Tell Me Lies (1968) Poster

(1968)

User Reviews

Review this title
2 Reviews
Sort by:
Filter by Rating:
8/10
This is a fine film.
heathblair2 July 2000
This is a fine film. A drama-documentary, which takes a telling if narrow snapshot of London at the height of the Vietnam war. This is fascinating and useful insight into one section of British thinking. Coming as it does from the perspective of noted theatre director Peter Brooke and his band of Royal Shakespeare Company players, the views expressed here are authentically vexed, complex and multi-layered.

Many scenarios are authored and staged by Brooke and the cast which illustrate the diversity of anti-war opinion that existed among London's artistic and intellectual communities. However, this is no Swinging London post-card fantasy. The opinions expressed here are raw, heartfelt and honestly confused - much like the war itself.

One is left with the impression that those who occupied London's and indeed Britain's cultural high ground were feeling a sense of moral impotence and torment in the face of war's terrible realities. At the end of 'Tell Me Lies', the question of what price should be paid to fight a 'moral' conflict is left unanswered. Instead, we are left with a reminder that art and politics can offer no easy solutions to the legacy of war with its landscapes of broken bodies and destroyed lives.
6 out of 7 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
10/10
Thrilling, powerful, disturbing
cuyocksol-UK6 February 2010
The best film about war I've seen. This is not a film about 'a war' like the countless others I've seen, but something that truly addresses the issue of war itself. What is war? Is it a necessary part of human nature? Can one be a pacifist? Do I really care that people are being killed (in my name) in far-away lands?

Needless to say this film is as vibrant and shockingly relevant to the year 2010 as it was to 1968. Vietnam? Iraq? Afghanistan......?

Peter merges his 'fiction' seamlessly with stock footage, real people speaking, 'dramatic reconstructions'... even musical numbers. Again and again during the film I as the viewer am placed in front of myself. If you are open to the experience, you cannot watch this film passively. Peter has created a film which places myself and my 'opinions' in question.

I saw this film for the 1st time recently despite being a long-time admirer of Brook's work. It was screened at the Barbican in London. In order to reach the wide audience it richly deserves, this film should be re-released on DVD.
3 out of 3 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews