Yellow Submarine (1968) Poster

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7/10
imaginative psychedelic imagery and great Beatles songs
SnoopyStyle6 January 2015
The otherworldly Pepperland has been taken over by the ruthless music hating Blue Meanies. The people are immobilized and the colors drained. Old Fred escapes on the Yellow Submarine and recruits the members of The Beatles to bring back the music. They meet a strange creature named Jeremy Hillary Boob Ph.D. They arrive in Pepperland and revive the mayor. The guys go off to battle the Blue Meanies and their minions with music.

This is most noted for its psychedelic colors and imagery. The story is pretty basic with some great Beatles tones. It has the Blue Meanies and all the rest. The first hour is a meandering adventure in various crazy locations. The guys finally meet the Blue Meanies in the last half hour. It has some of the most imaginative vibrant visuals.
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9/10
Truly Original
Hitchcoc10 December 2016
This could have been poorly done had it not been for a sense of quality that seemed to be a part of the Beatles and their people. This is the wonderful story of society that develops over time and come under threat. But it is not the usual "save the world" kind of thing but rather the creation of a world like we've never seen. There is a surreal being to it. It is colorful and engaging. Of course, what is most impressive is the integration of Beatles music into the plot. "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" is a great example of psychedelic visuals. But overall, it is a movie that never bores. Its images are striking and there is an array of the most wonderful characters.
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3/10
Better off Listening the CD
claudio_carvalho14 November 2004
In Pepperland, the evil Blue Meanies are attacking the music lovers and The Beatles are invited by Captain Fred to go to Pepperland in a Yellow Submarine to fight against the evil forces. Last week I found 'Yellow Submarine' on DVD on sale and I decided to buy this cult-movie. I had never seen this movie before, and it is hard to express how disappointed I am. When 'Yellow Submarine' was released, I was too young and I was not a fan of 'The Beatles'. Watching 'Yellow Submarine' for the first time when you are an adult, is too much boring and dated. I believe that only persons who saw this film in 1968 or fans of The Beatles may like this psychedelic animation. Better off listening the CD. My vote is three.

Title (Brazil): 'Yellow Submarine'
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Imaginative - great music with good (but dated) animation
bob the moo10 May 2003
When the musical Pepperland is attacked and conquered by the music-hating Blue Meanies, only Captain Fred escapes with the aid of his yellow submarine. Fred travels through time to earth to find Ringo out for a walk. He follows Ringo back home and begs him for help. Ringo agrees and rounds up the rest of the Beatles to return to Pepperland and challenge the Blue Meanies with joy and music.

It has been many years since I have seen this film so I decided to revisit it. The first obstacle I had to get over was my dislike for 60's psychedelic animation – of which much of this film is made up of or aspires to. I feel that it has dated very badly and that it is difficult to watch unless you accept that it is very much of it's time. Once over that obstacle then there is much to enjoy. The plot is crazy but (as with the animation) shows such great imaginations at work behind it. There is much to enjoy visually – even if it has become a psychedelic cliché of the sixties.

The humour is very dry and matches the Beatles' wit in Hard Day's Night. Although the Beatles themselves do not provide the spoken voices for their characters (until the end) their onscreen characters are still well done and convincing. The music is the main pull I suspect and it has several Beatles hits that everyone will love. Not being a major fan of theirs, there were songs that I didn't know – but I still enjoyed these.

The film's weakness is that it is very thin on substance as the focus was imagination. As a result it does drag at times. When the music is on then it is fine, when the Beatles are bantering then it is fine, however, at other times the stretches begin to show and the material isn't good enough to hold the attention. Other than this flaw I did enjoy it despite not really liking all this hippy trippy stuff that is of the 60's and nothing more.

Overall an enjoyable bit of animation. Those who dislike the Beatles or dislike 60's animation will probably do best to avoid this but if that's your thing then there is plenty to enjoy here in this imaginative and witty film.
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10/10
I would like to live in a yellow submarine
lee_eisenberg16 June 2005
I guess that everybody knows the story: after the music-hating Blue Meanies demolish Pepperland, Old Fred flees in a yellow submarine to find help, and he finds the Beatles. On their way back, they experience a psychedelic world of monsters, holes, a Nowhere Man, even a fish with arms. When it finally comes time to battle the Blue Meanies, the Beatles dress up like Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band.

The best part is of course the music. The title song, plus "Eleanor Rigby", "All Together Now", "When I'm Sixty-Four", "Only a Northern Song", "Nowhere Man", "Lucy and the Sky with Diamonds", "Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", "All You Need Is Love", "Hey Bulldog" and "It's All Too Much" keep the movie going every step of the way. And the animation is magnificent. "Yellow Submarine" is a veritable classic. This is what the '60s were all about.
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7/10
Yellow Submarine
jboothmillard23 May 2007
Warning: Spoilers
I first saw The Beatles in the acclaimed A Hard Day's Night, and this was the third film together, and quite an interesting one. This is animated film is basically about Pepperland, named after Sergeant Pepper of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (The Beatles), is attacked by the music-hating Blue Meanies. So the Lord Mayor (Lance Percival) sends Young/Old Fred (Percival again) in a yellow submarine to get the band. John (John Clive), Paul (Geoffrey Hughes), Ringo (Paul Angelis) and George (Peter Batten) are now on a weird, wonderful, colourful, zany and over the top Alice in Wonderland type journey from Liverpool to Pepperland. In the end, the Blue Meanies make peace, and they all live happily ever after. Also starring the voices of Dick Emery. The Beatles (John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr and George Harrison) may not be voicing themselves, an I thought they were (the actors are very convincing), but they do sing all the sings in the film. A really wacky animated film, probably influenced by light drug use, songs include: "Yellow Submarine", "All Together Now", "All You Need Is Love", "Eleanor Rigby", "Hey Bulldog", "It's All Too Much", "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", "March of the Blue Meanies", "Nowhere Man", "Pepperland", "Pepperland Laid Waste", "Sea of Holes", "Sea of Monsters", "Sea of Time", "Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band", "When I'm Sixty-Four" and "Yellow Submarine in Pepperland". The Beatles were number 4 on The 100 Greatest Pop Culture Icons. Very good!
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8/10
Still Innovative, Unbelievably Colorful
ccthemovieman-115 November 2005
Over 35 years later, this is still an innovative animated film: colorful, clever and different. In fact, you'd have to look hard to find a more colorful film ever made.

The Beatles characters are fun, spouting a number of good puns and inside jokes concerning lyrics from some of their past songs. The bad guys here, the "Blue Meanies," are also fun to watch and really different from anything you've seen.

This is wild stuff which can appeal to adults even more than kids. The only improvement I would have made would have been to shorten it a bit. Even at a fairly short 90 minutes, some could have been trimmed.

The DVD is fine, except for the last 30 minutes when it gets grainy. However, the 5.1 surround sound more than makes up for that, affording the viewer to hear all these famous Beatles songs in a better format that surrounds you as a CD could never do.
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10/10
Yellow Submarine in Wonderland...
dbdumonteil19 May 2006
Although they do not appear -unless the three final minutes count-,this is my Beatles favorite film by far.Dunning 's dazzling work revolutionized the cartoons as Walt Disney did thirty years before with "SnowWhite" .I love everything happening in it:the musical world of the most influential group of all time -it will infuriate the Velvet Underground's fans but sorry ,the Beatles are second to none when it comes to influence the whole world- on the screen .I do not care if "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" was written for Julian Lennon's school friend,in the movie ,it is psychedelic fireworks.The Blue Meanies might be a nod to the Mouse House as they look like big Mickeys .The humor ,the puns and a sense of absurd ,of nonsense are true delight.It has often been mooted that the original songs were undistinguished:but "hey bulldog" is vintage Lennon and the two Harrisongs have madness going for them.Paul' s "all together now' is a good campfire song,it 's sometimes useful.George Martin's soundtrack -which was on side two of the original album and was replaced by songs included in the films (but which had already appeared on the Beatles albums )- was made with taste and respect for the audience.

The yellow Submarine is dying to take you away!A splendid time is guaranteed for all!
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10/10
A very good movie for two different audiences, and somewhat entertaining for the rest
Quinoa198412 January 2004
Yellow Submarine, directed by George Dunning (with the animation directed by Tom Halley and Heinz Edelmann), can be seen thirty-five years later as a film, for the most part, for two audiences: children, especially the little ones learning about life through cartoons and movies, will probably be pulled into the story of the blue meanies who destroy Pepperland, and how Captain Fred is sent out to bring the fab four to fight back and restore the land, while taking in the sights on the adventure.

That the movie has lush, striking colors and visuals, a range of originality (if I had seen it when I was a kid I could compare the experience to that of seeing Toy Story when it was first released), and includes musical interludes with some of the finest songs the Beatles produced in that period, the movie works very well for the parents as well as the kids. Such songs include the title song, "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds", "When I'm Sixty-Four", and "Nowhere Man", which are great numbers, and "Eleanor Rigby" taking the cake.

But that brings me to the other audience, the one that remembers seeing the film for the first time in its initial release- perhaps under the influence of certain substances- and those in this generation who discover it for the first time and are NOT children. Since Yellow Submarine is as much a musical/fantasy vehicle for the Beatles as it is a trippy, abstract art-film (in the later category it's a gem), it could be frustrating to those in the audience who find the animation TOO experimental and, shall I say, 60-ish. And those who love the animation may not like the Beatles.

Overall, Yellow Submarine is a success, for the young hippie at heart or the old one wanting to re-live the experience of 1968, and children may be delighted (or turned off, depends on how much they've been affected by more recent animated pieces).
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10/10
The Unforgettable Beatles Animation Feature
sunwarrior137 September 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Yellow Submarine is an animated musical fantasy film based on the music of The Beatles.The film was directed by animation producer George Dunning, and produced by United Artists and King Features Syndicate. Initial reports said that the Beatles themselves would provide their own character voices,however, aside from composing and performing the songs, the real Beatles participated only in the closing scene of the film, while their cartoon counterparts were voiced by other actors.

The Blue Meanies take over Pepperland, draining it of all its color and music, firing anti-music missiles, bonking people with green apples, and turning the inhabitants to stone by way of the pointed finger of a giant white glove. As the only survivor, the Lord Admiral escapes in the yellow submarine and goes to London to enlist the help of the Beatles. The charming and innocent boys travel through strange worlds and meet bizarre characters, including the Nowhere Man. Several blissed-filled musical sequences and drug references later, the Beatles drive out the Blue Meanies and restore Pepperland to tranquility armed with only music, love, and witty remarks.

The movie is an animated meandering journey filled with puns and dry British humor, where psychedelic music videos take precedent over any linear story. What little there is of a plot, however, concerns a vibrantly colored place called Pepperland that resembles the album cover for Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club Band come to life. The swirling animation is a mixture of pop-culture images and modern artistic styles brought loosely together with a naïve antiwar message and some clever political commentary.

Also,the animated feature could be considered a family movie as it will definitely provide fun and entertainment to viewers of all ages.Also,it is characterized by a joyful blend of colorful animation and the music of the Beatles will delight anyone regardless of age.

OFF TOPIC:This film is was on limited released this year (May 2012).
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10/10
Timeless animated classic; you can't beat The Beatles
george.schmidt3 June 2008
Warning: Spoilers
The Beatles' music - and their likenesses - are incorporated into this kaleidoscopic, trippy, fun and altogether marvelous animated classic where The Fab Four are transported into PepperLand on an adventure to restore the citizens to life and having many adventures along their merry way. Truly inspired with timeless music and memorable characters - Jeremy, the fuzzy-wuzzy "nowhere man" and the Mickey Mouse-like Blue Meanies are a few to mention. Fun for the entire family and truly magical in transporting you into a cinematic Never-Never- Land! One of my all time favorite films; dare you not to sing to the titular tune! A true capsule for the hazy, crazy '60s!
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8/10
The Blue Meanies vs Fab Four
ferguson-67 July 2018
Greetings again from the darkness. "It was 50 years ago, Sgt Pepper taught the band to play". OK, I know that's not the lyric, but 50 fits better than 20 when we are talking about the latest re-mastered 4K version of the classic animated YELLOW SUBMARINE from The Beatles. Originally released in 1968, the story is by Lee Minoff and is based on the Lennon-McCartney song of the title. Additional dialogue and story elements were contributed by (at least) four other writers, including Erich Segal of LOVE STORY fame, and after all these years, the film not only remains quite entertaining, it has attained a certain legendary status.

Directed by George Dunning (animation producer), also instrumental in The Beatles "unaffiliated" animated TV series of the same era, the film requires a bit of historical perspective to bring the full picture into focus. This was the year before Woodstock, and the Beatles were no longer the four fresh faced lads from Liverpool. Their songs had not only changed the music world, it had changed them as individuals. Much of their charm had turned to cynicism, and drug use was prevalent. The band reluctantly agreed to allow production of this animated movie for the sole purpose of fulfilling their 3 film contract with United Artist (A HARD DAY'S NIGHT, HELP!). Other than the songs and a closing segment, they were barely involved ... not even voicing their own characters.

The true legacy is what we see on screen, and after 50 years, it remains magical. The psychedelic pop art visuals were unlike anything most of us had ever seen. The colors and images seemed to explode in vibrancy and come alive before our eyes. Some have mistakenly credited pop artist Peter Max as the man behind the colorful images, and fans of Monty Python (especially Terry Gilliam) will easily recognize the stylistic influence. Sharp ears will pick up references to Beatles lyrics not included on the soundtrack, and much of the dialogue captures the droll tone of Lennon or the whimsy of McCartney. However, we never stop thinking about how much more effective this could have been with John, Paul, George and Ringo providing the voices.

An extended opening sequence provides the basics of the story - The Blue Meanies are coming (!) and they intend to expunge all music and color from Pepperland. The only way to stop them is with Beatles music. Once we 'understand' the story, we hear Ringo's vocals kick off the title song over the opening credits. Through the adventure we meet some fascinating and creative characters, see an abundance of green apples (the logo for Apple Records), play spot the icon (with actual photographs), laugh along with Ringo and his "hole" in the pocket, and catch the essence of Beatles wit, though the dialogue is sometimes a bit muddled.

Of course, beyond the animation, it's the music that matters. Two songs that stand out because of the corresponding animation are "Eleanor Rigby" and "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds". Some of the 11 Beatles songs mish-mashed from various albums include: "Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band", "All You Need is Love", "All Together Now", and "When I'm Sixty-Four". There are also a couple of George Harrison songs that aren't otherwise available, and a personal favorite, "Hey Bulldog", which has its own sequence, and was originally only included in the UK movie version. We also notice the beautiful orchestra music composed by long-time Beatles producer George Martin.

At the time it was released, hippies would claim the movie looks better when you're stoned, and it's likely for those folks, that sentiment held true for most things in life. The message of the day and one present in much of the Beatles' work, is that of Love. It's a message that rings true today, and also part of why the film works so well for both kids and adults. Although we may be a bit disappointed that the fab four don't provide the voices of their characters, the stunning visuals and classic songs make this a film for everyone. The short live action sequence at the end where we see the real John, Paul, George and Ringo is simply the cherry on top ... or is that an Apple?
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10/10
It's a Blue World.
anaconda-406585 August 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Yellow Submarine (1968): Dir: George Dunning / Voices: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, Dick Emery: Outstanding and brilliant animated musical masterpiece that seems to symbolize bizarre forms of joy and peace within one's mind. Peaceful Pepperland has been invaded by the ruthless Blue Meanies who are out to turn everything blue. Help is on the way as the Beatles sail through aboard a yellow submarine amidst several striking musical numbers, some pointless while others interlock themes that all deal with feel and emotion. Pepperland is made up of various images that don't make any sense yet somehow add to its mind reference. The Beatles are perhaps the most famous band in music history. They are John Lennon, Paul McCartney, Ringo Starr, and George Harrison, all of whom are heard singing in animated form although voice talents are provided by other actors who give fine imitations of the foursome. Besides the Beatles there are other strange looking characters including the Blue Meanies and the Nowhere Man who has no sense of direction. Excellent directing by George Dunning as a great tribute to the mannerisms of the Beatles as well as present very colourful animated scenery and a world created out of the bizarre. This film is a striking greatness about the feelings of joy, love and a celebration of music and animation. Score: 10 / 10
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8/10
Fun and enjoyable film with some good one liners from Max of the Blue Meanies
llltdesq17 February 2015
Warning: Spoilers
This is an animated film built around songs by the Beatles. There will be mild spoilers ahead:

The plot here is really kind of basic. In a far off land called Pepperland, the Blue Meanies have attacked because they hate music and happiness. They imprison Sgt. Pepper and his Lonely Hearts Club Band in a globe and subjugate the people to their rule. One man, Old Fred, flees in the Yellow Submarine to find help (as the Lord Mayor says, "H is for Hurry, E is for Ergent, L is for Love me and P is for Please!").

Fred takes the sub to Liverpool and more Beatles music, "Eleanor Rigby" next, coming upon Ringo walking alone and feeling unappreciated. Fred jabbers incoherently, but Ringo agrees to help and off we go to get the other three, each making an entrance amidst rater whimsical surroundings (lots of strangeness in the house they're in, with things playing with toys and odd things going on behind doors).

Paul is last to arrive, completely up to speed on things and referring to Blue Meanies as though he knows what they are. The Beatles join Fred in the sub and proceed though various Seas which serve as musical cues as well as introducing the character of Jeremy Hillary Boob, a rather endearing if bombastic little man.

En route to Pepperland, we meet monsters, Indians, the cavalry, a Sea of Holes (where Ringo winds up with "a hole in me pocket" literally. Jeremy is kidnapped by the Blue Meanies in the Sea of Holes, which gives way to the Sea of Green and Pepperland.

Pepperland has lost all color and is now a sad, drab and gray place. The Beatles manage to make it to where the other band is imprisoned and Ringo uses the "hole" from his pocket to free them from the globe. Some of the best stuff happens in here, like a conversation between the head Blue Meanie and his toady Max. Max has some great lines here, mostly replies to questions. Jeremy, of all people, neutralizes the head Blue Meanie and the day is saved.

There's a short live action bit with the real Beatles cutting up for the camera and ending the film by singing "All Together Now". It's a very fun, if somewhat lightweight film.

This is available on DVD and Blu Ray and looks great. It's well worth getting. Recommended.
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9/10
Brilliant animation built on brilliant music. A classic.
cherold29 August 2019
After learning that my girlfriend had only see Yellow Submarine while stoned, and seemed convinced that was the reason she liked it, I insisted she watch it unstoned. She still liked it, and it was every bit as good as I recalled.

The story makes no sense, as the movie struggles to turn a bunch of random songs into some sort of narrative, but that hardly matters. The pun-filled script is blithely entertaining, the scenarios are wonderfully imaginative, the songs are terrific (of course), and the visuals are beyond amazing. The animation has a lose, experimental feel that was extraordinary at the time and is even more so in the days of digital animation.

Surprisingly, the weakest aspects of the movies are the Beatles' contributions, which consists of four of their lesser songs (although I do really like Only a Northern Song even though my girlfriend points out it's quite similar to Harrison's previous If I Needed Someone). None of the new songs really helped with creating the story and thus feel a little shoehorned in.

The first time I saw this movie I was 10 years old and I loved it. Now I'm 58 and I still love it. It is a gloriously colorful display of 60s pop art that should be seen by anyone who loves animation, the Beatles, or weird psychedelic art.
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6/10
We All Live In A Yellow Submarine!
StrictlyConfidential24 March 2020
I have recently encountered several people who really don't have anything at all good to say about 1968's "Yellow Submarine"..... And - Hey! - That's OK!!

But, on the contrary - I quite enjoyed this psychedelically animated musical-comedy-adventure story featuring the memorable music and the cartoon likenesses of the Fab Four (aka. The Beatles).

Hey! - So - There you go!
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9/10
Psychedelic Nonsense
Cineanalyst21 August 2020
The Beatles were such a dynamic pop-culture phenomenon that I suppose it was inevitable that they would leave their mark on film, too, but it's nonetheless remarkable how influential those pictures have been, particularly "A Hard Day's Night" (1964) and this, "Yellow Submarine," and despite the fab four not necessarily having much to do with the significance of them. They especially had little to do with this one, with it being animated, reportedly, a way for them to satisfy their contract with United Artists without doing any work outside of the final live-action scene. Yet, lending their image and songs inspired others to create the landmark visuals here--demonstrating newfound potential for animation and influencing the development of psychedelic art, with its influence seen in the work of, among others, Terry Gilliam. Comparing Gilliam's cut-out animations for Monty Python to the "Eleanor Rigby" sequence here, in particular, demonstrates the obviousness of this debt. Rather than focus on the singular appeal of "Yellow Submarine," however, I'm going to comment a bit on the reason I revisited it, which is because I've been tracking a bunch of varied cinematic transmutations of Lewis Carroll's Alice books since reading them.

No mere nonsense, the Alice books have had a long afterlife in the history of animation, surrealism and, it would seem, in psychedelic art and the music of the Beatles. Quite a bit of attention, wasted it seems to me, has been spent on the supposed psychedelic properties of Disney's 1951 "Alice in Wonderland." That case, however, seems to rest largely on the picture being colorful; otherwise, it's too didactic and logical in being contrariwise to Carroll's moral-less nonsense. Not only is the limited animation in "Yellow Submarine" even more colorful, but it's also far less concerned with plot and characterizations and more consistent with the illogic of dreams and the sort of playful punnery and absurd detours, doppelgängers and juxtapositions befitting Carrollian inspiration and The Beatles music. Indeed, much of the band's songs have an "Alice in Wonderland" quality to them--"Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" especially (even more explicitly inspired by the Alice books, "I Am the Walrus" didn't make the cut, though), with lyrics involving a boat on a river (akin to where Charles Dodgson originally told his stories to the Liddell girls, as well as the Humpty Dumpty episode from the second book), towering flowers and colorful nonsense.

What there is of a story, unimportant as it is, involves another world, like Wonderland or Looking-Glass World, which is invaded by music-hating Blue Meanies. As a little-seen YouTube video by the channel Kiss The Tulips points out, the Beatles, then, like Alice, are led by a white-haired man--in the stead of the White Rabbit--down the hatch of the yellow submarine. As they get closer to Pepperland (pepper recalling the "Pig and Pepper" chapter from the first book), there's an actual figure of a white rabbit. There's also the sequence involving doors, which expanding on Alice's growing pains, includes films-within-films with references to "Frankenstein," "King Kong" (1933) and the Lumière brothers' "Arrival of a Train" (1896). Moreover, Time is a person here, as in Wonderland, and there is an extended sequence of clocks and time-travel motifs. Pepperland and its surrounding environs, too, are occupied by curiouser and curiouser transmogrifying and loony creatures and sights--some of which adopt a form recalling specific characters from the books, if only momentarily, such as the Nowhere Man whose ears perk up like rabbit ears as he checks his pocket watch. And even the film's tagline professing, "It's all in the mind, y'know," recalls the dream framing of the Alice books.

Central to all these scattered allusions to Carroll's books combined with the Beatles music in a colorful adventure, of course, is supposedly LSD and the rest of a drug culture--pointing back to Alice consuming mushrooms and other substances to grow bigger and smaller in her adventures and forwards to a potion transforming Frankenstein's monster into John Lennon here. And, while indeed "Lucy in the Sky of Diamonds" is an initialism for LSD, the real inspiration for the song, as Lennon claimed, was his child's drawing. A piece of art inspired by and for kids alike as with Dodgson and Alice Liddell. Of course, an understanding of drugs are fundamental to the psychedelic art, as, say, Oxford was to the Alice books, but it goes beyond that. Less intriguing films, after all, were made of Alice and psychedelic references around the same time as "Yellow Submarine." A self-defeating anti-drug PSA was made from cut-out animation for "Curious Alice" (1968), a ploy mocked for the exploitation of "Alice in Acidland" (1969), and pills and other such consumables have been integral to mind-altering experiences in other such Carrollian pictures, such as "Where the Truth Lies" (2005) and "The Matrix" (1999), but the influence of the animation style along with "Alice in Wonderland" reaches further, from Gilliam to even the corporate art of "Superflat Monogram" (2003). More importantly, "Yellow Submarine" is a clever, lovely and playful picture in the acknowledged vein of "Alice in Wonderland."
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8/10
Another Beatles revolution in modern music - the video clip
The-Sarkologist14 October 2011
Warning: Spoilers
I was a little upset with my friend's comment regarding this movie. He said that he had the unfortunate pleasure of seeing this movie and that if one wants to see a bizarre movie then one should watch the art house film that was really weird, but at least he had a point. Coming from a guy that watches wrestling because it is brainless entertainment, I don't put much credence on his opinions. If he were to be more consistent in his comments, and maybe even learn to appreciate some of the finer points in movies then it would be much better and I would probably take his opinions more seriously.

Anyway, this movie is about a guy, Old Fred, who flees Pepper Land when it is attacked by the Blue Meanies. He flees in a Yellow Submarine and enlists the Beatles to help him free Pepperland. They then go on a bizarre journey back to Pepperland where they pick up a Nowhere Man because he looks lonely and defeat the Meanies by playing music.

This is one weird animated feature, and for those who have seen Monty Python's flying circus, you will probably recognise the animation style. It is distinct and very rarely seen anywhere else. The movie is also serenaded by numerous songs of the Beatles, most likely off of their Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band album, which I might end up getting one of these days. It actually reminds me of this guy that the only record he would play was Sergeant Peppers, and in the end everybody got really sick of it.

The animation isn't all that consistent, as it takes a much different look during the song Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, being a more artistic, yet not so definite, though the humans in this song seem to look more realistic and less animated.

The interesting thing in the end is that they do not kill anybody. There is a bit of violence, as conflict defines literature, but the Big Blue Meanie in the end is forgiven and allowed to join in with the people of Pepperland. In the end their message is clearly "make love, not war," and by showing a bit of love to everybody, then everything is solved. Great in theory, but in reality, in a world where everybody is out for themselves, impossible.

Favourite Line: Excuse me, would you believe me if I told you I was being followed by a Yellow Submarine? I thought not.
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6/10
Imaginative and fascinating
briancham199431 May 2020
This is one of the closest things to seeing a dream on screen. There is so much visual imagination and wacky scenarios. You never really know where things will go. The story itself is simple but I guess that's not the point. It was enjoyable even for a non-Beatles fan but it was clearly made just for them.
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10/10
A great classic animated film
Rectangular_businessman8 October 2011
Warning: Spoilers
"The Yellow Submarine" is truly a unique experience. Perhaps as a film "in the traditional sense" this is not a masterpiece, but as testament to the ideals of the time is priceless.

More than just a movie, "Yellow Submarine" must be seen as a journey through the psychedelic years of the late sixties. The surreal aesthetic from this film is enough to make this movie have an everlasting place in the history of animation. As such, the viewer can just be carried away by the excellent songs and the imaginative musical numbers, with lots of humorous sequences, and few doses of metaphysics and spirituality proper to the time in which this movie was made. Such ideas could be curious for modern viewers, like for example, the idea that we all have a double somewhere in the world, or the existence of a perfect country, where all is happiness and music.

All the characters from this movie were very good and interesting, such as Jeremy Hilary Boobor the leader of the Blue Meanies...The creativity from this film was clearly ahead of its time, and even when the modern viewers could consider the quality of the animation dated, the incredible imagination displayed by this film stands, even for modern standards, where there is a lot of weird animations, but none of them had the charm and beauty of the "Yellow Submarine".
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3/10
Dated
arfdawg-119 August 2020
This movie is exceedingly dated. The music is great but the plot is non existent an the exposition leaves much to want.

It probably was cool to watch back in the day, but boy, not any more.

Nobody fawns over teh Beatles anymore. Their music is wonderful, but the boys are long over.
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8/10
What a pleasant and stunning visual experience!
Polaris_DiB2 October 2007
Warning: Spoilers
The Beatles Yellow Submarine is one of those perfect movies for everyone. The humor and music is pretty Universal, so children can get into it, but the context of the animation and what we all know about the Beatles can make the whole affair very fascinating to adult sentiments. However, mostly, it's just a finally realized animated experience, with some good humor and a good rote storyline to be quite entertaining.

The evil Blue Meanies come to take all the music and joy out of Pepperland, the happy-go-lucky paradise where music and love allows the populace to live in peace. Using freezing weapons and giant apples (think what that means with the Beatles' record label...) they quickly subjugate the entire populace save one man who manages to escape in a yellow submarine to go get help. After an extremely amazing animated sequence involving the song "Eleanor Rigby" and a surreal adventure in a labyrinthine mansion, he finds help in the form of our favorite quartet, John, Paul, George, and Ringo, who look suspiciously like the Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Heart Band that originally led Pepperland to paradise. The four heroes travel through alternating Universes that are basically long plays on logic and reason (and very funny and interesting at that), and then work together to bring love and joy back to Pepperland, using Beatles songs throughout.

In a world of post-60s psychedelic revelation, this animation is still closer to The Phantom Tollbooth than Alice in Wonderland, or worse, Pink Floyd's The Wall. Most of it is just wordplay and puns, with a few messages about keeping an open mind and accepting one another thrown in. It's a great concept, and superbly realized especially with the various approaches to animation throughout (though the "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" bit gets almost as bizarre as interpretations of the song itself).

--PolarisDiB
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4/10
"Yellow Submarine" Surfaces As A Psychedelic "Pop-Art" Lemon
strong-122-47888524 May 2014
Intentionally marketed as a "head movie" (at the very height of the flower-power craze of the mid-1960s), Yellow Submarine is an animated offering, with songs, that probably comes across a helluva lot better if you're stoned.

But, if you don't indulge in such mind-numbing, I mean, mind-altering activities as this, then you'll surely find yourself (like I did) at a disadvantage, feeling somewhat short-changed by this decidedly disappointing and over-hyped "Beatles" movie.

Featuring some really terrible humor, a boring story-line, and flat, uninspired pop-art animation, I view Yellow Submarine as being something of a "message" movie.

Even though this film's "message" is somewhat vague, one can clearly tell that Yellow Submarine was a movie intended to make The Beatles more money (which it did) by trying to deceive the viewer into believing that The Fab 4 actually cared about more than just money (which they probably didn't).

This is one of those movies that just hasn't aged very well in the 46 years since its 1968 release. To me, Yellow Submarine's story seems to be geared more to naive children, rather than to intelligent, thinking adults.

One of this film's biggest downfalls was that a good number of The Beatles' songs that riddled the story (such as Eleanor Rigby, Nowhere Man, & When I'm 64) just didn't fit very well into its plot-line which focused on a crisis in Pepperland that was provoked by an all-out attack from the Blue Meanies.
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9/10
A transporting experience
ebiros220 October 2005
If there ever was a movie that was transporting experience, I think this was it. Right from the get go, you know that it's not your ordinary animated movie. The style of the Beatles is well captured in this movie. You need to remember that this was made in the '60s, the psychedelic era, and the art and color are all that in this movie. The movie tried to be far out as possible artistically ( Maybe trying to out do Peter Max. Do you remember him ?) and audiences expected that because the movie was about the Beatles.

I recommend people to watch this movie because it's a reminder how ordinary our culture have become over the past 40 years. We've actually regressed (yes, regressed) culture wise, and made ourselves less willing to experiment. There was a time when culture tried to be more open minded and less petty (there were casualties along the way like any frontier), and not put so much emphasis on our self importance. As such a reminder, this movie stands out in its importance.
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