Sam McCloud is a Marshal from Taos, New Mexico, who takes a temporary assignment in the New York City Police Department. His keen sense of detail and detecting subtle clues, learned from his experience, enable him to nab unsuspecting criminals despite his unbelieving boss.

Creator:

Reviews
Popularity
2,446 ( 235)

On Disc

at Amazon

Episodes

Seasons


Years



7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1977   1976   1975   1974   1973   1972   … See all »
Nominated for 6 Primetime Emmys. Another 1 win & 4 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Cannon (1971–1976)
Action | Crime | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.7/10 X  

Frank Cannon is an overweight, balding ex-cop with a deep voice and expensive tastes in culinary pleasures; he becomes a high-priced private investigator.

Stars: William Conrad, Patrick Culliton, Tom Pittman
Ironside (1967–1975)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Wheelchair-bound detective Robert T. Ironside battles the bad guys on the streets of San Francisco.

Stars: Raymond Burr, Don Galloway, Don Mitchell
Baretta (1975–1978)
Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

The cases of maverick undercover New York City detective Tony Baretta.

Stars: Robert Blake, Tom Ewell, Michael D. Roberts
Barnaby Jones (1973–1980)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

The exploits of milk-swilling, geriatric private eye Barnaby Jones.

Stars: Buddy Ebsen, Lee Meriwether, Mark Shera
Kojak (1973–1978)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

A bald, lollipop sucking police detective with a fiery righteous attitude battles crime in his city.

Stars: Telly Savalas, Dan Frazer, Kevin Dobson
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A veteran cop with more than twenty years of experience is teamed with a young Inspector to solve crimes in San Francisco, California.

Stars: Karl Malden, Michael Douglas, Reuben Collins
McMillan & Wife (1971–1977)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

San Francisco Police Commissioner Stewart "Mac" McMillan and his amateur detective wife keep their marriage unpredictable while solving the city's most baffling crimes.

Stars: Rock Hudson, John Schuck, Susan Saint James
Hawaii Five-O (1968–1980)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.4/10 X  

The investigations of Hawaii Five-0, an elite branch of the Hawaii State Police answerable only to the governor and headed by stalwart Steve McGarrett.

Stars: Jack Lord, James MacArthur, Kam Fong
Mannix (1967–1975)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Mannix worked originally for Wickersham at Intertect and then struck out on his own, assisted by Peggy Fair (whose cop-husband had been killed) and Police Department contact Tobias.

Stars: Mike Connors, Gail Fisher, Ward Wood
Quincy M.E. (1976–1983)
Crime | Drama | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

The cases of a coroner who investigates suspicious deaths that usually suggest murder.

Stars: Jack Klugman, John S. Ragin, Robert Ito
Police Woman (1974–1978)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.6/10 X  

Follows Sergeant "Pepper" Anderson, LAPD's top undercover cop. A member of the Criminal Conspiracy Unit, Pepper works the wild side of the street, where she poses as everything from a gangster's moll to a streetwalker to a prison inmate.

Stars: Angie Dickinson, Earl Holliman, Charles Dierkop
Starsky and Hutch (1975–1979)
Action | Crime | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Two streetwise cops bust criminals in their red-and-white Ford Torino, with the help of police snitch, Huggy Bear.

Stars: David Soul, Paul Michael Glaser, Antonio Fargas
Edit

Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...  Sam McCloud 46 episodes, 1970-1977
...  Peter B. Clifford / ... 45 episodes, 1970-1977
...  Sgt. Joe Broadhurst / ... 41 episodes, 1970-1977
Edit

Storyline

Sam McCloud is a town Marshal from Taos, New Mexico. He goes to New York to find an escaped criminal, and there falls for reporter Chris Coughlin, who is the cousin of the deputy police commissioner. After he tracks the criminal down, Chris convinces her cousin to request that Sam be assigned to temporary duty with the NYPD to learn modern police methods. He is assigned to the detective bureau headed by Chief Peter B. Clifford, who is less than thrilled with having McCloud under his command and gives him nothing but menial duties. Sam always winds up deep in homicides, drug busts, and various other major crimes. He is often helped out by Sgt. Joe Broadhurst, and solves them using a combination of good police work and good old country know-how. Written by Brian Washington <Sargebri@att.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

The toughest cowboy to ever take on the mean streets of New York.


Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 February 1970 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ein Sheriff in New York  »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(20 episodes) | (6 episodes) | (19 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In season one, episode one, "Who Says You Can't Make Friends in New York City?", McCloud is holding a press conference after he killed a bad guy, which would make it impossible for him to do undercover police work, as he did throughout the run of the series. See more »

Goofs

Mccloud's accent is totally wrong for someone supposedly from Taos New Mexico. Taos is located in northern New Mexico, and Anglos there do not speak in that sort of accent, but rather more or less a general American accent. See more »

Quotes

[repeated line]
Sam McCloud: *There* yuh go!
See more »

Connections

Featured in The Universal Story (1996) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Kudos for all the comments!
22 March 2004 | by See all my reviews

I love this website and all the comments on it! McCloud was my favorite TV series and still is way up there. I would love to trade with anyone who has the 90-minute episodes on home video. I have the 2-hour shows from A&E and some of the 90-minute shows from the CBS Late Movie, but fairly often I have only opening and closing credits for episodes (particularly from the poor second season, and the going-downhill seventh).

One correction: "Return to the Alamo," the best episode of the series, was directed by Walter Doniger. E.W. Swackhamer directed the next "Alamo" episode, "The Day New York Turned Blue," which is still my favorite. The first "This Must Be The Alamo" was directed by Bruce Kessler (who does an excellent job), and Dennis Weaver himself directed the last (and least available) "Alamo" episode, "'Twas The Fight Before Christmas," which among other things features "Dallas" star Linda Gray in her first major role. On re-watching this episode last Christmas, I think it may be the best in the whole series.

In my opinion, the show took a while to find its stride. The 60-minute first-season episodes, which were combined into 90-minute or 2-hour TV movies later on, are fair but a little too countrified for my taste. The second season is generally quite bad, due to writing by Peter Allan Fields (five of the seven episodes). When Glen A. Larson got back from "Alias Smith and Jones" and took over the reins in the third season, the writing got noticeably better (he scripted five of the best episodes -- the first three "Alamos," "The New Mexican Connection" and "Butch Cassidy Rides Again," as well as two of the worst -- "The Barefoot Stewardess Caper" and "Night of the Shark"). Michael Gleason was nearly as good a writer (with the fourth season's "The Colorado Cattle Caper" making the top five). Lou Shaw wasn't in their class, but turned in several good scripts ("The Man With the Golden Hat" was probably his best).

The show had more changes in theme music than any other series I know. David Shire contributed a pretty poor twangy theme song for the first two years. In year three, they had four themes in five episodes! (Two of them are "chase music" from the episodes themselves.") The show hit the mark with the fourth-season theme, which was re-arranged each season to lead off with the hard-driving music as McCloud and the horse pounded the pavement. It's my favorite theme of all time (the arrangement for season six is the best). In the seventh season, among many disappointments, the theme was cut down in the opening and used only three times over the opening credits. The 1989 "Return of Sam McCloud" reunion-film theme was forgettable and had no relation to the others. When will people learn that a good theme song and opening sequence is vital to a show's success????

The series really Jumped The Shark when Michael Sloan came on as producer and head writer during the final season. His debut, "Bonnie and McCloud," was pinned by Variety as "perhaps the sappiest episode in the entire series," and his next episode, "The Great Taxicab Stampede," is just plain idiotic. Surprisingly, his other two scripts ("'Twas The Fight Before Christmas" and "London Bridges") are pretty good; I suspect he had uncredited help and a lot of it.

Great job, fans!


5 of 5 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 11 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Stream Trending TV Series With Prime Video

Explore popular and recently added TV series available to stream now with Prime Video.

Start your free trial



Recently Viewed