Midnight Cowboy (1969) - News Poster

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‘Midnight Cowboy’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

Stars: Dustin Hoffman, Jon Voight, Sylvia Miles, John McGiver, Georgann Johnson | Written by Waldo Salt | Directed by John Schlesinger

“Where’s that Joe Buck?” the Texan locals ask. Here he is: it’s Jon Voight, a New Yorker playing a Deep Southern wannabe gigolo in flamboyant cowboy getup. Voight looks as pretty as his daughter playing the doe-eyed Joe, who ditches his grimy cafe job and sets off for the Big Apple to make a living sleeping with wealthy older women, while Fred Neil’s insufferably catchy “Everybody’s Talkin’” hums on the soundtrack.

Joe is confident and fearless, simple and childlike, but NYC isn’t all he hoped. Nothing of what he hoped. He’s a fish out of water. Shot from low angles, Manhattan appears more vertical and dwarfing than ever (Joe was the tallest structure back in Texas). This is Manhattan from a much scuzzier era: all neon vice and deviancy,
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Blue Denim

Let’s go back to 1959, when just implying that two teenagers might have first-hand knowledge of sex is socially unacceptable dynamite. This adapted play about an unwanted teen pregnancy is actually quite good, thanks to fine performances by Carol Lynley and Brandon De Wilde, who convince as cherubic high schoolers ‘too young to know the score.’ And hey, the teen trauma is set to the intense music of composer Bernard Herrmann.

Blue Denim

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1959 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 89 min. / Street Date April 17, 2018 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95

Starring: Carol Lynley, Brandon De Wilde, Macdonald Carey, Marsha Hunt, Warren Berlinger, Vaughn Taylor, Roberta Shore, Malcolm Atterbury, Anthony J. Corso, Gregg Martell, William Schallert.

Cinematography: Leo Tover

Film Editors: William Reynolds, George Leggewie

Original Music: Bernard Herrmann

Written by Edith Sommer, Philip Dunne from the play by James Leo Herlihy and William Noble

Produced by Charles Brackett

Directed
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Little Murders

The blackest of black comedies confronts us with an urban worst case scenario — Jules Feiffer’s ‘social horror’ movie is like a sitcom in Hell, with citizens numbed and trembling over the unending meaningless violence. What was nasty satire in 1971 now plays like the 6 o’clock news. Too radical for its time, Feiffer and director Alan Arkin’s picture is more painfully funny, and frightening, than ever.

Little Murders

Region B Blu-ray

Powerhouse Indicator (UK)

1971 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date April 30, 2017 / Available from Amazon UK £22.99

Starring: Elliott Gould, Marcia Rodd, Vincent Gardenia, Elizabeth Wilson, Jon Korkes, John Randolph, Doris Roberts, Lou Jacobi, Donald Sutherland, Alan Arkin, Martin Kove.

Cinematography: Gordon Willis

Film Editor: Howard Kuperman

Production Design: Gene Rudolf

Original Music: Fred Kaz

Written by Jules Feiffer from his play

Produced by Jack Brodsky (and Elliott Gould)

Directed by Alan Arkin

Little Murders was one of the first new
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Midnight Cowboy”

Midnight Cowboy is about a man with big dreams and plenty of ambition but not nearly enough brains or wisdom to do anything right. As he moves from Texas to New York seeking to become, of all things, a male prostitute, he falls in with a local hustler that attempts to teach him how to survive in the big city even though he’s just barely doing enough on his own. When the moment finally happens for the Texas cowboy he still comes up short and eventually finds a way to get him and his friend out of town. However, on

10 Things You Didn’t Know about “Midnight Cowboy
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Movie Poster of the Week: Midnight Marauder’s Top 10 Favorite Movie Posters

  • MUBI
Above: Us festival one sheet for Hal (Amy Scott, USA, 2018). Designed by Midnight Marauder.One of the best and most inventive movie poster designers currently at work, the L.A.-based artist known as Midnight Marauder should be no stranger to followers of my Movie Poster of the Day Tumblr and annual top 10 lists. A graphic designer for some 20 years, Mm a.k.a. Emmanuel, has been designing movie posters for the past five years. He has had two very fruitful collaborations in that time, first with Terrence Malick for whom he has designed a number of posters, most notably the teaser for Knight of Cups, and more recently with the great Berlin-based Italian illustrator Tony Stella with whom he has been producing beautiful alternative posters for films like The Phantom Thread. Together they also designed the poster for the 50th anniversary release of The Great Silence, which opens in theaters today.
See full article at MUBI »

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?

Will ‘The Shape of Water’ be the ninth Best Picture Oscar champ not to win any of its three-plus acting nominations?
The Shape of Water” is one of two Best Picture Oscar nominees with three acting nominations — the other being “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri” — but star Sally Hawkins and supporting players Octavia Spencer and Richard Jenkins are not predicted to win any of them. If they indeed go 0-3 on Sunday and “The Shape of Water” takes the top prize, the fantasy drama will join eight other Best Picture champs that did not convert any of its three-plus acting nominations into wins.

“Birdman” (2014) was the most recent Best Picture winner not to carry an acting award from at least three nominations, as Michael Keaton, Emma Stone and Edward Norton fell to Eddie Redmayne (“The Theory of Everything”), Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”) and J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”), respectively. Arquette and Simmons were the supporting frontrunners all season, but Keaton was locked in a tight Best Actor race with Redmayne until the SAG Awards
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Criterion in May 2018: Midnight Cowboy, Moonrise, Mishima and More

In the immortal words of Harry Nilsson, "everybody's talkin'" about Midnight Cowboy, the first X-rated movie to win an Academy Award. In fact, the film won three Oscars -- Best Picture, Best Director (John Schlesinger), and best adapted script (Waldo Salt). Jon Voight and Dustin Hoffman were nominated, but lost out to John Wayne.  The film's rating was later revised to R, but it remains a potent portrait of America in the late 60s admidst a collision of naive optimism and hopeless cynicism. (My first impression of the film was, admittedly, permanently imprinted on my brain from a Mad Magazine parody.) And now it's coming to the Criterion Collection.  Midnight Cowboy is one of seven -- count 'em, seven! -- films due to arrive from...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

‘Midnight Cowboy,’ ‘Graduation,’ ‘Au hasard Balthazar,’ and More to Join the Criterion Collection

  • Indiewire
‘Midnight Cowboy,’ ‘Graduation,’ ‘Au hasard Balthazar,’ and More to Join the Criterion Collection
May is going to be a good month for fans of the Romanian New Wave, as Cristian Mungiu’s two most recent films are both joining the Criterion Collection. “Graduation” and “Beyond the Hills” will be released alongside new additions “Midnight Cowboy,” “The Other Side of Hope,” and “Moonrise”; “Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters” and “Au hasard Balthazar,” which have already been released on DVD, are getting Blu-ray upgrades.

“Au hasard Balthazar”

“A profound masterpiece from one of the most revered filmmakers in the history of cinema, director Robert Bresson’s ‘Au hasard Balthazar’ follows the donkey Balthazar as he is passed from owner to owner, some kind and some cruel but all with motivations outside of his understanding. Balthazar, whose life parallels that of his first keeper, Marie, is truly a beast of burden, suffering the sins of humankind. But despite his powerlessness, he accepts his fate nobly.
See full article at Indiewire »

A Best Picture Oscar Campaign Costs Millions, But Gains the Winner Almost Nothing at the Box Office

  • Indiewire
Every year, Hollywood spends millions chasing little gold men. The Academy Award is the film industry’s highest honor — unless you’re the box office, in which case it’s a trivial pursuit. IndieWire surveyed 89 years of Best Picture winners and nominees, and discovered that in the last two decades, the top-grossing domestic film corresponded with the Best Picture winner exactly once, with “The Lord of the Rings” in 2003. (Before that, odds were substantially better; it happened more than 25% of the time.)

Similarly, until recently almost every Best Picture winner was one of the year’s top 20 domestic grossers; in the last seven years, only one winner can claim that bragging right: 2011 Best Picture winner “The King’s Speech,” which earned $135 million and a No. 18 slot. Other placements range from No. 22 (2013 winner “Argo,” $136 million) to No. 92 (2017 winner “Moonlight,” $27.5 million).

Read More:2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture

This year has only a
See full article at Indiewire »

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?

2018 Oscars: Does Best Picture champ have to win an acting award first?
The Shape of Water” numbers three acting bids among its leading 13 Academy Awards nominations for lead Sally Hawkins and supporting players Richard Jenkins and Octavia Spencer. According to our exclusive Oscar odds none of them is predicted to win on March 4. Should that scenario play out, does that mean that their film won’t win Best Picture?

Not so fast.

While 53 of the 89 Best Picture champs to date include an Oscar-winning performance, 36 of them (40%) did not win any acting awards. And among those three dozen winners are four of the eight films — “The Hurt Locker” (2009), “Argo” (2012), “Birdman” (2015) and “Spotlight” (2016) — decided by preferential ballot under the newly expanded slate of Best Picture nominees.

Surprisingly, an even dozen of the Best Picture winners did not even reap any acting nominations. That is welcome news for “Arrival,” which does not number an acting bid among its eight nominations. However, four of those films
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be taken down by snub of director Martin McDonagh?

Oscars: Will ‘Three Billboards’ be taken down by snub of director Martin McDonagh?
There are Oscar snubs and there are killer Oscar snubs. The absence of Martin McDonagh from the ballot for Best Director may prove to be the latter. His film, “Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri,” has been building momentum throughout the precursor awards, dominating at the Golden Globes and SAG and tallying seven other Academy Award nominations. But it hit the wall Tuesday morning.

It is rare for a movie to win Best Picture when its director is ignored, especially when it’s up against a film — “The Shape of Water” — that has nearly twice as many total nominations, including one for its director Guillermo del Toro.

Only four times in Oscar history has a movie won without a directing nomination, and just once this century. That was in 2013 for left-out Ben Affleck’s “Argo.” Prior to that, it was the 1990 “Driving Miss Daisy,” which had nine nominations but none for its director Bruce Beresford.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Exclusive Interview with Jon Voight for ‘Surviving the Wild’

Jon Voight is an academy award winning actor who’s career has spanned more than four decades. He is best known for his performances in films such as Midnight Cowboy (1969) and Deliverance (1972), but with his new award-winning TV series Ray Donovan (2013- ) renewed for another series and film Surviving the Wild receiving critical acclaim, Jon Voight is proving he is still at the top of his game. With the release of his new film Surviving the Wild, I was fortunate enough to get some time to talk with Jon about what attracted him to the role, working with his co-star Aiden Cullen and his favourite scenes to film.

I would like to ask you a few questions today about Surviving the Wild. What attracted you to the role originally?

I was given a first draft script and sometimes when these scripts come out the author gets inspired by something. That first draft says everything.
See full article at Blogomatic3000 »

10 Cinematography Masters Who Love Celluloid, from ‘Dunkirk’ to ‘Wonder Woman’

  • Indiewire
10 Cinematography Masters Who Love Celluloid, from ‘Dunkirk’ to ‘Wonder Woman’
The romance with film turned a corner this year with the massive success of Christopher Nolan’s “Dunkirk.” The World War II actioner had the widest 70mm release in 25 years (125 prints, dominated by IMAX), grabbing $188 million domestically and $525 million worldwide. And the visual impact of the IMAX format was powerful in the best picture frontrunner. Whether by land, by air, or by sea, the imagery was immersive. That is why Dutch-Swedish cinematographer Hoyte van Hoytema is the frontrunner in his race as well.

But the impact of film on the cinematography race doesn’t stop there. Also in strong contention are “The Beguiled,” “Call Me By Your Name,” “Wonder Struck,” and “Wonder Woman,” all period pieces shot in a variety of styles that particularly benefited from the texture and warmth of 35mm film. At the same time, “The Post,” “Murder on the Orient Express” (another 70mm spectacle), “The Florida Project,
See full article at Indiewire »

Scarecrow

We’re on the road again with a pair of eccentric new-age hobos, the kind that just can’t hack it in polite society. Gene Hackman and Al Pacino’s conflicting acting styles get a workout in Jerry Schatzberg’s tale of drifters cursed with iffy goals; Vilmos Zsigmond’s Panavision cinematography helped it earn a big prize at Cannes.

Scarecrow

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1973 / Color / 2:40 widescreen / 112 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Gene Hackman, Al Pacino, Dorothy Tristan, Ann Wedgeworth, Richard Lynch, Eileen Brennan, Penny Allen, Richard Hackman, Al Cingolani, Rutanya Alda.

Cinematography: Vilmos Zsigmond

Film Editor: Evan Lottman, Craig McKay

Production Design: Albert Brenner

Original Music: Fred Myrow

Written by Garry Michael White

Produced by Robert M. Sherman

Directed by Jerry Schatzberg

Movie-wise, everything was up in the air in the early 1970s. The view from Westwood in West Los Angeles, then the place to go see a film,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

"It Changed Everything": Five Dustin Hoffman Accusers Tell Harrowing Stories of Sexually Predatory Behavior

Over the course of a remarkable seven-decade career, Dustin Hoffman, 80, has scaled heights seen by just a handful of actors. He has earned seven Oscar nominations for films like The Graduate, Midnight Cowboy, Tootsie, Kramer vs. Kramer and Rain Man — winning statuettes for the latter two. On Nov. 27, that career was feted with a special tribute at the Gotham Awards. Hoffman's "wide range of roles — often portraying antiheroes or the marginalized — have firmly placed him amongst the most compelling actors to have graced the screen," explained Ifp executive director Joana Vicente of the honor.

But...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time

‘Wonderstruck’: Todd Haynes Blows Up Cinema, One Genre at a Time
Maybe Todd Haynes has always been too smart for his own good. The 56-year-old director has been making films for nearly 40 years, but in some ways he’s still the Brown semiotics grad who can’t resist the siren’s call of form. As he admits, “I like to set up obstacles at times, because movies are ultimately about what the spectator brings to them.”

That would seem to make him an unlikely candidate to direct a young-adult adaptation, but his “Carol” and “Velvet Goldmine” costume designer Sandy Powell knew better. When she discovered Brian Selznick’s 2011 graphic novel “Wonderstruck,” which intertwines stories from 1927 and 1977 in a young-adult mystery with little dialogue, she encouraged him to adapt it for Haynes on spec.

Indeed, Haynes found the “Wonderstruck” screenplay downright Haynesian. “Brian’s script was so ornately and attentively cinematic,” he said. “Not just the movie references, but the use of
See full article at Indiewire »

Criterion Reflections – Episode 3 – Spring 1969

Criterion Reflections is David Blakeslee’s ongoing project to watch all of the films included in the Criterion Collection in chronological order of their original release. Each episode features panel conversations and 1:1 interviews offering insights on movies that premiered in a particular season of a year in the past, which were destined to eventually bear the Criterion imprint. In this episode, David is joined by Jordan Essoe, Trevor Berrett, Keith Enright, John Laubinger, and Robert Taylor to discuss five titles from the Spring of 1969: Ingmar Bergman’s The Rite, Louis Malle’s Calcutta, Dennis Hopper’s Easy Rider, Masahiro Shinoda’s Double Suicide and John Schlesinger’s Midnight Cowboy.

Episode Time Markers: Introduction: 0:00:00 – 0:11:00 The Rite: 0:11:01 – 0:45:20 Calcutta: 0:45:21 – 1:02:12 Easy Rider: 1:02:13 – 2:00:17 Double Suicide: 2:00:18 – 2:33:06 Midnight Cowboy: 2:33:
See full article at CriterionCast »

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

One of the best pictures to come out of Hollywood in the late 1960s, Sydney Pollack’s screen version of Horace McCoy’s hardboiled novel is a harrowing experience guaranteed to elicit extreme responses. Jane Fonda performs (!) at the top of an ensemble of stars suffering in a Depression-Era circle of Hell – it’s an Annihilating Drama with a high polish. And this CineSavant review ends with a fact-bomb that ought to start Barbara Steele fans off on a new vault search.

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 120 min. / Street Date September 5, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Susannah York, Gig Young, Red Buttons, Bonnie Bedelia, Bruce Dern, Allyn Ann McLerie.

Cinematography: Philip H. Lathrop

Production Designer: Harry Horner

Film Editor: Fredric Steinkamp

Written by James Poe, Robert E. Thompson from the novel They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Hour of the Gun

It’s the one saga of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral that puts Western legend into proper perspective as to the nature of money, power and the law: Edward Anhalt’s vision is of a gangland turf war with sagebrush and whiskey bottles. James Garner is a humorless Wyatt Earp, matched by Jason Robards’ excellent Doc Holliday. It’s one of John Sturges’ best movies.

Hour of the Gun

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1967 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 101 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: James Garner, Jason Robards, Robert Ryan, Albert Salmi, Charles Aidman, Steve Ihnat, Michael Tolan, William Windom, Lonny Chapman, Larry Gates, William Schallert, Jon Voight.

Cinematography: Lucien Ballard

Art Direction: Alfred C. Ybarra

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Edward Anhalt

Produced and Directed by John Sturges

Producer-director John SturgesHour of the Gun was a dismal non-performer in
See full article at Trailers from Hell »
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