A light-hearted picture of middle-aged love and friendship.

Director:

Paul Mazursky
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 8 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Natalie Wood ... Carol Sanders
Robert Culp ... Bob Sanders
Elliott Gould ... Ted Henderson
Dyan Cannon ... Alice Henderson
Horst Ebersberg ... Horst
Lee Bergere ... Emilio
Donald F. Muhich ... Psychiatrist
Noble Lee Holderread Jr. ... Sean Sanders
K.T. Stevens ... Phyllis
Celeste Yarnall ... Susan
Lynn Borden ... Cutter
Linda Burton Linda Burton ... Stewardess
Greg Mullavey ... Tim - Group Leader
Andre Philippe Andre Philippe ... Oscar
Diane Berghoff Diane Berghoff ... Myrna
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Storyline

Documentary-filmmaker Bob Sanders and his wife Carol attend a group-therapy session that serves as the backdrop for the film's opening scenes. Returning to their Los Angeles home, the newly "enlightened" couple chastise their closest friends, Ted and Alice, for not coming to grips with their true feelings. Bob insists that everyone "feel" rather than intellectualize their emotions, and Carol pronounces "that's beautiful" after anyone says anything even remotely personal. Ted and Alice humor their friends, but a good-natured sexual tension is obviously at work among the foursome. Written by filmfactsman

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Taglines:

Consider the Possibilities See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In 1973, US network ABC developed this movie into a sitcom, Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice (1973). It aired for seven episodes before it was canceled due to awful ratings and reviews. Most of the subtext about wife-swapping was eliminated, predictably (since it was 1973 and they couldn't really explore issues like that on network television). The series is most noteworthy for casting a young Jodie Foster as Elizabeth Henderson, Ted and Alice's daughter. See more »

Goofs

In the psychiatrist scene, Alice is sitting directly across from the shrink. But in her close-ups, her chin is raised and she is obviously talking "up" to the camera. See more »

Quotes

Bob Sanders: That's gorgeous, man. The truth is always beautiful.
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Soundtracks

What the World Needs Now Is Love
by Hal David and Burt Bacharach
Vocal by Jackie DeShannon
Courtesy of Liberty Records, Inc.
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User Reviews

An anti-Sixties '60s film
25 July 2001 | by krumskiSee all my reviews

Any film made during the "Swinging Sixties" is almost sure to look silly to us today - a plethora of "groovy man"s as well as doped-up pontifications about "letting it all hang out" and becoming one of the "beautiful people", all served up with garish camera tricks and gaudy production design. You know, "Austin Powers" but without the wink-wink knowingness.

(NOTE: To see how a so-called "classic" can be killed by the passage of time - and the absence of pharmaceuticals in one's system - check out "Easy Rider". That is, if you can stand it.)

On the surface, "B&C&T&A" seems to be in line with such films: it is, after all, how a quartet of middle class "squares" become indoctrinated into the hippie values of free love and "doing your own thing." However, the film uses that set-up as a means to deflate - gently and good naturedly - those very values. For, as the group becomes more uninhibited and "with it," the more goofy and ridiculous they all seem. This is particularly true of Robert Culp and Natalie Wood (Bob and Carol), as they take on the hippie philosophy full-bore and unquestionably. Casting here is impeccable: seeing the square-jawed, All-American looking Culp (then the epitome of middle-brow, as star of "I Spy") utter lines straight out of the Dennis Hopper - Peter Fonda playbook is just unutterably funny; he's got the words all right, but the music is woefully wrong. Same thing with Natalie Wood; can there be anyone more whitebread than her? The more she attempts to be "groovy" the more perfectly square she seems, particularly as Carol appears to just be parroting everything her husband says and does in adopting this new lifestyle. Quite the opposite of "liberation", wouldn't you say?

Perhaps funnier, though, are Elliot Gould and Dyan Cannon as Ted and Alice, since they get to register all the (comic) shock and horror of their friends' complete abandonment of rationality. And the equally strong undercurrents of jealousy that their friends are getting to enjoy all the freedom and sexual gratification that they themselves, as good well-behaved members of society - are missing out on. Cannon's neurotic sessions with her psychiatrist - where she continually broaches, and then backs off of, what's really troubling her - provide wonderful moments of comic denial and delusion.

What the film ultimately exposes is the moral vacuity of much of the hippie philosophy - that happiness and feeling good about oneself are not all there is to life, and that focusing too narrowly on them leads ultimately to emptiness. It also makes the subtle point, however, that much of what might initially have been good about hippie thought (or at least, the thoughts of those who inspired the hippies in the first place) was oversimplified and thereby corrupted when the middle class tried to incorporate it, seizing only upon those elements of it which seemed "fun" or "a turn-on" to them. Let's face it: how much of the so-called Woodstock Nation really had any deep political or philosophical commitments; most were just middle class kids turned on to the immediate buzz of easy drugs, free sex, and rebellion for its own sake. Likewise, cosmetic changes such as longer hair or listening to rock'n'roll didn't necessarily change the minds or policies of many in the power structure. As John Lennon said in 1971: "The Sixties didn't change anything. The same b***ards are in power now, it's just they've all got long hair."

I don't mean to suggest that the film gets into issues like this directly; it is never less than a pleasant and even sunny comedy. But these issues in a very real way undergird the film and make it ahead of its time. Released in 1969, "Bob, Carol et al. . ." displays a jaundiced attitude about the counterculture - at least, the middle-class *embrace* of the counterculture - that wouldn't come widely into vogue until at least a decade later. Indeed, the film almost seems contemporary in its bemused and dismissive view of Sixties mores. Austin Powers fans would do well to check it out.


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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

January 1970 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$2,000,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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