7.6/10
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If.... (1968)

R | | Drama | 21 May 1969 (France)
In this allegorical story, a revolution led by pupil Mick Travis takes place at an old established private school in England.

Director:

Lindsay Anderson

Writers:

David Sherwin (screenplay), David Sherwin (original script: "Crusaders") | 1 more credit »
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From $2.99 (SD) on Prime Video

ON DISC
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Malcolm McDowell ... Mick: Crusaders
David Wood ... Johnny: Crusaders
Richard Warwick ... Wallace: Crusaders
Christine Noonan ... The Girl: Crusaders
Rupert Webster Rupert Webster ... Bobby Philips: Crusaders
Robert Swann Robert Swann ... Rowntree: Whips
Hugh Thomas Hugh Thomas ... Denson: Whips
Michael Cadman Michael Cadman ... Fortinbras: Whips
Peter Sproule Peter Sproule ... Barnes: Whips
Peter Jeffrey ... Headmaster: Staff
Anthony Nicholls ... General Denson: Staff
Arthur Lowe ... Mr. Kemp: Staff
Mona Washbourne ... Matron: Staff
Mary MacLeod Mary MacLeod ... Mrs. Kemp: Staff (as Mary Macleod)
Geoffrey Chater ... Chaplain: Staff
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Storyline

In an indictment of the British public school system, we follow Mick and his mostly younger friends through a series of indignities and occasionally abuse as any fond feelings toward these schools are destroyed. When Mick and his friends rebel, violently, the catch phrase, "which side would you be on" becomes quite stark. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Which side will you be on? See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English | Latin

Release Date:

21 May 1969 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

If.... See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Memorial Enterprises See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Black and White | Color (Eastmancolor) (uncredited)

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Included among the "1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die", edited by Steven Schneider. See more »

Goofs

Travis steals a bike and drives to the Packhorse Cafe. As he rides in, there are no cars parked near the cafĂ©. In the next shot, when he gets off his bike, there's a car in the background that wasn't there before. See more »

Quotes

Headmaster: Education in Britain is a nubile Cinderella: sparsely clad and much interfered with.
See more »

Crazy Credits

The film's opening prologue states: Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding PROVERBS IV:7 See more »

Alternate Versions

In the UK, the BBFC requested that scenes of male and female frontal nudity be removed from the film in order to pass with an X certificate. The director removed the male frontals however, he negotiated with the BBFC and the female frontal nudity of a woman walking down a hallway was allowed. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Dirties (2013) See more »

Soundtracks

Sanctus
from the "Missa Luba" (Philips Recording)
Sung by Les Troubadours du Roi Baudouin (uncredited)
Conducted by Fr. Guido Haazen O.F.M (uncredited)
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User Reviews

 
One of the greatest of all British films
3 January 2008 | by MOscarbradleySee all my reviews

The best film ever made about school life; the rituals, the drudgery, the humiliation and ultimately the excitement. Anderson's masterpiece works on a number of levels, not least as one of the cinema's great pieces of surrealism. It's a state of the nation movie, a fantasy, an account of public school life told with an almost documentary-like precision and it's as fresh today as it was when it first appeared, (hard to believe that was almost 40 years ago or that Malcom McDowell was ever this young).

Using Jean Vigo's "Zero De Conduite" as a template, (it's not a remake), Anderson's movie is quintessentially youthful and so accurately does it depict its milieu as to appear almost arrogant. He handles revolution with a grandstanding authority and homosexual, (and heterosexual), schoolboy yearning more romantically than any other film I can think of, (Wallace's display in the gymnasium as blonde, beautiful, tousle-haired Bobby Phillips looks on is blissfully homo-erotic), and he does this with a masterly control of the medium. (His comments about financial restraints dictating the fluctuations between black-and-white and colour photography may well be true but the choices seem inspired, nevertheless and the great Miroslav Ondricek's camera-work is superb).

He was also a great actor's director, often working with many of the same actors both in theatre and in cinema and he extracts marvellous performances from the likes of Arthur Lowe, Peter Jeffrey, Mona Washborne and Geoffrey Chater representing the Establishment as well as pitch-perfect performances from David Wood, Richard Warwick, Rupert Webster, Robert Swann and Hugh Thomas, all new to cinema, as the students.

The film made Malcom McDowell a star and for a few short years, (here, in "O Lucky Man", as Alex in "A Clockwork Orange"), that star burned brightly before he sold out to Hollywood and his career began to flounder in a series of mediocre American movies, reaching a nadir with "Caligula". But his performance as Mick Travis is a marvel and both it and the film that first encapsulated it remain among the finest achievements in British cinema.


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