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Romeo and Juliet (1968) Poster

Quotes

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Juliet: Yea, noise! Then I'll be brief. Oh, happy dagger, this is thy sheath; there rust and let me die.

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Romeo: My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand To smooth that rough touch with a gentle kiss.

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Juliet: That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet

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Benvolio: By my head, here comes the Capulets.

Mercutio: By my heel, I care not.

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Romeo: [at masquerade, looking at Juliet across crowded room] She doth teach the torches to burn bright.

[soft sigh]

Romeo: It seems she hangs on the cheek of night as a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear. Beauty too rich for use, for Earth too dear.

[soft sigh]

Romeo: So shows a showy dove, trooping with crows... as yonder lady o'er her fellows shows.

[takes off his mask]

Romeo: Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight! For I ne'er saw true beauty till this night.

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Juliet: Good night, good night. Parting is such sweet sorrow, That I shall say good night till it be morrow.

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Narrator: Two households, both alike in dignity / In fair Verona, where we lay our scene / From ancient grudge break to new mutiny / Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. From forth the fatal loins of these two foes / A pair of star-cross'd lovers take their life / Whose misadventured piteous overthrows / Do with their death bury their parents' strife.

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Juliet: Love give me strength.

[she drinks the potion]

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Juliet: My only love sprung from my only hate!

[shakes her head]

Juliet: Too early seen unknown, and known too late! Oh, prodigious birth of love it is to me... that I must love a loathed enemy!

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Romeo: But soft; what light through yonder window breaks? It is my lady! O, it is my love. O that she knew she were.

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Romeo: Thus with a kiss I die.

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Abraham: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

Sampson: I do bite my thumb, sir.

Abraham: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

Sampson: Is the law of our side if I say ay?

Gregory: No.

Sampson: No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you sir; but I bite my thumb, sir.

Gregory: Do you quarrel, sir?

Abraham: Quarrel, sir? No, sir.

Sampson: If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.

Abraham: No better.

Sampson: Well, sir.

Gregory: Say 'better'; here comes one of my master's kinsmen.

Sampson: Yes, better, sir.

Abraham: You lie.

Sampson: Draw, if you be men! Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

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Romeo: Death that hath sucked the honey of thy breath hath had no power yet upon thy beauty.

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Tybalt: What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds?

[draws sword]

Tybalt: Turn thee, Benvolio. Look upon thy death.

Benvolio: I do but keep the peace. Now, put away your sword or manage it to part these men with me.

Tybalt: [laughs] What? Drawn and you talk of peace? I hate the word as i hate hell, all Montagues, and thee. Have at thee, coward!

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Mercutio: Consort? What, dost thou make us minstrels? If thou makes us minstrels, look to hear nothing but discords. Here's my fiddlestick

[draws sword]

Mercutio: ; here's that will make you dance. Zounds, consort!

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The Prince: Where be these enemies? Capulet! Montague! See, what a scourge is laid upon your hate, That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love! And I, for winking at your discords too, Have lost a brace of kinsmen. All are punished.

The Prince: [Steps forward] All are punished!

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[enter Juliet above at a window]

Romeo: But soft. What light through yonder window breaks?

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Mercutio: A plague on both your houses. They've made worm's meat of me.

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[last lines]

Narrator: A glooming peace this morning with it brings. The sun for sorrow will not show his head. For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.

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Romeo: O,she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope's ear; Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear! So shows a snowy dove trooping with crows

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Lord Capulet: O lamentable day! Death lies on her like an untimely frost Upon the sweetest flower of all the field.

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Lady Capulet: I beg for justice, which thou, Prince, must give! Romeo slew Tybalt... Romeo must not live!

The Prince: Romeo slew him... He slew Mercutio. Who now the price of his dear blood doth owe?

Lord Montague: Not Romeo, Prince! He was Mercutio's friend. His fault concludes but what the law should end - the life of Tybalt!

The Prince: And for that offense, immediately we do exile him hence! Let Romeo hence in haste... Else, when he is found... that hour is his last.

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Gregory: Do you quarrel , Sir?

Abraham: Quarrel, Sir? No, Sir.

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Tybalt: Uncle, this is a Montague, our foe!

Lord Capulet: Hmmm?

Tybalt: A villain that hath come in spite / To scorn at our solemnity this night!

Lord Capulet: Young Romeo, is it?

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Friar Laurence: [as Juliet arrives] Ah, here comes the lady! So light a foot will ne'er wear out the everlasting flint!

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The Nurse: Shame come to Romeo!

Juliet: [scurrying to her feet] Blistered be thy tongue for such a wish! He was not born for shame! Upon his brow shame is ashamed to sit!

The Nurse: Would you speak well of him that killed your cousin?

Juliet: Should I speak ill of him that is my husband?

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Juliet: [as her lover Romeo is out of bed] Would thou be gone?

[sighs]

Juliet: It is not yet near day. It was the nightingale and not the lark that pierced the fearful hollow of thine ear.

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[first lines]

Narrator: Two households, both alike in dignity In fair Verona where we lay our scene. From ancient grudge break to new mutiny Where civil blood makes civil hands unclean From forth the fatal loins of these two foes A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life Whose misadventured piteous overthrows do with their deaths bury their parents' strife.

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