7.6/10
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2 user

The Lonely Profession (1969)

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Harry Guardino ... Leo Gordon
Dean Jagger ... Charles Van Cleve
Barbara McNair ... Donna Travers
Joseph Cotten ... Martin Bannister
Ina Balin ... Karen Menardos
Dina Merrill ... Beatrice Savarona
Jack Carter ... Freddie Farber
Troy Donahue ... Julian Thatcher
Stephen McNally ... Lt. Joseph Webber
Fernando Lamas ... Dominic Savarona
Kermit Murdock ... Senator
Hal Hopper Hal Hopper ... Savarona's Chauffer
Vince Williams Vince Williams
Duane Grey
John S. Ragin John S. Ragin ... Mr. Sutton - FBI
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Storyline

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Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 October 1969 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Oman onnensa nojassa See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character Dominic Savarona was based on reclusive tycoon Howard Hughes. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A middle-aged private detective searches for the murderer of a beautiful woman with whom he had a one-night stand.
16 April 2012 | by connie-ciampanelliSee all my reviews

I first saw "The Lonely Profession" as a teenager in 1969, when it aired as a movie of the week on NBC. It cannot on any level be classified as a great movie, but I responded viscerally to its main character, Leo Gordon, brilliantly portrayed by the underrated Harry Guardino.

Especially affective is the opening, with Leo walking in a mass of people down a San Francisco street, the camera slowly closing in on him and his tired, lonely face as those in the background fade into a blur. On the soundtrack as the opening credits roll we hear the beautiful and magnificent Barbara McNair singing the sixties pop hit" (If You're Going to) San Francisco."

I've tried unsuccessfully for years to locate a copy of the movie and a recording of McNair's rendition. Perhaps it's just as well. Both live fondly in my memory and the revisit may be disappointing.


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