5.7/10
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11 user 26 critic

Double Face (1969)

A doppia faccia (original title)
Not Rated | | Thriller | 26 July 1969 (Italy)
A business man's rich wife is killed in what he thinks is a car accident. After a period of mourning, he is lead by several unscrupulous characters to believe that his wife is actually alive.

Director:

Riccardo Freda (as Robert Hampton)

Writers:

Riccardo Freda (screenplay) (as Robert Hampton), Lucio Fulci (story) | 4 more credits »
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Photos

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Klaus Kinski ... John Alexander
Christiane Krüger ... Christine
Günther Stoll Günther Stoll ... Inspector Stevens
Annabella Incontrera ... Liz
Sydney Chaplin ... Mr. Brown
Barbara Nelli Barbara Nelli ... Alice
Margaret Lee ... Helen Brown / Helen Alexander
Gastone Pescucci Gastone Pescucci ... Peter
Claudio Trionfi Claudio Trionfi
Luciano Spadoni Luciano Spadoni ... Inspector Gordon
Ignazio Dolce ... (as Ignazio Dolci)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Alice Arno ... (hardcore inserts - French 1976 version)
Carlo Marcolino Carlo Marcolino ... Servant
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Storyline

A business man's rich wife is killed in what he thinks is a car accident. After a period of mourning, he is lead by several unscrupulous characters to believe that his wife is actually alive.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Thriller

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the title credits of the German Version, Riccardo Freda is credited as "Richard Freda", making the Director's first name sounding more German as Freda wasn't very well known in West Germany. See more »

Alternate Versions

Nudity removed for US television screenings not restored to video. Rerelease in France had new sex footage featuring Alice Arno added. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Lukas: Mann und Maus (1998) See more »

Soundtracks

Non Dirmi Una Bugia
Sung by Nora Orlandi (as Silvie St Laurent)
See more »

User Reviews

Freda Goes Wild, Kinski Plays It Cool
29 January 2003 | by dwingroveSee all my reviews

I fell in love with this movie from its first frame. Or, at any rate, the first BOOM-BANG-CRASH-WALLOP of its fabulously over-the-top piano soundtrack - as if Liberace were stationed just off camera, with blazing gold candelabra and rhinestone-studded Steinway grand. Its visuals are, if possible, lusher than its score. Crystal vases weep rose petals over the photo of a murdered woman. Venetian glass mirrors reflect the elegantly chiselled face of Klaus Kinski - glowering at us seductively over a polka-dotted silk cravat.

If you are used to Kinski hamming it up in a Herzog epic, his role here is a revelation. As a London millionaire who may or may not have murdered his lesbian wife, he is so subtle and ambiguous, so - dare I say it? - restrained that he keeps us guessing right up until the last few seconds. Seeing her 'come back to life' in a porno film (shot after her death) Kinski's face takes on a haunted look that outdoes all his raving, eye-rolling and tooth-gnashing in more famous roles.

Proof, if proof were needed, that director Riccardo Freda was not just a great unsung visual stylist, but a maestro of mood and suspense. Imagine a Chabrol or Hitchcock with the eye of a Renaissance painter, and you come close to the splendours of this film. So exquisite in its visual detail that its minor flaws - i.e. blatantly fake model car wrecks; continuity howlers such as Kinski walking bareheaded through Soho, then sitting in a nightclub with his hat on - simply evaporate before our eyes.

Oh, and I even like the tacky Italian pop ballad that keeps recurring as a 'clue' - to oddly chilling effect. So perhaps I'm just a sucker for this type of film.

David Melville


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Details

Country:

Italy | West Germany

Language:

Italian

Release Date:

26 July 1969 (Italy) See more »

Also Known As:

Puzzle of Horrors See more »

Filming Locations:

Cinecitta, Rome, Italy See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

(international)

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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