Paint Your Wagon (1969) - News Poster

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Kristen Stewart signs on to play Jean Seberg in Against All Enemies

  • HeyUGuys
Personal Shopper and Twilight actress Kristen Stewart has been cast in the independent political thriller, Against All Enemies, in the role of Saint Joan actress Jean Seberg.

Stewart joins Anthony Mackie, who will portray a civil rights activist and Jack O’Connell who has been cast as an FBI agent assigned to surveil the actress. Margaret Qualley and Colm Meaney will also star. Una director, Benedict Andrews will take the helm on a script by Joe Shrapnel and Anna Waterhouse.

Also in the news – Madonna set to direct feature adaptation Taking Flight

The story will focus on attempts by the FBI to discredit Seberg through its Cointelpro program in retaliation for her support of the Black Panther Party. Those efforts included creating a false story in 1970 that the child Seberg was carrying was not fathered by her husband, but by a member of the Black Panther Party.

Seberg, whose career
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Good Evening, Mr. Ross

Steve Ross I Remember Him Well: The Songs of Alan Jay Lerner Birdland Jazz Club, NYC Monday, January 22, 2018

Lerner who?

Getting serious for a moment, this is the fact around which we will orbit: What really constitutes American culture? Literature and architecture and painting -- yes, certainly. But what particularly animates our hearts is song -- and, in particular, the living energy of the American musical theater. In that buoyant realm, there’s no greater literate master than lyricist and writer Alan Jay Lerner (1918-1986). The open-and-shut-case evidence for this assertion is his CV: On A Clear Day, Brigadoon, Gigi, Paint Your Wagon, An American In Paris (story and screen play), Camelot, and -- most famously, My Fair Lady.

Watching our black and white TV, as a child I noticed my parents (and the studio audience) were delighted by a singer I’d never heard of. I could not understand the big to-do about him.
See full article at CultureCatch »

How a low budget film led to James Cameron's Aliens

Ryan Lambie Jul 14, 2017

A cult gem in its own right, 1981's Galaxy Of Terror also gave James Cameron his start in big-screen filmmaking...

In most respects, it's pure Roger Corman: low-budget, swiftly made, and loaded with gratuitous gore and bare flesh. But take a closer look at Galaxy Of Terror, the amiably tawdry sci-fi horror flick released by Corman's New World in 1981, and you'll see the creative fingerprints of one James Cameron.

See related 8 Star Wars games we'd like to see

Directed by Bruce D Clark - who also co-wrote - Galaxy Of Terror slams together the plots of Ridley Scott's Alien and the 50s classic, Forbidden Planet. A group of explorers land on the planet Morganthus, where they discover a huge ancient pyramid; one by one, the visitors are terrorised and killed by monsters from their subconscious. One luckless character is torn apart by claws and tentacles
See full article at Den of Geek »

Early Garrel: The Holy Familiar

Mubi will be showing the retrospective Philippe Garrel: Fight for Eternity from May 1 - July 5, 2017 in most countries around the world.Les enfants désaccordésQuestion: I must ask you here about one concept you discuss in your book, one that also might be thought of, next to the structural work, as another way to break from the story in the film. The concept is muzan, and I find it quite difficult to think of a proper translation of it into English. How do you employ this concept into your films, and does it, in fact, have anything to do with the way you wish to break away from the story?

Yoshishige Yoshida: I understand the word in itself, as you would understand the literal meaning of the kanji: something which expresses the impossibility of attaining stability or change for the better. Yes, I believe this is the meaning of the concept that I use.
See full article at MUBI »

McCabe & Mrs. Miller

Robert Altman, Warren Beatty and Julie Christie join together for one of the great westerns, a poetic account of the founding of a town and the way big business preys on foolish little guys. Raw and cluttered, the show gives the genre a new look, with a dreamy mix of snowflakes, opium and the music of Leonard Cohen. McCabe & Mrs. Miller Blu-ray The Criterion Collection 827 1971 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 121 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date October 11, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Warren Beatty, Julie Christie, Rene Auberjonois, William Devane, John Schuck, Bert Remsen, Shelley Duvall, Keith Carradine, Michael Murphy, Antony Holland, . Cinematography Vilmos Zsigmond Production Designer Leon Ericksen Film Editing and Second Unit Director Louis Lombardo Original Music Leonard Cohen Written by Robert Altman, Brian McKay from the novel McCabe by Edmund Naughton Produced by Mitchell Brower, David Foster Directed by Robert Altman

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Robert Altman films run hot and cold for this reviewer.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brimstone review

Guy Pearce plays a terrifying reverend in the period drama-thriller, Brimstone. Here's our review of a brutal movie...

An apocalyptic pall hangs over this western from Dutch writer-director Martin Koolhoven, from its ominous title to its spectacular yet bleak landscapes. Some movies have a tendency to romanticise what life was like on the American frontier; Brimstone, on the other hand, is so witheringly violent that it makes Bone Tomahawk look like Paint Your Wagon.

Dakota Fanning stars as Elizabeth, a mute midwife who has the thankless task of delivering babies at a time when childbirth is fraught with danger. And on the day that one delivery goes tragically wrong, a scarred, glowering Reverend (Guy Pearce) shows up to tell Liz that she must be punished for her sins...

Koolhoven's sordid tale of abuse, sadism and revenge might be impossible to sit through were it not for construction: the opening 40 minutes introduces its two leads,
See full article at Den of Geek »

[Venice Review] The Bleeder

The Bleeder looks a bit familiar. A film of browns and greens; disco music and ‘70s rock tunes; big haircuts and even bigger lapels. Indeed, in a way reminiscent of recent period efforts such as Black Mass and David O. Russell’s last two outings, The Bleeder is drenched in that particular decade’s elaborate trappings. It also owes a lot to the school of Scorsese, complete with wise-guy narration, east-coast working-class lilts, and a sense of “You gotta be shitting me! Is this really my life?” But it’s a sports film at heart and a rather good one at that, all plucky underdog right hooks and tragic, humiliating falls. In a way, it’s also a film about movies, too. Coming from decorated Québécois filmmaker Philippe Falardeau, it is the true life story of Chuck “The Bayonne Bleeder” Wepner, the man who fought Muhammed Ali after the champ
See full article at The Film Stage »

Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

5th Avenue Theatre's Starry Paint Your Wagon Opens Tonight

The 5th Avenue Theatre presents an exciting new 'revisal' of the sweeping saga Lerner amp Loewe's Paint Your Wagon. Featuring an all-new book by Pulitzer Prize nominee John Marans, this show has taken an incredible journey over the last five years from developmental workshops to The 5th Avenue stage this season. And BroadwayWorld is happy to report that the company has just announced the full cast and creative team.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

In the French Style

It's a genuine forgotten gem: American student Jean Seberg's five-year adventure in Paris is mostly a period of romantic frustration. Irwin Shaw and Robert Parrish's look at the problems of an independent woman is remarkably insightful; the chronically miscast and underused Ms. Seberg is luminous. In the French Style Blu-ray Twilight Time Limited Edition 1963 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 105 min. / Ship Date April 12, 2016 / available through Twilight Time Movies / 29.95 Starring Jean Seberg, Stanley Baker, Phillippe Forquet, Addison Powell, Jack Hedley, Maurice Teynac, Claudine Auger, James Leo Herlihy, Ann Lewis, Barbara Sommers. Cinematography Michel Kelber Original Music Joseph Kosma Written by Irwin Shaw from his short stories Produced by Irwin Shaw, Robert Parrish Directed by Robert Parrish

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Talk about elusive movies: on must keep an eye on the TCM logs to catch many of the films of director Robert Parrish. I had to wait for the advent of
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

March Madness: "Batman V. Superman" - Is There A Joker In The Deck?

  • CinemaRetro
"Batman v. Superman": potential blockbuster or "Cleopatra Redux".

By Lee Pfeiffer

The heavily-hyped Warner Brothers super hero epic "Batman V. Superman:  Dawn of Justice" is one of the most heavily promoted films in years. It's also one of the most expensive. Variety estimates that the film's $250 million production budget plus ancillary marketing costs will make it necessary for the movie to gross $800 worldwide just to break even. You read that right: $800 million. One industry analyst says that anything less than a gross of $1 billion will be considered a disappointment. Warner Brothers contends that those figures don't take into consideration ancillary revenues from video and merchandising. Fair enough, but if a film bombs, generally speaking, the merchandise and video sales do, too. If you doubt it, how many people did you see walking around with "Waterworld" or "Howard the Duck" T shirts? Veteran screenwriter William Goldman once said of the film industry "Nobody knows anything.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscar’S Year Of Visual Effects, and The Art Of Seeing And Believing

If you have been living and routinely interacting with other human beings over the last month, you’ve probably heard one or two words involving this year’s Academy Awards and the heated controversy over the startling lack of both films and people of color among the nominees. Personally, I think that the real focus of concern ought to be less on the back end-- awards handed out for films which were financed and/or studio-approved, scheduled for production and filmed perhaps as much as two or three years ago-- and more on addressing the lack of cultural and intellectual and experiential diversity among those who have the power to make the decisions as to what films get made in the first place. This is no sure-fire way to ensure that there will be a richer and more consistent representation of diverse creative voices when it comes time for Hollywood
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

12 Badass Exploitation Films You Need To See Before You Die

Jerry Gross Organization

It seems hard to believe, given their recent output, but there was a time when the major studios considered themselves to be above exploiting lurid subject matter.

Studio movies had big budgets, big stars and, in an attempt to lure viewers away from their TV sets, widescreen colour cinematography. In keeping with the Hays Production Code, they did not depict sex and nudity, bloody gore or violence.

What changed their minds were independent filmmakers like Herschell Gordon Lewis and Roger Corman, whose low budget exploitation pictures made millions while Hollywood continued turning out costly flops such as Cleopatra and Paint Your Wagon. The times, as well as audiences, were changing, and Hollywood had to change with them.

Much has been made about the audience for pictures like The Sound Of Music turning its back on Hollywood, but you could also say that Tinseltown forgot those viewers and
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

A history of stoners in film

Ahead of American Ultra’s release in UK cinemas, we look at the rise of the stoner in film, from the 30s to the present...

"The motion picture you are about to witness may startle you. It would not have been possible, otherwise, to sufficiently emphasize the frightful toll of the new drug menace which is destroying the youth of America in alarmingly increasing numbers. Marihuana is that drug - a violent narcotic - an unspeakable scourge - the Real Public Enemy Number One!

So reads the opening crawl to the now infamous film Reefer Madness. Originally released in 1936, it was designed as a hard-hitting expose of marijuana and its inherent dangers. The drug could cause "violent, uncontrollable laughter," the movie's introduction read. It could induce "dangerous hallucinations," "monstrous extravagances," all eventually leading to "shocking acts of physical violence... ending often in incurable insanity."

Reefer Madness was one of many
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Transparent,’ ‘Empire’ Lead Casting Society of America’s Artios Awards Nominations

Transparent” and “Empire” lead the first-round nominees for the Casting Society of America’s 31st annual Artios Awards.

The Amazon comedy and Fox drama each scored two nominations. The noms announced Friday morning covered TV, theater, Web series and short film.

Transparent’s” casting director Edye Belasco received noms in both the TV pilot comedy and TV comedy series categories. “Empire’s” trio of Leah Daniels Butler, Claire Simon and Shelby Cherniet were nominated for TV pilot drama, while Butler and Simon were also recognized in the TV drama series field.

The TV comedy series category also includes “Orange Is the New Black,” “Veep,” “Silicon Valley” and “Episodes,” while the TV drama series contenders are “Game of Thrones,” “House of Cards,” “The Good Wife” and “Bloodline.”

In the TV movie or miniseries category, the nominees are “American Horror Story: Freak Show,” “Olive Kitteridge,” “Wayward Pines,” “Wolf Hall” and “The Slap.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Cinema Retro Presents: "The American Westerns Of Clint Eastwood" Special Issue

  • CinemaRetro
Cinema Retro proudly presents its latest "Movie Classics" special edition issue: "The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood", the perfect companion to our acclaimed special issue dedicated to the three Clint Eastwood Westerns directed by Sergio Leone.

"The American Westerns of Clint Eastwood" is a 116 page limited edition publication. Each of Eastwood's American Westerns is covered in detail in individual chapters:

"Hang "Em High" "Paint Your Wagon" "Two Mules for Sister Sara" "The Beguiled" "Joe Kidd" "High Plains Drifter" The Outlaw Josey Wales" "Pale Rider" "Unforgiven" Special section covering early film roles and TV Western appearances

Featuring hundreds of photographs, rare behind-the-scenes stills an movie poster art, including location photos (then and now) and even props that exist to this day in private collections!!

We are also very honored to present unseen movie poster designs by the legendary Bill Gold, who has overseen the advertising campaigns for most of Eastwood's films
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Oscar Nominated Moody Pt.2: From Fagin to Merlin - But No Harry Potter

Ron Moody as Fagin in 'Oliver!' based on Charles Dickens' 'Oliver Twist.' Ron Moody as Fagin in Dickens musical 'Oliver!': Box office and critical hit (See previous post: "Ron Moody: 'Oliver!' Actor, Academy Award Nominee Dead at 91.") Although British made, Oliver! turned out to be an elephantine release along the lines of – exclamation point or no – Gypsy, Star!, Hello Dolly!, and other Hollywood mega-musicals from the mid'-50s to the early '70s.[1] But however bloated and conventional the final result, and a cast whose best-known name was that of director Carol Reed's nephew, Oliver Reed, Oliver! found countless fans.[2] The mostly British production became a huge financial and critical success in the U.S. at a time when star-studded mega-musicals had become perilous – at times downright disastrous – ventures.[3] Upon the American release of Oliver! in Dec. 1968, frequently acerbic The
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

A Nearly Unrecognizable Justin Guarini Stars in New Diet Dr Pepper Commercial

A Nearly Unrecognizable Justin Guarini Stars in New Diet Dr Pepper Commercial
Does the guy in the new Diet Dr Pepper commercial look familiar to you?

Early American Idol fans, rejoice – it's none other than Justin Guarini.

The 36-year-old singer and Broadway actor stars in the soda ad as "Lil' Sweet."

The commercial depicts a woman looking for a low-calorie but still-sweet beverage. Cue Guarini, who comes sliding in on his knees, dressed in a red wig and shiny metallic pants and hands her a Diet Dr Pepper.

The woman asks if Guarini works at the office and he sings back his response.

"No, Lil' Sweet is self-employed," he says as he
See full article at People.com - TV Watch »

Photo Coverage: Inside the Closing Night Reception of Encores! Paint Your Wagon

Two-time Tony nominee Keith Carradine starred in the Encores production of Paint Your Wagon, which closed last night, March 22, alongside Alexandra Socha and Justin Guarini. The show, set in a mining camp in Gold Rush-era California, is the story of a dreaming gold miner and his daughter whose world is changed when the daughter finds gold-and love-near their camp. Check out photos from the closing night reception below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Photo Coverage: Encores! Paint Your Wagon Takes Closing Night Bows

Two-time Tony nominee Keith Carradine starred in the Encores production of Paint Your Wagon, which closed last night, March 22, alongside Alexandra Socha and Justin Guarini. The show, set in a mining camp in Gold Rush-era California, is the story of a dreaming gold miner and his daughter whose world is changed when the daughter finds gold-and love-near their camp. Check out photos from the closing night below
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »
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