6.6/10
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21 user 19 critic

Horus: Prince of the Sun (1968)

Taiyô no ôji: Horusu no daibôken (original title)
Not Rated | | Animation, Action, Adventure | 21 July 1968 (Japan)
A boy with a mythical sword wants to protect a Norse village from an evil ice wizard and his minions, who destroyed his family's village. However, the villagers don't fully trust him and a mysterious girl with a dark secret befriends him.

Director:

Isao Takahata

Writer:

Kazuo Fukazawa (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mikijirô Hira ... Grunwald, the Demon of Ice (voice)
Etsuko Ichihara Etsuko Ichihara ... Hilda (voice)
Eijirô Tôno ... Ganko, the blacksmith (voice)
Masao Mishima ... Village Leader (voice)
Yasushi Nagata Yasushi Nagata ... Drago, villager
Hisako Ôkata Hisako Ôkata ... Hols (voice)
Hiroshi Kamiyama Hiroshi Kamiyama ... Villager (voice)
Hisashi Yokomori Hisashi Yokomori ... Horu's Father / Toto, the white owl (voice)
Tokuko Sugiyama Tokuko Sugiyama
Tadashi Yokouchi Tadashi Yokouchi ... Paul / Moog the Rock Giant (voice)
Asako Akazawa Asako Akazawa ... Piria, Rusan's fiancée
Yuriko Abe Yuriko Abe ... Young woman
Kazuo Tachibana Kazuo Tachibana ... Villager
Taisaku Akino ... Rusan (as Masaaki Tsusaka)
Yoshie Hinoki Yoshie Hinoki
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Storyline

Horus, a kid living in an unnamed Scandinavian/Eastern Europe culture of the Iron Age, recovers the Sword of the Sun from the rock giant Moog and learns from his dying father that he must returns to his ancestral territory. In the process, he defends a village from the attacks of Grundewald, a warlord/ice demon and befriends the enigmatic Hilda, a lonely and beautiful girl who sings haunting songs (and who hides a terrible secret). Written by Korman643

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

girl | sword | boy | giant | demon | See All (14) »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The script was based on a puppet theater drama written by scriptwriter Kazuo Fukazawa, itself based on an ancient legend of the Ainu, the aboriginal people living in Northern Japan. The Scandinavian/Viking/Eastern Europe setting was an idea of the producers, worried that a movie too identified with a local culture wouldn't have had enough international appeal. See more »

Goofs

When Grunwald is holding Hols' rope on the icy cliff, you can see his gloves change color from black to blue to black again. See more »

Quotes

Hols: [after escaping from the Endless Woods and encountering Hilda] Hilda, come with me to the village.
[She steps back, clutches her amulet and glares coldly at him]
Hols: I was right, I knew we could get the other Hilda out of you. Come to the village, Hilda.
[Shaking her head, she attacks him with her sword and he fends her off with his axe]
Hols: That's the Hilda we must get out of you. Be brave and show them how human you really are.
[He disarms her and she bows her head]
Hols: There... you are human
Hilda: [Gazes sadly at him]
[...]
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Alternate Versions

The English-dubbed version from AIP-TV changed the location of the film from Northern Japan to Norway. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hana and Alice (2004) See more »

User Reviews

The first Isao Takahata film
2 January 2006 | by emasterslakeSee all my reviews

Before My Neighbors the Yamadas, before Pom Poko, before Only Yesterday, and before Grave of the Fireflies. There was Little Prince Horus(USA Title). This was the first Movie Isao Takahata directed.

He and legendary Anime maker Hayao Miyazaki and some other animators who were still in their early years in animation industries made this film possible.

It's nothing like Isao Takahata's other works. This one is about an Alternate Viking/Scandinavian Time Period about a boy named Horus who receives a sword from some Earth God, and is sent on a quest to defeat an Ice Demon(who's pretty cool looking) meets a group of village locals and a mysterious Girl who has the key to restoring peace to the land.

It took 3 years for this film to be made. Animation is well done even if this was made 38 years ago. Back when Anime was still primitive. It's interesting to watch. Too bad it didn't do well when it was in Japanese Theatures. But what's cool about it is it became known as the earliest forms of modern anime.

In other words it's anime that doesn't have to be made for kids to watch.

I'm not sure when it'll get licensed to get it's own English Debut. But worth seeing for those who are interested in Animes that broke the rules. I'd recommend this film for Ages 12 and up contains cartoon violence and a split second of nudity.


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Details

Official Sites:

TOEI ANIMATION [Japan]

Country:

Japan

Language:

Japanese

Release Date:

21 July 1968 (Japan) See more »

Also Known As:

Little Norse Prince See more »

Filming Locations:

Tokyo, Japan

Company Credits

Production Co:

Toei Animation See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color (Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
See full technical specs »

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