6.5/10
1,754
30 user 11 critic

Goodbye, Columbus (1969)

An intelligent graduate and working-class army veteran has an affair and clashes with a 'nouveau riche' young woman, who does not care about birth control or the use of any other precautions to avoid pregnancy.

Director:

Larry Peerce

Writers:

Philip Roth (novel), Arnold Schulman
Reviews
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Richard Benjamin ... Neil Klugman
Ali MacGraw ... Brenda Patimkin
Jack Klugman ... Ben Patimkin
Nan Martin ... Mrs. Ben Patimkin
Michael Meyers ... Ron Patimkin
Lori Shelle Lori Shelle ... Julie Patimkin
Monroe Arnold Monroe Arnold ... Uncle Leo
Kay Cummings Kay Cummings ... Doris Klugman
Sylvie Strause Sylvie Strause ... Aunt Gladys
Royce Wallace Royce Wallace ... Carlotta
Anthony McGowan Anthony McGowan ... Boy in Library
Mari Gorman ... Laura Simpson Sockaloe
Chris Schenkel Chris Schenkel ... Voice on Columbus Record (voice)
Jay Jostyn Jay Jostyn ... Voice on Columbus Record (voice)
Jan Peerce ... Uncle Manny
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Storyline

A Jewish man and a Jewish woman meet and while attracted to each other, find that their worlds are very different. She is the archtypical Jewish American Princess, very emotionally involved with her parents' world, and the world they have created for her, while he is much less dependent on his family. They begin an affair, which brings more differences to the surface. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Every father's daughter is a virgin.

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Barbara Parkins and Natalie Wood were both offered the role of Brenda but declined. See more »

Goofs

At one point Chris Schenkel mentions the "red and white" in reference to Ohio State. Anyone who was ever near Columbus (or followed the Ohio State-Michigan rivalry) knows that the colors are "scarlet and gray". (The incorrect "red/white" reference to the Ohio State Buckeyes comes from Philip Roth's book itself; see in Chapter 7, page 104, line 7 from the top [Houghton Mifflin Co. edition, 1959].) See more »

Quotes

Brenda Patimkin: Look, I'm not gonna take the pills, and that's the end of it. In the first place, you don't just *take* the pills: you have to start taking them at a specific time.
Neil Klugman: You get a diaphragm.
See more »

Connections

References Rosemary's Baby (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

Wives and Lovers
(uncredited)
Music by Burt Bacharach
[Instrumental version plays on Ron's stereo]
See more »

User Reviews

 
A story of choice in a young man's life
18 September 2005 | by cgrmanSee all my reviews

Truly a period piece, Goodbye, Columbus is, certainly, an attempt to show the differences between two people of the Jewish religion. While I agree with many of the folks that commented on this film regarding the differences between Brenda's family and Neil's family, I don't see it as a matter of the wealthier character's family having no class and the poorer character having much more. I knew many families that were similar. My upbringing was more similar to Neil's as we were not wealthy. Klugman convey's the typical successful Jewish business man with a good heart. He works hard to provide a very comfortable environment for his wife and children. He is a very loving father and doesn't flaunt his wealth in the film. His family means everything to him. Benjamin's character, while exposed on occasion to the "good life", is content in knowing that he's OK despite his modest position in life. What's important in this film is that he knows there may be something in life that is better than working in a library, but he's not about to sell his soul to get rich just for the sake of being able to live the Potimkin's lifestyle. This film accurately portrays a young man early in his career and life and one of his early attempts at choosing between a safe secure future by marrying a beautiful, intelligent and not-too-spoiled Jewish girl or trying to see if he's really in love with HER and not the family money or trappings. This was a relatively low budget film that made you think. It tried to show how tough it is for a poorer man to deal with his demons in choosing the kind of woman and life he wanted. All in all, this film is an accurate slice of life in the Jewish community and is as relevant today as it was then.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 May 1969 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Goodbye, Columbus See more »

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Box Office

Gross USA:

$22,939,805
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Willow Tree See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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