Edit
Cromwell (1970) Poster

(1970)

Trivia

Scenes showing Cromwell's campaign in Ireland were cut from the final movie, due to the troubles in Northern Ireland.
28 of 28 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
When writer and director Ken Hughes said to Richard Harris that no self-respecting Irishman should ever play Oliver Cromwell, Harris laughed.
22 of 22 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Richard Harris said he had a nervous breakdown during filming, and actually woke up one day thinking they were going to execute King Charles I.
16 of 16 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Richard Harris was perhaps the least likely candidate for the role of the Puritan leader who, according to many historians, carried out near genocide in Ireland. Although a fierce Irish nationalist, Harris saw past the historical circumstances and became intrigued with Cromwell as "a symbol of integrity, anxious to reform society", as the actor described him. Harris insisted it wasn't necessary for an actor to strictly believe in the character he was playing. Instead, Harris drew inspiration from Cromwell's idealistic nature, his goal to take the country out of aristocratic hands, and his "rigorous self-discipline", a trait Harris admired.
15 of 15 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Heavy make-up was used, so the actors would look like the portraits of their characters.
11 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Close to four thousand costumes were made, sixteen thousand separate prop items found or made, and thousands of wigs ordered from all over Europe.
8 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Cromwell died in 1658 at the age of fifty-nine. It is believed he died of malaria, and a urinary tract infection. In 1661, twelve years after the execution of Charles I, Cromwell's body was exhumed and posthumously beheaded.
16 of 18 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The final version of this movie, at one stage, was three hours long, but it was cut down to two hours and nineteen minutes, deleting several featured roles in the process including: Felix Aylmer (in his final movie) as an archbishop, and Bryan Pringle, Peter Bennett, Tony Caunter, and George A. Cooper.
11 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
It was Casting Director Maude Spector that first suggested Timothy Dalton for the role of Prince Rupert.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Writer and Director Ken Hughes wanted Peter Finch to play Oliver Cromwell, but the studio didn't think he was a big enough star to carry the movie.
7 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Richard Harris' salary was five hundred thousand dollars.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sir Alec Guinness (King Charles I) and Richard Harris (Oliver Cromwell) played the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius in different films: Guinness in The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964), and Harris in Gladiator (2000). Harris was originally cast as Marcus Aurelius' son Commodus in the former movie, but he was replaced by Christopher Plummer.
11 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
This movie made no mention of the Second Civil War.
7 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Sir Alec Guinness, in his memoirs, stated that he was seriously unimpressed with Timothy Dalton's behavior during the production.
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
More than two hundred workers at Shepperton Studios built the largest outdoor set ever constructed for an English-made movie, a two-acre re-creation of London's Parliament Square as it looked in 1642, complete with the House of Commons, Westminster Palace and Abbey, and roughly fifty other buildings.
4 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
During an interview on-location for the BBC Film Night show, Richard Harris claimed that he was first shown the script in 1959.
6 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
Writer and Director Ken Hughes became hooked on the subject after reading a biography of Cromwell in the early 1960s. Over the next nine years, he read more than one hundred twenty books about him and toured England in his spare time between movie jobs visiting historic sites and conducting research in museums and record offices. Hughes was determined to pull together a tragic drama that would have "all the haunting inevitability of Greek tragedy." His dream became possible when he met Irving Allen, a producer who shared his obsession with Cromwell.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The movie's main cast features two actors who have appeared twice in the James Bond film franchise. Charles Gray appeared as Bond ally Henderson in You Only Live Twice (1967) and then played villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld in Diamonds Are Forever (1971) while Timothy Dalton portrayed James Bond in both The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989). Geoffrey Keen has appeared in six Bond movies, as a recurring character: Sir Frederick Gray in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979), and as Minister of Defense in For Your Eyes Only (1981), Octopussy (1983), A View to a Kill (1985) and The Living Daylights (1987). Also, Michael Goodliffe appeared uncredited as Chief of Staff Bill Tanner in The Man with the Golden Gun (1974).
3 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink
The opening title card reads: "CAMBRIDGE, ENGLAND 1640".
3 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook   |  Twitter   |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page


Recently Viewed