supplementing this with further original music.
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Stills and soundtrack show John Williams in a substantial role as a bank official and George Benson as Inspector Lestrade. All of their scenes were ultimately cut.
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Sir Christopher Lee replaced George Sanders on short notice.
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When Robert Stephens asked Billy Wilder how to play Sherlock Holmes, Wilder replied, "You must play it like Hamlet. And you must not put on one pound of weight. I want you to look like a pencil."
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The subplot in which Sherlock Holmes is approached by a famous ballerina who wishes him to father a child on her is inspired by a real-life incident. George Bernard Shaw was once approached by the notorious dancer Isadora Duncan, who told him that, if they had a child together, it would have "my beauty and your brains"; Shaw rebuffed her quickly, saying, "Ah, yes, dear lady, but what if it has my beauty and your brains instead?" In this movie, Sherlock Holmes uses a rather different method of putting the lady off.
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A rare appearance for Sir Christopher Lee without a hairpiece.
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The New York Times reported on April 13, 2016 in an article by Daniel Victor: "Loch Ness Monster Is Found! (Kind of. Not Really.)". The thirty foot prop of the Loch Ness Monster, which was discovered at the bottom of the famed Loch Ness Scottish lake in April 2016, was found "180 meters down on the bed of the lake in April. It had sunk during production in 1969 and a new Nessie was created for the film."
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One of this movie's main movie posters featured a long text preamble that read: "What you don't know about Sherlock Holmes has made a great motion picture. Everyone knows about the lightning-quick mind, the dazzling wit, the magnifying glass. But what about the little glass vials he so cunningly kept hidden. And what about the security blunder that almost cost the British Empire its navy. And what about the woman who spent the night with him."
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This movie's epic big-scale production design included, according to the Virgin Film Guide, a "massive backlot reproduction of Baker Street".
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Charlton Heston was considered to star as Sherlock Holmes, but Billy Wilder would hear none of it. Heston played Holmes in The Crucifer of Blood (1991), and in the play of the same name.
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The following have commented on the movie's original intended long length and massive editing cut down: Virgin Film Guide: "The film was cut by more than thirty minutes by United Artists"; Leonard Maltin: The movie was "intended as a three and a half hour film"; Allmovie.com: "Heavily re-edited and rearranged both before and after its release"; Halliwells: "What started as four stories is reduced to two"; Empire: "Originally a three-hour epic, this 1970 movie was taken from its creator and mutilated by the wholesale lopping of entire episodes".
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Billy Wilder cast Robert Stephens and Colin Blakely because he did not wish to associate his Holmes and Watson with the characters of well-known Hollywood leading men.
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Playing Sherlock Holmes in this movie, Robert Stephens also played Holmes on stage, in the William Gillette theatre production. His next movie and television gig after this movie was in season one, episode two, "The Missing Witness Sensation" of The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes (1971).
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Around this time, there were also plans to film the Leslie Bricusse musical "Baker Street" which debuted on Broadway in 1965. Fritz Weaver had played Holmes on-stage, and Peter Sallis was his Watson. Christopher Walken played one of the villains. Due to its poor performance on Broadway (it played over three hundred shows, but had been hugely expensive to mount) and the worry that it would cover much of the same ground as the Billy Wilder project, it never materialized.
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Sir Christopher Lee (Mycroft Holmes) portrayed Sherlock Holmes at least three times in filmed productions. Once before this movie, in Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962), and twice afterwards, in Sherlock Holmes and the Leading Lady (1991) and Sherlock Holmes: Incident at Victoria Falls (1992).
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Film critic Leonard Maltin reported that a cut twelve minute sequence, titled "The Dreadful Business of the Naked Honeymooners", was "restored to LaserDisc". This unreleased footage premiered in 1994 for that LaserDisc release.
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The DVD sleeve notes describe this movie as a "satirical homage" to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes.
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Sir Richard Attenborough was considered for the part of Dr. Watson.
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The BBC News, in an article by BBC Scotland Highlands and Islands reporter Steven McKenzie, reported on April 13, 2016 with the headline: "Film's lost Nessie monster prop found in Loch Ness". The article stated a "thirty foot (nine meter) model of the Loch Ness Monster built in 1969 for a Sherlock Holmes movie has been found almost fifty years after it sank in the loch. It has been seen for the first time in images captured by an underwater robot. Loch Ness expert Adrian Shine said the shape, measurements and location pointed to the object being the prop." He continued: "We have found a monster, but not the one many people might have expected. The model was built with a neck and two humps and taken alongside a pier for filming of portions of the film in 1969. The director (Billy Wilder) did not want the humps and asked that they be removed, despite warnings I suspect from the rest of the production that this would affect its buoyancy. And the inevitable happened. The model sank. We can confidently say that this is the model because of where it was found, the shape, there is the neck and no humps, and from the measurements." The piece states that during production the model "sank while being towed behind a boat. Wilder is said to have comforted Veevers (Wally Veevers) after watching his creation disappear beneath the waves. The director, who had also been dogged with problems lighting scenes at Loch Ness, had a new monster made, but just its head and neck, and moved the filming to a large water tank in a film studio."
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This was Billy Wilder's most expensive movie.
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The opening shot of the "Cox & Co." bank, and the opening line, "Somewhere in the vaults of a bank in London, there is a tin dispatch box with my name on it" come from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Problem of Thor Bridge", where the actual line is: "Somewhere in the vaults of the bank of Cox and Co., at Charing Cross, there is a travel-worn and battered tin dispatch-box with my name, John H. Watson, M.D., Late Indian Army, painted upon the lid."
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Sir Christopher Lee (Mycroft Holmes) had previously portrayed Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sir Henry Baskerville in The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959).
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The 1970s had a cycle of Sherlock Holmes satires and comedies. Titles included The Seven-Per-Cent Solution (1976), The Hound of the Baskervilles (1978), The Adventure of Sherlock Holmes' Smarter Brother (1975), and this movie. In the 1980s came Without a Clue (1988).
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Final theatrical movie of Catherine Lacey. The following year, Lacey appeared on The Rivals of Sherlock Holmes (1971) season one, episode nine, "The Woman in the Big Hat".
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Rex Harrison wanted to play Sherlock Holmes, but Writer and Director Billy Wilder turned him down.
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Apparently, Billy Wilder had been a fan of Sherlock Holmes for many years prior to making this movie.
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The name of the underwater submersible was the "H.M.S. Jonah".
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Sir Christopher Lee appeared in at least six Sir Arthur Conan Doyle filmed adaptations or related filmed productions. They are: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1959), Sherlock Holmes and the Deadly Necklace (1962), The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes (1970), Sherlock Holmes and the Leading Lady (1991), Sherlock Holmes: Incident at Victoria Falls (1992), and the "The Leather Funnel" episode of Orson Welles' Great Mysteries (1973).
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The DVD sleeve notes report the following piece of trivia: "This was not the only time Robert Stephens portrayed the world-famous detective. He also portrayed Holmes in the famous William Gillette stage play about the private eye on Broadway."
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One of two theatrical movies based on a story and/or characters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle that were released in 1970. They were The Adventures of Gerard (1970) (based on the "Brigadier Gerard" stories) and this movie (features characters created by).
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Colin Blakely was cast quite late in pre-production, and was hired by Billy Wilder on the strong recommendation of Robert Stephens, a friend and colleague of Blakely's in his work with the National Theatre, and his co-star in the original stage production of "The Royal Hunt Of The Sun" by Peter Shaffer in 1964. In that, Blakely played Pizarro and Stephens played Atahuallpa. Both had been lavishly praised for their performances.
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When first announced in 1964, Louis Jourdan was also lined up to star.
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The original script ran for one hundred sixty-five pages. The final screenplay was two hundred sixty pages.
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Billy Wilder began tinkering with a Holmes project as far back as 1957, when he was in London for Witness for the Prosecution (1957). He negotiated with the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle to mount a Holmes musical on Broadway, starring Rex Harrison. Moss Hart, Alan Jay Lerner, and Frederick Loewe were briefly enlisted as collaborators. Wilder then considered making a movie musical in 1963.
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Sir Laurence Olivier was considered for the part of Mycroft Holmes.
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The name of the clandestine society, as stated on the DVD sleeve notes, was "Her Majesty's Secret Service".
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The old lady in the wheelchair uses a contraption to pull up her birdcage cover that closely resembles a drawbridge. This foreshadows later in the movie when a drawbridge becomes part of the story.
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Harry Kurnitz and John Mortimer were briefly attached to write the script at different points.
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The Espionage Filmography states that this movie "was disastrously mutilated by the studio (United Artists), who cut over one hour of material."
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Some U.S. movie posters declared that the private life of Sherlock Holmes was anything but elementary.
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"The film is divided into two separate, unequal stories" according to the Wikipedia website.
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Robert Stephens had mixed feelings about playing Sherlock Holmes and felt it was quite a strain. Later on, he strongly advised Jeremy Brett to turn down the role when the "Granada" TV series was being planned.
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Robert Stephens came to regret playing Sherlock Holmes and attempted to dissuade Jeremy Brett from accepting the role many years later.
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Billy Wilder performed three duties on this movie. Wilder was the man Producer, a co-Screenwriter, and the Director.
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Cameo 

Miklós Rózsa: Uncredited, this movie's composer as an orchestra conductor of the Swan Lake ballet.
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Frank Thornton: As Porter.
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

In the opening sequence, the music score retrieved from Dr. Watson's dispatch box displays the header "Sherlock Holmes, comp." and the dedication "for Ilse von H.". The latter refers to Ilse von Hoffmanstal, alias Gabrielle Valladon.
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Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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